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The Truth About How Emotional Pain Affects Your Body

Back when I was 30, my life fell apart. My marriage collapsed, I sank into a depression, and I lost my home, money, and self-respect. I also blew out my knee. I wish I could say I injured it climbing Mount Kilimanjaro or something, but no—it was nothing that exciting. Here’s what happened: One afternoon, right in the middle of my God-awful divorce, I turned my head to look at something over my right shoulder, and suddenly my left knee...exploded. It made a sound like a gunshot, and I felt something inside the joint go snap. Then my leg went out from under me, and I hit the ground in agony. When I finally stood up, I was limping. And I limped for the next 13 years. Long after I had put my life back together, my knee still hurt. I tried everything to fix it: physical therapy, acupuncture, ice, heat, yoga, massage, and ibuprofen by the handful. (The one remedy I refused to attempt was surgery, only because I knew so many people whose knee surgery had made their condition worse.) Over time, I resigned myself to the fact that my knee was just bad—the way certain dogs and art and upholstery patterns are just bad. And then one day, about five years ago, I did a curious thing. I decided to try to really listen to my bad knee. We’d spend a quiet evening together, with the lights turned down and the phone turned off, in order to understand each other. I got very still with myself, focused all my attention upon my knee, and asked it, with loving respect, “W...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Mainstream doctors are quick to prescribe drugs to bring high blood pressure down.  They may put you on one, two or even three of Big Pharma’s drugs. They include diuretics, beta-blockers, and calcium channel blockers.   These drugs have serious side effects. I’m talking about things like edema, dizziness, nose bleeds, rash and hearing loss. They can lead to cardiac failure, heart attack, depression, colitis, and arthritis pain.  It’s bad enough risking those side effects if you have to. But your doctor may be giving you these pills for NO good reason. You mi...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
The language of the Alexander/Murray bill is now available. Our post of yesterday, October 17 provides an on the whole accurate description and analysis of the bill. One late addition deserves further discussion, however. As noted in an earlier post, many states have already required or allowed their insurers to increase premiums to account for the shortfalls the insurers will experience for the CSR payment cut off. Rather than require the insurers to refile their rates again, delaying the 2018 open enrollment period, the proposed language would leave the increased rates in place but require insurers to rebate overpayments...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage ACA section 1557 agents and brokers cost-sharing reduction payments gender identity qualified health plans Source Type: blogs
Abbott (NYSE:ABT) said today it launched its Proclaim dorsal root ganglion neurostimulator system designed to treat pain in patients with complex regional pain syndrome of the lower limbs. The company’s Proclaim DRG system is designed to be used via Bluetooth with an Apple (NSDQ:AAPL) iPod touch as a system controller and is magnetic resonance-conditional and recharge free, all upgrades from previous versions of the device, the Abbott Park, Ill.-based company said. Abbott said it originally launched the DRG therapy system in 2016 and data from the Accurate study of it showed the system delivers “...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business/Financial News Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Pain Management Abbott Source Type: news
There are many things in life we can’t control—everything from tiny annoyances to tragedies. We can’t control if our grandmother gets cancer and passes away. We can’t control if we get cancer. We can’t control what others think, say or do. We can’t control what others think of us. We can’t control who our loved ones hang out with. We can’t control who we work with or who’s in charge. We can’t control Mother Nature, or today’s traffic. But, of course, we can control our reactions to all the things we can’t control. I’m sure you’ve heard that...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Health-related Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress control freak Controlling Behavior Coping Skills Disappointment Failure Perfectionism Resilience Source Type: blogs
In this study, we have shown that the lipid chaperones FABP4/FABP5 are critical intermediate factors in the deterioration of metabolic systems during aging. Consistent with their roles in chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in young prediabetic mice, we found that FABPs promote the deterioration of glucose homeostasis; metabolic tissue pathologies, particularly in white and brown adipose tissue and liver; and local and systemic inflammation associated with aging. A systematic approach, including lipidomics and pathway-focused transcript analysis, revealed that calorie restriction (CR) and Fabp4/5 deficiency result ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study aimed to determine the clinical, psychological features, and quality of life in Chinese fibromyalgia (FM) patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 2010 FM classification criteria at initial diagnosis. A cross-sectional study was carried out in the Chinese People ’s Liberation Army (PLA) General Hospital. A hundred and seven Chinese FM patients (86 females, 21 males) were included. Eighty-six patients completed the questionnaires. Descriptive, differences, and correlation analyses were performed. The results showed that Chinese FM patients started their di seases at a median age of ...
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
UCLA Health ’s Operation Mend, a program for wounded U.S. veterans, celebrated its 10th anniversary at a Red, White and Denim-themed backyard party that raised more than $1.1 million to benefit the program.The celebration was held at the home of Operation Mend founder and philanthropist Ronald Katz on Sept. 24.  Nearly 600 guests attended, including 53 veterans who have been treated through the program and their caregivers. Operation Mend provides free surgical, medical and psychological services to  wounded service members injured in the line of duty after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attac...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Publication date: 1 January 2018 Source:Neuroscience Letters, Volume 662 Author(s): Xi Jiang, Qizhi Yan, Fuhe Liu, Changfeng Jing, Lianshu Ding, Lijin Zhang, Cong Pang Patients suffering from chronic neuropathic pain are at high risk of co-morbid depression, which burdens healthcare. Trans-astaxanthin has been shown in our previous studies to exert antidepressant-like effect. This work aimed to investigate the effects of trans-astaxanthin on pain-related depressive-like behaviors in mice and explored the mechanism(s). Chronic constriction injury (CCI) model was used in this research. Chronic pain was evaluated by thermal ...
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
In August, The New York Times published a guest op-ed by a man named David Roberts who suffered from severe chronic pain for many years before finally finding relief. The piece immediately went viral, with distinguished news journalist and personality Dan Rather posting it to his Facebook page with the addendum that it could “offer hope” to some pain patients. However, for many of us in the chronic pain community, particularly women, the piece was regarded with weariness and frustration. The first and most prominent source of annoyance for me regarding this piece was the part when the author finally discloses h...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Pain Management Women's Health Source Type: blogs
You're reading 7 Things a Person with a Mental Illness Doesn’t Want to Hear, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. In the United States alone, nearly one out of every five people is suffering with one or more mental illnesses. That means that when a person passes you by on the street, they have a better chance of having a mental illness than of having green eyes. Yet, why are so many people struggling with knowing what to say, or maybe what NOT to say, when they are talking to a person with anxiety, depre...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: depression featured psychology self confidence self improvement mental health mental illness pickthebrain relationships Source Type: blogs
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