Boy left blind after cancer took over half his brain

Ryder Fox developed a tumour over half his brain at just 18 months old and was left blind and infertile as a result. The youngster from Melbourne has since undergone surgery and chemotherapy
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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AbstractChemotherapy-induced gonadal dysfunction resulting in transient or persistent infertility depends on the type of drugs and cumulative dose, and it is an important long-term complication, especially for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. Due to its importance, a clinical practice guideline for fertility preservation in childhood and AYA cancer patients was published by the Japan Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO) in 2017. Although the precise mechanisms remain unclear, several studies reported that the cancer itself, not the cancer treatment, adversely affected semen quality. It is reported that that...
Source: International Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
UCLA researchers have made new inroads into understanding germ cell tumors, a diverse and rare group of cancers that begin in germ cells — the cells that develop into sperm and eggs. The researchers developed a protocol to recreate germ cell tumor cells from stem cells and used the new model to study the genetics of the cancer.Their findings could point the way toward new drugs to treat germ cell tumors, which account for around 3 percent of all cases of childhood and adolescent cancer.The study, published in Stem Cell Research, was led by Amander Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology an...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
WebMD wasn't a research option when Ivy Brown was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1974, so her mother looked up her 12-year-old daughter's condition the old-fashioned way, in a hardcover medical volume. "It just said 'fatal,'" Brown explained. Having moved the family to London a month earlier, Brown's parents were still trying to liaise with her pediatrician in the U.S. "My father told me recently that he was sleeping with the phone on his stomach because of the time change," she said. "They were as scared as you can be when you have a child who you think you might lose," Brown explained....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
By Stacy Simon RESOURCES: Preserving fertility in boys and teens with cancerPreserving fertility in girls and teens with cancer A study by researchers from leading cancer centers across the US has found that modern chemotherapy treatments have only a small impact on the ability of female childhood and adolescent cancer survivors to have children when they grow up. However, male survivors are more likely to have fertility problems. An estimated 400,000 survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer are living in the US today. However, therapies to treat their cancer can affect their reproductive health when they become ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cancer in Adolescents Childhood Cancer Source Type: news
Nathan Crawford has become the first person in Britain to have a wedge of testicular tissue removed and frozen before cancer treatment
Source: Telegraph Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: chemotherapy chance infertility tissue radiatherapy sperm frozen cancer oxford risk men Source Type: news
Here are five things you may not know about Oncofertility: 1. The word "Oncofertility" was coined by Dr. Teresa K. Woodruff of Northwestern University to define an area of academic research and practice that concerns both oncology and reproductive medicine. Oncofertility researchers and practitioners study fertility preservation options and are innovating new ways to help people who face impaired or reduced fertility rates due to cancer. 2. Cancer and its treatment can affect a person's ability to have children. 3. We still do not completely know or understand the barriers and why a hundred percent of eligible p...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CHICAGO (AP) -- Barely 2 years old, Talia Pisano is getting tough treatment for kidney cancer that spread to her brain. She's also getting a chance at having babies of her own someday.  To battle infertility sometimes caused by cancer treatment, some children's hospitals are trying a futuristic approach: removing and freezing immature ovary and testes tissue, with hopes of being able to put it back when patients reach adulthood and want to start families. No one knows yet if it will work. It has in adults - more than 30 babies have been born to women who had ovarian tissue removed in adulthood, frozen, and put back af...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Conclusion: there is no increased risk of doing the lymph node dissection early on.   Dr. Eggener-CON   Basics Lymph node dissections rarely done, even for large tumors, because there is no proven therapeutic or staging benefit for low risk patients.  A Mayo study revealed no data showing therapeutic benefit in high risk patients.  For clinically node negative high risk patients, there is staging value but no proven therapeutic benefit. Rate of positive nodes is associated with stage and grade; the higher the stage and grade, the more likely there will be positive nod...
Source: Kidney Cancer Association - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news
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