Cytopathological Changes Induced by the Crack Use in Oral Mucosa

Aims: To evaluate cytological alterations, inflammation, and microbial charge of the oral mucosa epithelium in crack users in in terms of the amount and duration of use.Methods: Two hundred thirty four crack users (case group) and 120 non-users (control group) participated in this study. Clinically healthy epithelial cells were collected from the posterior mouth floor, using the conventional exfoliative cytology. Some of the aspects evaluated were as follows: Papanicolaou classification, nuclear area (NA), cytoplasmic area (CA), nuclear/cytoplasmic area ratio (NA/CA), inflammation, microbial charge, keratinization, enucleated superficial cells, and binucleation.Results: The average time of crack consumption was 9.8 years ( ±7.1) and the average quantity of use was 13.97 g/week (±18.5). The average NA values and NA/CA ratio were increased and CA values were decreased in the case group compared to those in the controls (p
Source: European Addiction Research - Category: Addiction Source Type: research

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By SAURABH JHA, MD Despite an area under the ROC curve of 1, Cassandra’s prophesies were never believed. She neither hedged nor relied on retrospective data – her predictions, such as the Trojan war, were prospectively validated. In medicine, a new type of Cassandra has emerged –  one who speaks in probabilistic tongue, forked unevenly between the probability of being right and the possibility of being wrong. One who, by conceding that she may be categorically wrong, is technically never wrong. We call these new Minervas “predictions.” The Owl of Minerva flies above its denominator. ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Data Medical Practice Physicians RogueRad @roguerad acute kidney injury AI deep learning machine learning predictions Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs
Discussion Drawing conclusions on the causation of adverse health effects by environmental chemicals can have important societal consequences, leading to policy-making which can control, limit or even prevent the exposure to the pollutant through regulation and litigation. There are critical lessons to be learned from the Monsanto saga. The whole process of evidence-informed policy-making is under threat. The case of glyphosyte is by no means over; further research is needed to cover the knowledge gaps, but this should be done independently and with full transparency. The IARC Monographs provide the scientific evaluation ...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Discussion Drawing conclusions on the causation of adverse health effects by environmental chemicals can have important societal consequences, leading to policy-making which can control, limit or even prevent the exposure to the pollutant through regulation and litigation. There are critical lessons to be learned from the Monsanto saga. The whole process of evidence-informed policy-making is under threat. The case of glyphosyte is by no means over; further research is needed to cover the knowledge gaps, but this should be done independently and with full transparency. The IARC Monographs provide the scientific evaluation o...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Authors: Tags: Scand J Work Environ Health Source Type: research
Tuberculosis (TB) is one of most important non-obstetric causes of maternal death. The aim of study was to estimate TB morbidity in pregnant and postpartum women (PW) in Gomel region as well as risk factors and level of drug resistance. Proportions are presented with 95% CI computed by the modified Wald method. We studied all new cases of lung TB found in PW in 2013-2016 - 51 patients, the proportion was 11.2% (8.5-14.5) of all women aged 18-45. TB incidence was 50.9 per 100000 deliveries which is reliably higher than in control group (women aged 18-45 excepting PW, TB incidence was 31,6 per 100000 women), p=0.03. 19.6% (1...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Tuberculosis Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This study will help recognize tuberculosis patients' characteristics and comorbidities influencing the development and evolution of the disease from an age and gender perspective to enable the development of social and community-based strategies. PMID: 30184347 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomedica : Revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Biomedica Source Type: research
Conclusions: These new resources offer substantial advances to classical toxicity testing paradigms by including genetically sensitive individuals that may inform toxicity risks for sensitive subpopulations. Both in vivo and complementary in vitro resources provide platforms with which to reduce uncertainty by providing population-level data around biological variability. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1274 Received: 25 October 2016 Revised: 19 April 2017 Accepted: 27 April 2017 Published: 15 August 2017 Address correspondence to K.A. McAllister, Program Administrator, Genes, Environment, and Health Branch, Division of E...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
A 52-year-old male patient, farmer, was referred with local pain and tooth mobility in the remaining teeth of the anterior mandible. On anamnesis, he affirmed to be a former alcoholic and tobacco addiction for the past forty years. Intraoral examination showed extensive diffuse ulcer covered by a whitish mass in partially edentulous left anterior mandible extending to the mouth floor and mobility of involved teeth. Along with pre-operatory exams prescription, cytologic smears of the lesion were performed.
Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: CPP - Clinical Poster Presentation Source Type: research
Herein we report a case of morbid development of advanced-stage squamous cell carcinoma. A 54-year-old male patient was referred because of a 2.5-cm wide ulcerated lesion, with elevated edges in the floor of the mouth. Panoramic radiograph revealed a poorly defined radiolucency affecting the alveolar ridge from teeth 34 to 44. Anamnesis found tobacco and alcoholic addiction. Cervical palpation verified a cold 4-cm wide submandibular enlarged node. Immediate cytologic smear was performed, along with preoperative exams.
Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: CPP - Clinical Poster Presentation Source Type: research
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In medicine, our motto is first do no harm. Words matter. Choose them wisely. Here are 7 words that shame, blame, and injure people who need our help. 1. Don’t say COMMITTED suicide. Committed implies a crime. Committed rape, burglary, murder. Suicide is not a crime; it’s a medical condition that has been taboo for too long. Let’s come out of the dark ages and use proper language to discuss the cause of death. It’s died OF pneumonia, heart attack, stroke, suicide. Say died OF suicide (or died BY suicide). 2. Don’t say she IS bipolar. People are people first. Some get physical and/or mental hea...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Video Primary care Source Type: blogs
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