Acquired Angioedema: A Rare Manifestation of Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma

We present extremely rare case of elderly male with recurrent tongue swelling, pruritus with normal levels of complements and C1 esterase inhibitor protein featuring as acquired angioedema, a rare manifestation of AITL. Initial response to corticosteroids may be misleading and occurs as a result of immunosuppression of AITL. High index of suspicion may prompt need for histopathological diagnosis of lymph node biopsy. Definitive chemotherapeutic treatment may achieve long term remission.
Source: Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research

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ConclusionsKD is characterized by subcutaneous masses but it is also a systemic disease. Given the high rate of recurrence and reported association with lymphoma, patients require careful long-term follow-up.Key Points• Kimura disease (KD) is a rare inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology that is endemic in Asia.• Clinicians must regard and manage KD as a systemic disease.• There is no consensus on optimal treatments and further studies are necessary to improve outcomes.• Given the high rate of recurrence and reported association with lymphoma, patients require careful long-term follow-up.
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
We report a 48-year-old female seamstress presenting with a 2-year history of dyshirotic dermatitis-like eruption on the hands and feet, which was treated as pompholyx with systemic and topical corticosteroids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, and cyclophosphamide therapy previously in a rheumatology clinic.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: We found hypopigmented MF to be the most common clinical presentation in patients under 18 years of age. The disease did not progress to advanced stages in any of the patients, although recurrence after treatment interruption was common. PMID: 31277835 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Actas Dermosifiliogr Source Type: research
Christine I. Alston1,2 and Richard D. Dix1,2* 1Department of Biology, Viral Immunology Center, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, United States 2Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins provide selective negative feedback to prevent pathogeneses caused by overstimulation of the immune system. Of the eight known SOCS proteins, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are the best studied, and systemic deletion of either gene causes early lethality in mice. Many viruses, including herpesviruses such as herpes simplex virus and cytomega...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Erica S. Tarabadkar† and Michi M. Shinohara*† Division of Dermatology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States Skin directed therapies (SDTs) serve important roles in the treatment of early stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL)/mycosis fungoides (MF), as well as managing symptoms and improving quality of life of all stages. There are now numerous options for topical therapies that demonstrate high response rates, particularly in early/limited MF. Phototherapy retains an important role in treating MF, with increasing data supporting efficacy and long-term safety of both UVB and PUVA as ...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
AbstractThe incidence and clinical implications of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in patients with non-Hodgkin ’s lymphoma(NHL) remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of ADs in NHL and define the clinical characteristics and prognosis of AD-associated NHL patients. Patients diagnosed with NHL in our institute between 1995 and 2017 were retrospectively reviewed to assess the inc idence of ADs. Of 4880 patients with NHL, 140 (2.9%) presented with autoimmunity, with a total of 24 ADs. The most common AD was Sjögren syndrome, followed by autoimmune cytopenia, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, ...
Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Neuro-Beh çet’s disease is difficult to distinguish from LC when other clinical findings, including human leukocyte antigen disparity, serum sIL-2R, or cerebrospinal IL-6, are lacking. LC should be differentiated from CNS lymphoma before corticosteroid therapy.Case Rep Oncol 2018;11:806 –813
Source: Case Reports in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion: This retrospective study reinforces the critical need for a histologic diagnosis when a patient is diagnosed with PCNSL. PCSNL is considered to be DLBCL but there are other histology's that could potentially be PCSNL and the treatment should be tailored to the individual patient's histology.DisclosuresNo relevant conflicts of interest to declare.
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 627. Aggressive Lymphoma (Diffuse Large B-Cell and Other Aggressive B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas)-Results from Retrospective/Observational Studies: Poster III Source Type: research
Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is a rare condition that falls underneath the umbrella of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). SPTCL can be very difficult to diagnose as it may mimic other subtypes of CTCL, such as γ/δ T-cell lymphoma (TCL), or other forms of panniculitis. Confirmation of diagnosis often requires immunohistochemical analysis and is essential for proper prognosis and therapeutic management. Herein, we present a case of SPTCL that mimicked lupus panniculitis and was successfully treated with p rednisone taper and methotrexate.
Source: Dermatology Online Journal - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Abstract Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is a rare condition that falls underneath the umbrella of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). SPTCL can be very difficult to diagnose as it may mimic other subtypes of CTCL, such as γ/δ T-cell lymphoma (TCL), or other forms of panniculitis. Confirmation of diagnosis often requires immunohistochemical analysis and is essential for proper prognosis and therapeutic management. Herein, we present a case of SPTCL that mimicked lupus panniculitis and was successfully treated with prednisone taper and methotrexate. PMID: 30677832 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Dermatol Online J - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Dermatol Online J Source Type: research
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