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Periventricular White Matter Lesions as a Prognostic Factor of Swallowing Function in Older Patients with Mild Stroke

AbstractOlder patients with stroke have poor functional prognosis compared to younger patients. Patients with stroke who have severe white matter (WM) lesions have been reported to have poor functional prognosis such as cognitive dysfunction, increased propensity for falling, and gait and balance problems. The aim of this study was to determine whether WM lesions exert negative effects on swallowing function in older patients with mild stroke. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 63 patients aged  >65  years who had a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≤5 and who underwent videofluoroscopic swallowing examination after their first stroke. Linear regression analysis showed that oral transit time tended to increase as Fazekas grade increased (p = 0.003). In addition, inadequate mastication was related to the presence of lesions in the left hemisphere (p = 0.039). The presence of penetration could also be predicted by Fazekas grade (p = 0.015). Our findings suggest that WM lesions observed in brain magnetic resonance imaging scans can impact swallowing problems in older patients with mild stroke, regardless of initial stroke severity or other factors associated with lesion location. Accordingly, our data indicate that WM lesio ns are a predictive factor by which patients can be stratified into favorable or unfavorable outcomes with respect to dysphagia.
Source: Dysphagia - Category: Speech Therapy Source Type: research

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ConclusionThe findings suggest that the patient has right-sided cerebral language dominance, or that both hemispheres have linguistic functions. Not all patients show linguistic capabilities on the side opposite hand preference. The language dominance should be predicted by a combination of clinical manifestations and functional imaging techniques.
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology atrophy brain health index Brain-health brain-injury cerebral small vessel diseases cognition computer-assisted image processing magnetic resonance imaging stroke Source Type: blogs
AbstractRight ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) diastolic stiffness may be independent contributors to disease progression in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The aims of this study are to assess reproducibility of peak emptying rate (PER) and early diastolic peak filling rate (PFR) for both the RV and the LV in PAH and study their relationship to stroke volume (SV). Triple weekly repetition of 20 (totalling 60) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) scans, were done on 10 patients with PAH and 10 healthy controls. RV and LV volumes were measured over the full cardiac cycle. PER and PFR were calculated as t...
Source: The International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Cerebral microhemorrhage (CMH) is a neuropathological term that could be easily found in cerebral amyloid angiopathy, intracerebral hemorrhages, etc. CMHs could be detected clearly in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) –susceptibility-weighted imaging or MRI T2* scan. This terminology is now accepted in the area of neuroimaging. CMHs are quite common in elderly patients and are associated with several other neuropsychiatric disorders. The causes of CMHs are complicated, and neuroinflammation is considered as one of the well-accepted mechanical factors.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Background and Purpose—Stroke imaging is pivotal for diagnosis and stratification of patients with acute ischemic stroke to treatment. The potential of combining multimodal information into reliable estimates of outcome learning calls for robust machine learning techniques with high flexibility and accuracy. We applied the novel extreme gradient boosting algorithm for multimodal magnetic resonance imaging–based infarct prediction.Methods—In a retrospective analysis of 195 patients with acute ischemic stroke, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, diffusion-weighted imaging, and 10 perfusion parameters were ...
Source: Stroke - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Ischemic Stroke Original Contributions Source Type: research
Cerebral microhemorrhage (CMH) is a neuropathological term that could be easily found in cerebral amyloid angiopathy, intracerebral hemorrhages, etc. CMHs could be detected clearly in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) –susceptibility-weighted imaging or MRI T2* scan. This terminology is now accepted in the area of neuroimaging. CMHs are quite common in elderly patients and are associated with several other neuropsychiatric disorders. The causes of CMHs are complicated, and neuroinflammation is considered as one of the well-accepted mechanical factors.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
We examined the relationships between visual ratings of WMH, atrophy, and old infarcts in patients who had both CT and MRI scans.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Clinical Neuroradiology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Pediatric Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Abstract In vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is a promising tool for the imaging evaluation of neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of α7 nAChRs after brain diseases such as cerebral ischemia and its involvement in inflammatory reaction is still largely unknown. In vivo and ex vivo evaluation of α7 nAChRs expression after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was carried out using PET imaging with [11C]NS14492 and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Pharmacological activation of α7 receptors was evaluated with magneti...
Source: Glia - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
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