Julianne Hough Gets Honest About Dealing With Endometriosis

Endometriosis, the painful medical issue where tissue that normally lines the uterus grows outside of it, can often go undetected thanks to professionals and patients alike not taking it seriously. Need proof? Just ask Julianne Hough. The “Dancing with the Stars” judge has been dealing with symptoms of the condition from the time she was 15, but like so many women who also suffer from endometriosis, figured it was normal. “I just thought it was part of being a woman,” she told The Huffington Post. “It felt awkward to talk about because obviously talking about your period is uncomfortable ― even though it shouldn’t be.” It wasn’t until she moved to Los Angeles and talked with her new roommate, who also had endometriosis, that she learned that her symptoms might not be just run-of-the-mill. After finally being diagnosed by a doctor, she took time off “Dancing with the Stars” in 2008 in order to get surgery to help with the condition. By that point, she had been dealing with the severe abdomen pain and the other effects of illness ― like excessive bleeding and fatigue ― for years.  “I think I was still a little nervous to talk about it,” she said of the time following her surgery, before she discussed the issue publicly. “It’s sort of seen as this weird, awkward thing to talk about women’s health issues ... but then I got older and was like, ‘You know what? T...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Like endometriosis, uterine adenomyosis is another enigmatic disease and remains a source of controversy. Uterine adenomyosis is characterized by the presence of endometrial glands in the myometrium. Two main theories may explain its pathogenesis: adenomyosis may arise from invagination of the myometrial basalis into the myometrium; or an alternative theory maintains that it may result from metaplasia of displaced embryonic pluripotent m üllerian remants or differentiation of adult stem cells. Uterine adenomyosis is responsible for pelvic pain, abnormal bleeding, and infertility.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Views and reviews Source Type: research
When my first period came at age 13, it involved blood clots and extreme pain. I didn’t know what to expect or what was considered “normal,” but thankfully, my mother did. She recognized that my symptoms were unusual and immediately took me to see my pediatrician. I was first prescribed birth control pills, which seemed to help initially, but when my period remained heavy and painful, I was put on a different birth control pill that enabled me to have my period only four times a year. I thought my situation was normal – albeit uncomfortable and inconvenient. No one ever suggested that painful period...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Teen Health endometriosis Marc Laufer Source Type: news
Endometriosis, the presence of endometrial tissue outside of the uterine cavity, is a common cause of pelvic pain and infertility, affecting approximately 10% of women. Endometriosis frequently affects the ovaries, where it causes cysts called endometriomas. Our group has described two types of histologically distinct endometriomas: Type I endometriomas arise from implants of endometrial tissue on the ovaries with subsequent invagination and bleeding into the ovarian stroma resulting in formation of a small, densely adherent cyst.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Video session Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 27 June 2017 Source:Reproductive BioMedicine Online Author(s): Silvia Vannuccini, Claudia Tosti, Francisco Carmona, S Joseph Huang, Charles Chapron, Sun-Wei Guo, Felice Petraglia Adenomyosis is a uterine disorder becoming more commonly diagnosed in women of reproductive age because of diagnostic imaging advancements. The new epidemiological scenario and the clinical evidence of pelvic pain, abnormal uterine bleeding and infertility are changing the classic perspective of adenomyosis as a premenopausal disease. In the last decade, the evaluation of multiple molecular mediators has improve...
Source: Reproductive BioMedicine Online - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Andrea Syrtash was first hospitalized at the age of 14 for painful and heavy menstrual cycles due to endometriosis. She had no idea her condition would affect her fertility ― and even if she had known, she may not have thought to address it without guidance from her doctors. After six years of trying to conceive, Syrtash, who’s now in her 40s and works as a relationship and dating expert, recently founded pregnantish, a website for singles, couples and LGBTQ people who are trying to conceive.  “When you’re a teenager, it’s not on your mind,” she said. Had she known, “I migh...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The post What a pain! – Lisa’s story appeared first on Hysterectomy Association. I knew I had endometriosis as it had a laparoscopy that identified this in my mid thirties as part of infertility investigations. I tried ICSI once after that and paid privately but we were unsuccessful in having a baby. We carried on ‘leaving it up to nature’ for many years after that but nothing happened. At the age of forty three we decided that we wouldn’t actively pursue my getting pregnant any more and put the idea to bed – my husband has a 17 yr old daughter from a previous marriage and she lives...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Your Stories endometriosis Source Type: news
Abstract Endometriosis is a chronic disease of women during their reproductive age. The most typical symptoms are dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, dysuria, cyclical and acyclical pelvic pain, bleeding disorders and infertility. These symptoms lead to significant impairment of the quality of life and economic burden. The prevalence is estimated to be 2-20 % of all women in this age and due to this fact, it is one of the most frequently benign gynecological diseases. Not all women suffer from severe symptoms, but more than 50 % require ongoing treatment. Beside the severe physical impairment due to the...
Source: Schmerz - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Schmerz Source Type: research
STUDY QUESTION What is the feasibility of performing transvaginal hydrolaparoscopy (THL) in an outpatient setting? SUMMARY ANSWER It is feasible to perform THL in an outpatient setting, reflected by a low complication and failure rate and a high patients' satisfaction. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY THL is a safe method to investigate tubal patency and exploring the pelvis in subfertile women. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Retrospective cohort study of 1127 subfertile women who underwent THL as primary diagnostic method for testing tubal patency in an outpatient setting. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS We studied all TH...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Infertility Source Type: research
Despite what a carefree tampon commercial would have you believe, that time of the month can be uncomfortable, varied and complex. No two periods look the same: Some women experience excruciating symptoms each time. Others may skip months entirely. And did you know that men can also have a physical reaction to a woman’s monthly cycle? Basically, there’s more to a period than what you hear in pop culture. And it will serve everyone better to be more informed about the process and armed with the facts. Below are a few things everyone should know about that oh-so-wonderful time of the month: 1. The ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
During an ob.gyn. rotation, a medical student quickly learns the risks related to endometriosis; that is, pelvic pain, abnormal uterine bleeding, and infertility. With more experience, the young...
Source: Ob.Gyn. News - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
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