Overactive bladder syndrome and lower urinary tract symptoms after prostate cancer treatment

Purpose of review: To assess the contemporary literature on the prevalence, cause and management of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and bladder overactivity following treatment of prostate cancer with radical surgery, radiotherapy and minimally invasive therapies for localized prostate cancer, including cryotherapy and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Recent findings: Generally, the highest risk of urinary incontinence is after open radical prostatectomy (7–40%), although not all contemporary studies demonstrate a difference between open and laparoscopic techniques. An increased incidence of bladder overactivity is seen with radiotherapy (as compared to radical prostatectomy). Bladder outlet obstruction is most commonly encountered after radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy combination therapy (up to 26%). It manifests as voiding LUTS or urinary retention, and the risk can accumulate over time. Cryotherapy and HIFU provide effective cancer treatment with lower risks of urinary incontinence, but have fewer published studies and shorter follow-up. Medical treatment options for LUTS include alpha blockers, anticholinergics, and potentially intravesical glycosaminoglycan analogue instillations. Stress urinary incontinence requires surgical correction with artificial urinary sphincter or suburethral slings. Summary: Patients who have undertaken successful prostate cancer treatment have a good prognosis, and commonly present for further interventions to optim...
Source: Current Opinion in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: PELVIC HEALTH: Edited by Karl-Dietrich Sievert and Larissa V. Rodriguez Source Type: research

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Do drugs work for ΟΑΒ following prostate cancer surgery? Curr Drug Targets. 2020 Jul 16;: Authors: Sakalis V, Gkotsi A Abstract There is evidence that post-radical prostatectomy (post-RP) incontinence is not just insufficiency of external urethral sphincter mechanism. Up to a third of men with post-RP incontinence, suffer from bladder dysfunction, namely overactive bladder (OAB). OAB is complex symptom syndrome with poorly defined pathophysiology. It causes significant burden to patients, negatively affects quality of life and its management might be difficult and challenging. The i...
Source: Current Drug Targets - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Drug Targets Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe modified technique of bladder neck intussusception in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy prolongs the length of functional posterior urethra and is effective to improve postoperative early continence.
Source: International Urology and Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Conclusion: A Martius flap and additional fascial sling could be successfully used to optimize DUF treatment.
Source: International Braz J Urol - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Conclusion: A Martius flap and additional fascial sling could be successfully used to optimize DUF treatment.
Source: International Braz J Urol - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) has fewer complications as compared to conventional techniques; however, cases of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and overactive bladder (OAB) are still observed following RARP. Intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP) has been reported to correlate with dysuria due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to assess the potential of IPP as a predictor of the occurrence of postoperative SUI and OAB.
Source: The Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Prostate Cancer: Localized: Surgical Therapy III Source Type: research
As men age, the simple act of urinating can get complicated. Prostate surgery often leaves men vulnerable to leakage when they cough, sneeze, or just rise from a chair. Or the bladder may become impatient, suddenly demanding that you find a bathroom right now. “Thousands of years ago, it was not as much of an issue,” observes Dr. Anurag Das, a urologist at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “There were lots of trees, and you could just find one and go.” But tricky bladders can be whipped into shape. The first step is a careful assessment of what triggers those difficult moments...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthy Aging Incontinence Men's Health Prostate Health Source Type: blogs
By age 60, you have a 50/50 chance of having a clinically enlarged prostate. And it only gets worse every year. When your prostate isn’t functioning properly, it’s hard to enjoy life. Traditional doctors give you two choices. Go under the knife or you take Big Pharma’s drugs. Either way, you have a good chance of ending up with your manhood on the line… If you have surgery, there’s a big risk you’ll be saying goodbye to your sex life for good. The rate of impotence is a shocking 50 to 60% after prostate surgery.1 Big Pharma’s meds to shrink your prostate are no better. These sy...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
When was the last time you went in for your annual checkup? In honor of Men's Health Month, I want to discuss the importance of paying attention to your body and visiting your primary care physician on a regular basis. If you're healthy, a yearly visit might be sufficient but if you have a family history of any disease, have a pre-existing condition, or have suffered an injury, you may have to follow up with a doctor or specialist more often. A doctor's visit is as much a part of a healthy lifestyle as clean eating and consistent exercise. If you have any issues or symptoms, especially any of the below, don't be afraid to ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
ConclusionsOne in three older men with non‐neurogenic OAB had sustained remission of symptoms without medical or surgical interventions. No significant predictor of sustained remission was identified. Neurourol. Urodynam. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Source: Neurourology and Urodynamics - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Clinical Article Source Type: research
ConclusionsOne in three older men with non‐neurogenic OAB had sustained remission of symptoms without medical or surgical interventions. No significant predictor of sustained remission was identified. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:443–448, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Source: Neurourology and Urodynamics - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Clinical Article Source Type: research
More News: Bladder Cancer | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cryotherapy | High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy | Incontinence | Laparoscopy | Nutrition | Overactive Bladder | Overactive Bladder Syndrome | Prostate Cancer | Study | Ultrasound | Urology & Nephrology