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The Truth About How Emotional Pain Affects Your Body

Back when I was 30, my life fell apart. My marriage collapsed, I sank into a depression, and I lost my home, money, and self-respect. I also blew out my knee. I wish I could say I injured it climbing Mount Kilimanjaro or something, but no—it was nothing that exciting. Here’s what happened: One afternoon, right in the middle of my God-awful divorce, I turned my head to look at something over my right shoulder, and suddenly my left knee...exploded. It made a sound like a gunshot, and I felt something inside the joint go snap. Then my leg went out from under me, and I hit the ground in agony. When I finally stood up, I was limping. And I limped for the next 13 years. Long after I had put my life back together, my knee still hurt. I tried everything to fix it: physical therapy, acupuncture, ice, heat, yoga, massage, and ibuprofen by the handful. (The one remedy I refused to attempt was surgery, only because I knew so many people whose knee surgery had made their condition worse.) Over time, I resigned myself to the fact that my knee was just bad—the way certain dogs and art and upholstery patterns are just bad. And then one day, about five years ago, I did a curious thing. I decided to try to really listen to my bad knee. We’d spend a quiet evening together, with the lights turned down and the phone turned off, in order to understand each other. I got very still with myself, focused all my attention upon my knee, and asked it, with loving respect, “W...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Written by Pendell MeyersI received a text at 18:13 of an ECG taken several minutes prior, with no clinical information and only the question " De Winters? "Here is the ECG:What would you tell the treating team???I responded at 18:14 PM:" I think it's posterior STEMI (OMI) instead of de Winter. Cath lab immediately is indicated. "I clarified further:" De Winter would need hyperacute T waves (not present here), and would indicate acute occlusion of the territory in the affected leads; so if there was de Winter in anterior leads, that would mean the anterior wall is the one involved. Here we have iso...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: We conclude that co-administration of tramadol and ondansetron can be practiced in medical ICU patients without any higher requirement in dosage of tramadol.
Source: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine - Category: Intensive Care Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractLow back pain is one of the most common causes for seeking medical treatment and it is estimated that one in two people will experience low back pain at some point during their lifetimes. Management of low back pain includes pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. Non-pharmaceutical treatments include interventions such as acupuncture, spinal manipulation, and psychotherapy. The latter is especially important as patients who suffer from low back pain often have impaired quality of life and also suffer from depression. Depressive symptoms can appear because back pain limits patients ’ ability to wo...
Source: Pain and Therapy - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
AbstractChiari Malformation type I (CM-I) is a neurological disorder characterized by a displacement of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum into the spinal canal. Most research has focused on physical symptomatology but few studies include neuropsychological examinations. Moreover, although current research highlights the involvement of the cerebellum on higher cognitive functions, little is known about cognitive consequences associated with CM-I. The aim of this study is to analyze cognitive functioning between 39 CM-I patients and 39 healthy controls, matched by gender, age and years of education. Participa...
Source: The Cerebellum - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
so S, Al-Rashaida M, Amayra I Abstract Chiari Malformation type I (CM-I) is a neurological disorder characterized by a displacement of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum into the spinal canal. Most research has focused on physical symptomatology but few studies include neuropsychological examinations. Moreover, although current research highlights the involvement of the cerebellum on higher cognitive functions, little is known about cognitive consequences associated with CM-I. The aim of this study is to analyze cognitive functioning between 39 CM-I patients and 39 healthy controls, matched by gende...
Source: Cerebellum - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cerebellum Source Type: research
In conclusion, we found that chronic social stress alters the neurobiological response to surgical injury, resulting in slowed recovery. This model maybe useful for future interventional studies examining the mechanistic interactions between depression and risk of CPSP.
Source: Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Authors: LaVela SL, Etingen B, Miskevics S, Heinemann AW Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine variables associated with satisfaction with life (SWL) in individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI). DESIGN: Cross-sectional, national survey to assess SWL, demographic and injury characteristics, health care utilization, chronic conditions (obesity, diabetes, heart problems, lung problems, hypertension, high cholesterol), symptoms (poor sleep, pain, depression), social support, grief/loss, and independence. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling Veterans with SCI. Outcome Measures/Analyses: Bivariate analyses were c...
Source: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: J Spinal Cord Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The combination of antidepressant pharmacotherapy and PST was not superior to antidepressant pharmacotherapy and supportive management. Clinically, the rates of response and stability of response over 1 year observed in both groups suggest that these approaches may have clinical utility in these chronically suffering patients. PMID: 29724663 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research
ConclusionsOne in five new orthopedic patients reports Anxiety levels that may warrant intervention. This rate is heightened in patients needing spine care. Patient-reported Physical Function more strongly correlates with PROMIS Anxiety than Depression suggesting that the Anxiety CAT is a valuable addition to assess mental health among orthopedic patients.Level of EvidenceDiagnostic level III.
Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
Depression is a complicated condition, and so are the people it affects. It’s often difficult — and can take months or even years — to find the right drugs to treat the heterogeneous mood disorder. But for decades, doctors have been treating depression essentially by prescribing a drug and hoping for the best. They rely on asking people about their family history of mental illness and fold in as much information as they can about symptoms. Since 2010, however, there has been a genetic test that can help doctors learn how a person’s genetic makeup can also affect their response to various antidepress...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain Depression healthy time Source Type: news
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