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The Truth About How Emotional Pain Affects Your Body

Back when I was 30, my life fell apart. My marriage collapsed, I sank into a depression, and I lost my home, money, and self-respect. I also blew out my knee. I wish I could say I injured it climbing Mount Kilimanjaro or something, but no—it was nothing that exciting. Here’s what happened: One afternoon, right in the middle of my God-awful divorce, I turned my head to look at something over my right shoulder, and suddenly my left knee...exploded. It made a sound like a gunshot, and I felt something inside the joint go snap. Then my leg went out from under me, and I hit the ground in agony. When I finally stood up, I was limping. And I limped for the next 13 years. Long after I had put my life back together, my knee still hurt. I tried everything to fix it: physical therapy, acupuncture, ice, heat, yoga, massage, and ibuprofen by the handful. (The one remedy I refused to attempt was surgery, only because I knew so many people whose knee surgery had made their condition worse.) Over time, I resigned myself to the fact that my knee was just bad—the way certain dogs and art and upholstery patterns are just bad. And then one day, about five years ago, I did a curious thing. I decided to try to really listen to my bad knee. We’d spend a quiet evening together, with the lights turned down and the phone turned off, in order to understand each other. I got very still with myself, focused all my attention upon my knee, and asked it, with loving respect, “W...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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In this study, we examine the relationship between depression and patient-reported functional outcomes (PRFO), including disability and pain, at various time-points postoperatively.
Source: The Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Clinical Study Source Type: research
p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 11.0px Helvetica; background-color: #fefefe}A middle-aged male diabetic who is otherwise healthy was found unconscious by his wife, with incontinence.  He quickly awoke but was too weak to stand.  Initial vitals by EMS were BP 100/50 with pulse of 80 and normal glucose.  He remained weak and somnolent, and without focal neurologic abnormality.  He recovered full consciousness, but still felt weak and " not normal. "  There was a prehospital ECG:What do you think?He arrived in the ED and had this ECG recorded:This one was sent to me for my ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
As a relatively new and still poorly recognized concept, few people come to therapy identifying as suffering from Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD). As a rule, a diagnosis of C-PTSD comes only after the process of self-discovery in therapy has begun. When people suffering from C-PTSD are referred to a therapist, or decide to seek help for themselves, it is usually because they are seeking help for one of its symptoms, including dissociative episodes, problems forming relationships, and alcohol or substance abuse. One of the more common issues that leads to the discovery of C-PTSD is the presence of an eating ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Loneliness Psychology PTSD Trauma Treatment affect regulation Bingeing Body Image C-PTSD Child Abuse child neglect Childhood Trauma complex posttraumatic stress di Source Type: news
This study will be a two-group, single-blind, randomised controlled trial. One hundred and sixty adults with chronic, nonspecific LBP will be recruited. Participants allocated to both groups will receive a group exercise programme. In addition, the intervention group will receive health coaching sessions (i.e. assisting the participants to achieve their physical activity goals) and an activity monitor (i.e.Fitbit Flex). The participants allocated to the control group will receive sham health coaching (i.e. encouraged to talk about their LBP or other problems, but without any therapeutic advice from the physiotherapist) and...
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Beth came to therapy because she could not stop her mind from worrying. She’d think about the same things over and over, get stuck in a thought with no solutions loop. She’d wake up obsessing about her future and blaming herself for past mistakes. Intellectually she knew she just had to do her best and take everything a day at a time. But she could not quiet her mind. Ruminating, as defined by Webster’s Medical Dictionary, is “obsessive thinking about an idea, situation, or choice especially when it interferes with normal mental functioning; specifically: a focusing of one’s attention on negat...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Fear Obsession OCD Worry Source Type: blogs
The objective of this study was to explore associations between alcohol consumption and disease activity in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). We conducted a cross-sectional study of axSpA participants meeting the ASAS criteria. Associations between self-reported current alcohol use and disease activity (BASDAI, spinal pain, ASDAS), functional impairment (BASFI), and quality of life were explored using multivariable linear models, adjusting for age, gender, symptom duration, use of TNF inhibition therapy, smoking, deprivation, and anxiety and depression (A&D). Within alcohol drinkers, effect of increased alcohol intake (defi...
Source: Rheumatology International - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Conclusion of Our Case Oh yeah! We were discussing a real patient. What happened there? The patient was intubated for pulmonary edema complicating cardiogenic shock and taken immediately to the cath lab. Angiography of the right coronary artery was grossly normal, showing a dominant RCA. pic.twitter.com/3zzlMdQbhv — Musa A. Sharkawi (@MusaSharkawi) December 21, 2017   When they shot the left coronary system, however, only a stump was visible due to a thrombotic 100% occlusion of the left main coronary artery. LM pic.twitter.com/bGJsplQcwp — Musa A. Sharkawi (@MusaSharkawi) December 21, 2017   Balloo...
Source: EMS 12-Lead - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Cases Vince DiGiulio Source Type: research
View Original Article Here: Tai Chi For Seniors: Exercises, Benefits, and Tips For The Elderly Tai chi, a form of Chinese martial arts that focuses on slow, controlled movements. It’s low impact and gives people with limited mobility a chance to improve their balance, range of motion and coordination. Research shows that tai chi for seniors can reduce the incidence of falls in elderly and at-risk adults by about 43 percent. With fewer than 34 percent of aging adults getting enough exercise, it’s important for caregivers, older individuals and people who work with seniors to know about this gentle but effective ...
Source: Shield My Senior - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Senior Safety Source Type: blogs
ConclusionThe ECG findings could be due to either dynamic early repolarization (normal variant ST elevation), or to pericarditis, or to acombination of the 2 entities.Yes, normal variant ST elevation can be dynamic:Increasing ST elevation. STEMI vs. dynamic early repolarization vs. pericarditis.ST elevation of early repolarization may vary with the rateChest pain, Dynamic ST Elevation and T-waves, and High VoltageAlternatively, the ECG could represent pericarditis superimposed on early repol.  There certainly was pericarditis, but that does not mean the ECG findings were due to pericarditis.This paradox is extremely w...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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