Revealed: girl of 13 is first child in Britain to receive artificial heart

Daring operation saved Chloe Narbonne after a failed transplant meant the device was the only way to keep her aliveChloe ’s story: one girl, four hearts and an NHS miracleA 13-year-old girl from Worcester is the first child in Britain to have received an artificial heart, the Guardian can reveal, after doctors decided it was the only way to save her life.Chloe Narbonne had the device installed in a complex nine-hour operation that involved 30 NHS staff at the Royal Brompton, a specialist heart and lung hospital in London. The artificial heart kept the then 12-year-old girl alive until a human heart became available a few weeks later.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Organ donation NHS Health Society Children Science UK news Medical research Source Type: news

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Heart transplantation is the definitive treatment for end-stage heart failure. A shortage of donor hearts forced transplant programs to accept older donors and longer ischemic times. Previous studies have suggested that the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or their conditioned medium (CM) protects the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). We hypothesized that the preservation of donor hearts with a CM would protect the graft from IRI after prolonged storage in 15-month-old rats and investigated mRNA-changes attributable to CM.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Pre-Clinical Science Source Type: research
Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) affects over 50% of lung transplant recipients (LTR) by five years and remains the primary reason for graft failure 1. It has been increasingly recognized that CLAD is a heterogeneous diagnosis with variable prognosis and different phenotypes: bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and restrictive allograft syndrome (RAS). Precise diagnosis of CLAD remains difficult: There are no clinically-validated biomarkers, and diagnosis can be subjective, hinging on the correct interpretation of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) coupled with exclusion of clinical confounders.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: RESEARCH CORRESPONDENCE Source Type: research
The added value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in the follow-up of patients with stable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains undefined.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Clinical Science Source Type: research
Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is a major cause of post-lung transplant mortality with limited medical treatment options. We assessed the association of montelukast treatment with pulmonary function and outcome in lung transplant recipients with progressive CLAD.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Right ventricular failure (RVF) is still associated with an increased mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) or congenital heart disease. Transition from right ventricular dysfunction to RVF is not predictable and has not been well understood so far. Several studies in rodents and in piglets showed that impairment of capillary density (CD) in the right ventricle (RV) is associated with right ventricular failure (1, 2). Some evidence suggested that the RV of patients with Eisenmenger Syndrome (ES) has remarkable adaptive capacities to high pulmonary pressures (3), leading to a longer survival in these patien...
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Research Correspondence Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS Management by dedicated intensivists will improve not only the number of actual organ donors, but also the number of harvested organs. PMID: 30510153 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Ann Transplant Source Type: research
Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is great variability in how different organ allografts respond to the same tolerance induction protocol. Well known examples of this phenomenon include the protolerogenic nature of kidney and liver allografts as opposed to the tolerance-resistance of heart and lung allografts. This suggests there are organ-specific factors which differentially drive the immune response following transplantation. RECENT FINDINGS: The specific cells or cell products that make one organ allograft more likely to be accepted off immunosuppression than another are largely unknown. However, new insi...
Source: Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Curr Opin Organ Transplant Source Type: research
Risk stratification of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is in the center of health care interests and has recently been addressed by numerous studies that are based on large international PH registries (1-5). Less evidence exists for Group 3 PH (6). Therefore, Rose et al, in their paper in this issue of JHLT, are to be commended on their efforts to identify predictors of survival in Group 3 PH patients, to characterize the clinical phenotypes and survival differences between patients with mild and severe Group 3 PH, and to evaluate how the etiology of lung disease impacts patient profiles and survival.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
In this issue of the Journal, Dr. Mooney and colleagues report their analysis of the impact of lung allocation across broader geographic areas, rather than allocation first within a donor service area (DSA), or organ procurement organizations (OPOs)1. To better appreciate the importance of this study, some historical context might be helpful.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
We learn from basic physiology  lessons that human body is made up of 60 % water. What about heart ? There is no reason for the heart should behave differently from rest of the body . If my  assumptions are correct when the normal heart weighs 300g  , 180g of which should be  be water. The same thing could be applicable for LV mass( * Reference requested) Is there myocardial congestion in cardiac failure ? Genesis of edema in any tissue depends on local hydrostatic pressures, tissue resistive forces, osmotic balance, and cell membrane permeability. In the myocardium individual contri...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: cardiac failure Cardiac MRI Cardio Nephrology effect of dialysis on myocardial water content lv amss and myocardial edema myocardial edema and ckd chronic kidney failure myocardial interstitial edema myocardial water imaging water logging Source Type: blogs
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