Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Infectious Diseases A-Z: Mumps outbreaks in the U.S.

The Arkansas Department of Health is investigating 2,918 confirmed cases of mumps and reports some of those cases involved children and adults who were immunized. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says, "The measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR) is very good in preventing mumps but not perfect. Often we see a large [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Related Links:

CONCLUSIONS: In each of the FSM states, a substantial proportion of children received DTaP and MMR doses outside the recommended timeframe. Children who receive vaccinations later than recommended remain susceptible to VPDs during the period they remain unvaccinated, which may have a substantial impact on health systems during an outbreak. Immunization programs should consider vaccination timeliness in addition to coverage as a measure of susceptibility to VPDs in young children. PMID: 29029941 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
"Measles eliminated in the UK for the first time," reports The Telegraph. This and other stories in the media are based on a new World Health Organization (WHO) report confirming the UK is now one of 33 countries in Europe to have "eliminated" measles. "Elimination" is the official term used once a country has reduced the number of cases of a disease to a low enough level to stop it spreading through the general population for at least three years. It doesn't mean that measles has been wiped out or eradicated in the UK. In 2016 there were more than 500 cases in England and Wales. However, the ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news
By the Editors A third dose of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine helped prevent mumps infection during an outbreak at the University of Iowa in 2015 –16, …
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - Category: Primary Care Source Type: news
When health officials learned that the 2015 measles outbreak was caused by clusters of unvaccinated children, Americans once more wanted to understand why some parents do not vaccinate their children. In our highly polarized culture, media commentators and even academics began to connect opposition to vaccination to either the left or right of politics. So a question arises: Who is more likely to be opposed to vaccination, liberals or conservatives? As a sociologist who studies infectious disease, I took a look at this. The answer seems to depend on what question you ask. Because the outbreak started in the wealthy, libera...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Primary Care Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs
Conclusions The current policy on most college campuses requires verification that incoming students have received two doses of the MMR vaccination. The goal of this policy is to prevent the diseases measles and mumps. A longstanding federal trial against Merck, the pharmaceutical company responsible for making the MMR vaccine, accuses Merck of manipulating data to show the MMR to be more effective against mumps than it is. Recent outbreaks of mumps on college campuses by students vaccinated with the MMR vaccine provides additional evidence that the MMR vaccine is ineffective. Data from the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Michelle Goldstein Top Stories college vaccination Mandatory Vaccination MMR vaccine truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs
A 5% drop in measles, mumps and rubella vaccinations could cause a threefold increase of measles cases, costing the public sector millions, US study showsA small decline in the uptake of vaccines could have a dramatic impact on both public health and the economy, research suggests, as concerns about outbreaks of preventable diseases grow in the US and Europe.The new study reveals that even a 5% drop in uptake of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine among children in the US could result in a threefold increase in measles cases, and cost the public sector millions of dollars.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Infectious diseases Vaccines and immunisation MMR Health Society Science Medical research Source Type: news
Abstract On April 10, 2017, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) was notified about a suspected measles case. The patient was a hospitalized child aged 25 months who was evaluated for fever and rash, with onset on April 8. The child had no history of receipt of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and no travel history or known exposure to measles. On April 11, MDH received a report of a second hospitalized, unvaccinated child, aged 34 months, with an acute febrile rash illness with onset on April 10. The second patient's sibling, aged 19 months, who had also not received MMR vaccine, had similar symptoms, with...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Follow me at @JohnRossMD The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. So why are we still having measles attacks? An outbreak of measles is currently raging in Minnesota. In 2015, 125 cases of measles occurred in California, and in 2014, 383 people were infected with measles in an Amish community in Ohio. How measles outbreaks happen There are several reasons why we are still at risk for measles outbreaks. Travelers may get infected overseas, and bring the measles virus back into the country with them unawares. The 2015 measles outbreak in Ohio began when two infected members of the Amish ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Of U.S. adult travelers who presented for pretravel consultation at GTEN sites, 16% met criteria for MMR vaccination according to the provider's assessment, but fewer than half of these travelers were vaccinated. An increase in MMR vaccination of eligible U.S. adult travelers could reduce the likelihood of importation and transmission of measles virus. Primary Funding Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, and the Steve and Deborah Gorlin MGH Research Scholars Award. PMID: 28505632 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Intern Med Source Type: research
Deeqa Hussein can’t put her finger on exactly how or when the vaccination disconnect happened in her community. For years, the large number of Somali immigrant parents in the Twin Cities area vaccinated their children at rates as high as 92 percent ― outpacing virtually every other ethnic group. And then, Hussein said, many parents just stopped.  “I felt like there was a lot fear and anxiety surrounding the MMR vaccine,” said Hussein, a special-education teacher with the Minneapolis Public Schools who also serves as the vice president of the local Somali Parents Autism Network and has two sons with...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Children | Databases & Libraries | Department of Health | Infectious Diseases | Measles | Measles Vaccine | Mumps | Mumps Vaccine | Outbreaks | Rubella | Rubella Vaccine | Vaccines