Effects of Traumatic Stress Induced in the Juvenile Period on the Expression of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Type A Subunits in Adult Rat Brain.

This study used inescapable foot-shock to induce PTSD in juvenile rats and examined their emotional changes using open-field test and elevated plus maze, memory changes using Morris water maze, and the expression of GABAAR subunits (γ2, α2, and α5) in subregions of the brain in the adulthood using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. We aimed to observe the role of GABAAR subunits changes induced by juvenile trauma in the pathogenesis of subsequent PTSD in adulthood. In addition, we investigated the protective effects of exercise for 6 weeks and benzodiazepine (clonazepam) for 2 weeks. This study found that juvenile traumatic stress induced chronic anxiety and spatial memory loss and reduced expression of GABAAR subunits in the adult rat brains. Furthermore, exercise led to significant improvement as compared to short-term BZ treatment. PMID: 28352479 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Neural Plasticity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neural Plast Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: The results highlighted the heterogeneity of recovery in the initial recovery period following severe to extremely severe TBI and have the potential to inform clinical advice regarding outcome trajectories. PMID: 31020899 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Clinical Neuropsychologist - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Clin Neuropsychol Source Type: research
Conclusion Currently available pharmacotherapies for PTSD are poorly effective on a substantial proportion of patients. Given this high rate of pharmacological unresponsiveness, further studies are needed to extend the knowledge of the basic mechanisms associated with the pathophysiology of this disorder. The findings discussed in this review suggest that DAergic dysfunction, especially genetic-dependent DAergic alteration, plays a prominent role in the pathophysiology of PTSD; as a consequence, drugs targeting the DAergic system might be therapeutically relevant. A better understanding of how and which DAergic dysfunctio...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Look into my eyes. The phrase calls to mind images of a psychotherapist swinging a pocket watch. Or maybe you picture Catherine Keener in the film Get Out, tapping her teacup and sending an unwilling man into a state of hypnotic limbo. “There are many myths about hypnosis, mostly coming from media presentations,” like fictional films and novels, says Irving Kirsch, a lecturer and director of the Program in Placebo Studies at Harvard Medical School. But setting aside pop culture clichés, Kirsch says hypnosis is a well-studied and legitimate form of adjunct treatment for conditions ranging from obesity and...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news
Sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) is a parasomnia that links eating disorders to partial arousal during the transition between wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. It is characterized by dysfunctional eating and drinking upon partial arousal from a stage of NREM sleep (also known as slow-wave sleep). As a form of sleepwalking, it entails partial or complete amnesia of the event. According to one study, the estimated prevalence of SRED was nearly 5% in the general population. The disorder is more common than generally recognized, and we can agree it requires more public awareness. This type of connection...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Diet & Nutrition Eating Disorders Neuroscience Sleep Stigma Stress Binge Eating Disorder Bingeing Disordered Eating nightmare disorder parasomnia restless leg syndrome Sleep apnea sleep disorder sleep hygiene sleep-related ea Source Type: news
Publication date: July 2017 Source:The Lancet Neurology, Volume 16, Issue 7 Author(s): Joukje van der Naalt, Marieke E Timmerman, Myrthe E de Koning, Harm J van der Horn, Myrthe E Scheenen, Bram Jacobs, Gerard Hageman, Tansel Yilmaz, Gerwin Roks, Jacoba M Spikman Background Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) accounts for most cases of TBI, and many patients show incomplete long-term functional recovery. We aimed to create a prognostic model for functional outcome by combining demographics, injury severity, and psychological factors to identify patients at risk for incomplete recovery at 6 months. In particular, we investi...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
How do I know that I’m suffering from the sequelae of a traumatic event? Trauma happens. It happens in everyday life. If not discharged properly it sleeps in our bodies and in our souls. When it sleeps, it morphs and over time the symptoms of which become far removed from the trauma of origin, so much so we might not identify the connection. Without that connection, symptoms cannot truly resolve. That is the course of the aftermath of a traumatic moment or event. If you agree that we are comprised of energy and matter, then you will understand that trauma is in our bodies and in our souls. How does trauma create symp...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: PTSD Spirituality Trauma Avoidance constriction Fight or Flight Hyperarousal Hypervigilance Isolation Nervous System Post-concussion syndrome posttraumatic stress Psychological trauma Source Type: news
"I'm doing everything wrong." "Everyone's laughing at me." "I think I left the door open." Anxiety comes in different shapes and sizes. #atozofmentalhealth - - - - - #365daysofart #drawingaday #36daysoftype @36daysoftype #36days_A #36daysoftype04 #mentalhealth #art #typography #lettering #colors #anxiety #watercolor #igart #sketchbook #digitalart #illustration #selflove #care #mentalhealthawareness #endthestigma A post shared by Sonaksha Iyengar (@sonaksha) on Feb 21, 2017 at 8:22am PST A is for anxiety, which itself comes in many shapes and colors. B is for bipolar disorder, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In conclusion, taking into account the high prevalence of SD in men with TBI and its multifactorial etiology, we believe clinicians who treat patients with TBI should be properly trained in human sexuality in order to better meet the needs of these patients. Clinicians should be prepared to have frank, educated discussions on sexual functioning with all of their TBI patients so that they may provide valuable information to their patients on achieving healthy sexual functioning; this in turn will help their patients and their patients’ partners achieve a higher quality of life. References Bivona U, Antonucci G, Contr...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Current Issue Evaluations Letters to the Editor Medical Issues Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Traumatic Brain Injury clinician-patient interaction sexual dysfunction TBI Source Type: research
This study examined the prevalence of DSM-5 PTSD, conditional probability of PTSD given certain trauma exposures, endorsement of specific PTSD symptoms, and psychiatric comorbidities in the US veteran population. METHODS: Data were analyzed from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study (NHRVS), a Web-based survey of a cross-sectional, nationally representative, population-based sample of 1,484 US veterans, which was fielded from September through October 2013. Probable PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Checklist-5. RESULTS: The weighted lifetime and past-month prevalence of probable DSM-5 PTSD was 8.1% (...
Source: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: J Clin Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions This study suggests that CBT can improve quality of life for adults with persistent PCS and potentially reduce symptoms for some, in the context of outpatient brain injury rehabilitation services. Trial registration number ISRCTN49540320.
Source: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Dementia, Neurological injury, Stroke, Trauma CNS / PNS, Anxiety disorders (including OCD and PTSD), Memory disorders (psychiatry), Trauma, Injury Neuropsychiatry Source Type: research
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