Secular trends in the incidence of dementia in high-income countries: a protocol of a systematic review and a planned meta-analysis

Introduction A global dementia epidemic is projected for the year 2050 with an ever-rising number of individuals living with the syndrome worldwide. However, increasingly, studies are emerging from high-income countries (HIC) that show a positive trend towards a possible decrease in dementia occurrence. Therefore, we aim to systematically summarise evidence regarding secular trends in the incidence of dementia in HIC. Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review of the literature on secular trends in dementia incidence in HIC according to the recommendations of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) and the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) statements. To do so, we will search the databases MEDLINE (PubMed interface), EMBASE (Ovid interface) and Web of Science (Web of Science interface), as well as the grey literature on unpublished studies. To be eligible, studies must have been published in English or German since 1990 and provide sufficient information on prespecified eligibility criteria regarding outcome measurement and methodological approach. Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment will be performed independently by 2 reviewers. Disagreement will be resolved by discussion and/or the involvement of a third researcher. Data abstraction will include study and participant characteristics, outcomes and methodological aspects. Results will be described and discussed regard...
Source: BMJ Open - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Open access, Epidemiology, Global health, Health policy, Public health Protocol Source Type: research

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ConclusionPeople with dementia living in the community were found to be physically inactive. This study has displayed that increased levels of physical activity can show signs of an improved self-perceived quality of life. This study was a correlational study and causality was not investigated. The association we have identified may provide support and foundation for future studies that explore causal components.
Source: Age and Ageing - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Abstract Mild to moderate cognitive decrements are a well-known phenomenon associated with diabetes mellitus. In this review, we provide an overview of the cognitive consequences of type 1 and type 2 diabetes based on hallmark studies that follow patients over an extended period of time. In patients with type 1 diabetes, cognitive dysfunction appears soon after diagnosis and can be found in individuals of any age. The magnitude of these effects is generally modest, although their severity is especially pronounced in those with early onset type 1 diabetes (diagnosis before 7 years of age) or those who have develo...
Source: Neurobiology of Disease - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neurobiol Dis Source Type: research
DEMENTIA is a growing challenge, according to the NHS. More and more elderly are being diagnosed with the condition and the health epidemic affects not only the patient but their carers too. What are the best tools to help those suffering from the condition and those caring for them?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion: Neurological disorders are common in HIV in Africa and the main CNS opportunistic infections result in high  mortality rates. Strategies aimed at reducing their high burden, morbidity and mortality include early HIV diagnosis and anti-retroviral therapy (ART), screening and chemoprophylaxis of main opportunistic infections, improved clinical diagnosis and management and programme strengthening.Keywords: Neurological disorders, HIV, Africa, opportunistic infections, direct HIV infection and inflammatory disorders.
Source: African Health Sciences - Category: African Health Source Type: research
Nearly a decade of published research has made geriatric psychiatrists aware that age-related hearing loss, which is epidemic and largely untreated among older adults, is associated with significant adverse neuropsychiatric and other health consequences.1 Analyses by Frank Lin and colleagues at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have shown convincingly that as the severity of hearing loss progresses from mild to severe, the risk for incident dementia compared to those with normal hearing rises nearly five-fold.
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research
Nearly a decade of published research has made geriatric psychiatrists aware that age-related hearing loss, which is epidemic and largely untreated among older adults, is associated with significant adverse neuropsychiatric and other health consequences.1 Analyses by Frank Lin et al. at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have shown convincingly that as the severity of hearing loss progresses from mild to severe, the risk for incident dementia compared to those with normal hearing rises nearly fivefold.
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research
In the absence of treatment options, the WHO emphasizes the identification of effective prevention strategies as a key element to counteract the dementia epidemic. Regarding the complex nature of dementia, tri...
Source: BMC Geriatrics - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Study protocol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Limited data of in vivo CTE biomarkers with postmortem confirmation are available. While some data exist, they are limited by selection bias. It is unlikely that a single test will be sufficient to properly diagnosis and distinguish CTE from other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease or Frontotemporal Dementia. However, with a combination of fluid biomarkers, neuroimaging, and genetic testing, early detection may become possible. PMID: 31287716 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The British Journal of Radiology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Br J Radiol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: Personalized Medicine UniverseAuthor(s): Minako Abe, Hiroyuki AbeAbstractLifestyle-related chronic illnesses, such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and dementia are rising at an alarming, epidemic rate. In this modern world of increasing lifespan, we are actually decreasing our health span, placing an undue burden on healthcare costs to society. Modern medicine has largely gotten away from addressing key issues to prevent or even reverse some of these chronic conditions. Yet the evidence for successful interventions in four key areas – nutrition, s...
Source: Personalized Medicine Universe - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Anyone who remembers the days before finger stick blood glucose meters became available to people with diabetes will recall how awful life was for diabetics. All they had was urine dipsticks which were sloppy, yielded only crude non-quantitative feedback on blood sugars, and gave you a gauge of what blood sugars were in the recent past, not the present. It meant that dosing insulin or diabetes drugs was grotesquely imprecise and accounted for many episodes of hypoglycemic coma and acceleration of diabetic complications. It was not uncommon in those days, for instance, for a type 1 diabetic to be blind and experience kidney...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: SIBO bowel flora Inflammation probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
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