When Advice Crosses the Line

During the process of my son’s recovery from his eating disorder I have received advice from many places. More often than not this advice was helpful and appreciated. Many people have shared with me their tips and creative strategies for managing eating disorders in their homes and many of them I utilized in our own home. There was, of course, that “advice” from friends or family members that was really not very helpful at all. That generally wasn’t advice though. That was usually a very ill-informed statement or comment that would sometimes make me wonder whether it was intended to be helpful at all or who it was intended to help. It often appeared to be something that the “advice giver” just wanted to get off of their chest or said to reassure them that my situation wouldn’t happen in their home. That said, I can honestly say that most of the time the advice I have received was sound and well intended. While I have not personally been the victim of advice that crosses the line, I have witnessed many examples of this and recently have seen a tremendous increase in its occurrence. Support groups are widely available now. I have been involved in support groups that meet locally on a monthly basis and have been involved in online support groups. I have noticed for quite some time that I see much more, what I would call, dictating treatment rather than support or opinion. I frequently see such statements as, “you should dump that E...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Caregivers Eating Disorders Family Parenting Psychotherapy Treatment dietary needs Family therapy Grief Healthcare Providers Malnutrition Support Group Support Groups unsolicited advice Source Type: news

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Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are characterized by severely restricted intake, binge eating, and compensatory behaviors like self-induced vomiting. The neurobiological underpinnings of these maladaptive behaviors are poorly understood, but the application of cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging to eating disorders has begun to elucidate their pathophysiology. Specifically, this review focuses on 3 areas that suggest paths forward: reward, cognitive and behavioral control, and decision making. Understanding the brain-based mechanisms that promote and maintain these often chronic symptoms could guide the developmen...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Though limited by heterogeneity across the studies in terms of methodology and aims, inability to control for relevant confounding variables, exclusion of ED not otherwise specified, this study supports suicide attempts as a major issue in EDs, especially in binge-purging subtypes, i.e. BN and AN-bp. Similar suicidal proportions were observed in AN and BED. The reasons for a greater proportion of attempted suicide in binge/purging subtypes need to be explored in future studies. PMID: 30488811 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Psychological Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Psychol Med Source Type: research
Eating disorders are biologically based brain illnesses influenced by environmental and psychological factors. Environmental risk factors for developing an eating disorder include weight and appearance pressures, media messaging, and weight bullying. Biological factors include dieting/food exposure, genetics, neurochemistry, neurobiology, and hormones (notably estrogen). Psychological factors include stress, life transitions, identity, trauma, anxiety, depression, and substance use. While risk factors predispose certain individuals to eating disorders, precipitating factors such as significantly altering how one eats or s...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Bullying Children and Teens Eating Disorders Neuroscience Psychology Women's Issues Body Dysmorphia Body Image bulimia. food addiction Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 2 November 2018Source: Molecular and Cellular EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Laura A. Berner, Tiffany A. Brown, Jason M. Lavender, Emily Lopez, Christina E. Wierenga, Walter H. KayeAbstractThe pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are still poorly understood, but psychobiological models have proposed a key role for disturbances in the neuroendocrines that signal hunger and satiety and maintain energy homeostasis. Mounting evidence suggests that many neuroendocrines involved in the regulation of homeostasis and body weight also play integral roles in food reward valuat...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
ConclusionNES has its clinical significance; however, it overlaps with BN in several dimensions of psychopathology. Presence of night eating in a BN group may not contribute clinically meaningful psychopathology.
Source: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 28 October 2018Source: Molecular and Cellular EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Athif Ilyas, Christopher Hübel, Daniel Stahl, Marietta Stadler, Khalida Ismail, Gerome Breen, Janet Treasure, Carol KanAbstractBackgroundA recent study reported a positive genetic correlation between anorexia nervosa and insulin sensitivity using data from genome-wide association studies. Epidemiological studies have, on the other hand, suggested that bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder are associated with decreased insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysi...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 October 2018Source: Molecular and Cellular EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Larissa Hetterich, Isa Mack, Katrin E. Giel, Stephan Zipfel, Andreas StengelAbstractEating disorders, namely anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder are frequent diseases and often complicated by comorbidities, e.g. psychiatric or cardiovascular comorbidities. It is to note that also gastrointestinal symptoms/complications are frequently observed in patients with eating disorders. These diseases will be presented in the current review along with – where known – possible underlying mechani...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
I went for a run because I had eaten a small, organic, dark chocolate cookie the day before and I felt that I had to punish myself. It was habitual for me to punish myself with strenuous, caloric compensation cardio whenever I felt guilty for enjoying life by eating tasty foods. When I placed first in a fitness competition, my fitness goals went up a notch. Winning the competition was one thing, but people complimenting me on my extra lean body pressured me to stay that way. I couldn’t allow myself to look “bigger” again, and “bigger” really meant not seeing my defined ab muscles. It was a su...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Personal Spirituality Fitness Loving Kindness Meditation self-compassion Source Type: blogs
Eating disorders can be easy to hide. Know what to look for. Often when I work with parents they say they had no idea their child’s eating disorder was going on as long as it was. Eating disorders are easy to hide so it’s important, as a parent to be aware of what signs you should look for in your child. Eating disorders are secretive and can be very easy to hide from loved ones, especially in the beginning. Sometimes, the person experiencing an eating disorder is not fully aware that what they are doing is not healthy so it makes it that much more important for parents to be fully educated on what to look fo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Caregivers Children and Teens Eating Disorders Parenting Perfectionism Personal Psychotherapy Stories Women's Issues Adolescence Body Image Cognitive Distortion Dissociation Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 18 August 2018Source: Neurobiology of StressAuthor(s): Christina E. Wierenga, Jason Lavender, Chelsea C. HaysAbstractEating disorders (ED), including Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and Binge Eating Disorder (BED), are medically dangerous psychiatric disorders of unknown etiology. Accumulating evidence supports a biopsychosocial model that includes genetic heritability, neurobiological vulnerability, and psychosocial factors, such as stress, in the development and maintenance of ED. Notably, stress hormones influence appetite and eating, and dysfunction of the physiological s...
Source: Neurobiology of Stress - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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