In pain? Many doctors say opioids are not the answer - Salon.com

Those of you who have experienced pain, especially gnawing, chronic pain, know that it affects your happiness, outlook and ability to function.In the past couple of years, the treatment of chronic pain has undergone an earthshaking transformation as opioid addiction continues to claim — and ruin — lives.Many primary care doctors no longer liberally prescribe opioid painkillers such as oxycodone, fentanyl and hydrocodone for back pain, migraines and other chronic conditions. Instead, they are increasingly turning to alternative medications and non-drug options such as acupuncture and physical therapy."Most primary care doctors are afraid to do pain management because of the opioid backlash," says Michael McClelland, a health care attorney in Rocklin, Calif., and former chief of enforcement for the state Department of Managed Health Care."Either they don't prescribe anything, and the patient remains in pain, or they turn them over to pain management specialists so someone else is writing that prescription."As a result, McClelland says,"people in genuine pain are going to find it more difficult to get medicine they may well need."More ...http://www.salon.com/2017/04/16/in-pain-many-doctors-say-opioids-are-not-the-answer_partner/
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

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Discussion Human trafficking is estimated to be the second largest criminal activity in the world after illegal arms trafficking. It affects all nations with an estimated 27 million people of all ages worldwide but only a small number are identified. It is defined by the United Nations as “the recruitment, transfer, harboring, or receipt of persons by means of threat or use of force or other forms of coercions, abduction, fraud, deception, the abuse of power, or a position of vulnerability to achieve the consent of a person, having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.” It includes comme...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Pain control is one of the biggest challenges facing America today, believes Dr. Peter Staats, co-founder and chief medical officer of electroCore. Chronic pain is an ongoing, debilitating problem for many patients, but for some, overuse of opioid treatments has led to addiction. Such a condition has led to an increasing number of U.S. deaths—one study published in the JAMA Network Open1 found that the percentage of all U.S. deaths attributable to opioids increased 292% between 2001 and 2016. This same study reported that in 2016, 20% of deaths of adults aged 24 to 35 years involve...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business Source Type: news
If you are one of the more than 100 million Americans suffering with chronic pain, you know how desperate you can get searching for relief. For constant or chronic pain, sometimes knowing that you can only get temporary relief from medications sits at the back of your brain and sets up pain anticipation. Shouldn’t there be a better way, an approach or approaches that don’t rely on pharmaceutical drugs to combat pain? According to new research, there are some new pain relief methods that look very promising to do just that. Treatment from Strangers Mat Provide Unexpected Pain Relief It may seem counter-intuitiv...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Chronic Pain Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychology Research Treatment Source Type: blogs
It is easy to ridicule a 2000-year-old treatment that can seem closer to magic than to science. Indeed, from the 1970s to around 2005, the skeptic’s point of view was understandable, because the scientific evidence to show that acupuncture worked, and why, was weak, and clinical trials were small and of poor quality. But things have changed since then. A lot. Thanks to the development of valid placebo controls (for example, a retractable “sham” device that looks like an acupuncture needle but does not penetrate the skin), and the publication of several large and well-designed clinical trials in the last d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Headache Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs
In August, The New York Times published a guest op-ed by a man named David Roberts who suffered from severe chronic pain for many years before finally finding relief. The piece immediately went viral, with distinguished news journalist and personality Dan Rather posting it to his Facebook page with the addendum that it could “offer hope” to some pain patients. However, for many of us in the chronic pain community, particularly women, the piece was regarded with weariness and frustration. The first and most prominent source of annoyance for me regarding this piece was the part when the author finally discloses h...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Pain Management Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Every relationship is stressful. What matters is how you DEAL with it. Couples across cultures and continents — of all races and religions, economics and demographics — experience the same human emotion when faced with relationship challenges and marriage problems. It feels like nothing ever gets resolved, the dance just keeps repeating itself. It’s a merry-go-round of pain, misunderstanding, hurtful words and blame that gets uglier with each turn of the wheel. The Weird Money Thing You Do That Puts Your Relationship At Risk In order to learn to cope with relationship stress, it’s crucial to identi...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Marriage and Divorce Money and Financial Publishers Relationships Sexuality YourTango Betrayal Breakups Dating Intimacy Monetary Gain Openness secrets Selfishness Source Type: blogs
There was plenty to blame: the car wreck that broke his back. The job pouring concrete that shattered his spine a second time. The way he tore up his insides with cigarettes, booze, cocaine, and opioids.It all amounted to this: Carl White was in pain. All the time. And nothing helped — not the multiple surgeries, nor the self-medication, not the wife and daughter who supported him and relied on him.Then White enrolled in a pain management clinic that taught him some of his physical torment was in his head — and he could train his brain to control it. It's a philosophy that dates back decades, to the 1970s o...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
Ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like naproxen are and have been the go-to “benign” pain medication for doctors and patients alike. Why? They aren’t addictive, and it’s not easy to overdose. Serious side effects like gastrointestinal ulcers and bleeding seemed to be limited to high doses taken for longer periods or time, or to people with significant medical problems. Even before the era of the opioid epidemic, it was raining NSAIDs, across the country. In 2004, the manufacturer of the NSAID Vioxx pulled it from the market because the drug was associated with serious...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Drugs and Supplements Headache Health Heart Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs
By Stacy SimonThe ancient Indian practice of yoga combines meditation, breathing, and precise postures and poses to make a connection with thoughts, body, and spirit. People who practice yoga claim it leads to a state of physical health, relaxation, happiness, peace, and tranquility.Some evidence shows that yoga can lower stress, increase strength, and lessen lower back pain, while providing exercise. And according to a report from the National Institutes of Health, there is also some evidence to suggest yoga may be helpful when used alongside conventional medical treatment to help relieve some of the symptoms linked to ca...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Complementary and Alternative Methods Source Type: news
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