How Being A Surrogate Showed This Mom How Strong Women Can Be

For a mom in Australia who has been a surrogate and has donated her eggs, helping others welcome children into their families has shown her the true strength of women. Melissa Holman has been a surrogate twice, once using her eggs and once using the intended mother’s. She has also been an egg donor for 17 other babies, including four sets of twins. Holman told The Huffington Post that her surrogacy journey has been “both hard and extremely satisfying.” She has also learned how strong women can be, and wrote about her appreciation for “the sisterhood” in a Facebook post that blogger Constance Hall shared on her page.  “While supporting women through infertility, I am constantly amazed at the strength, resilience and determination of these women,” she said. “Most of all, their endless capacity to love and care for their sisterhood.” In her post, Holman shared a photo that shows her holding a baby boy she had recently given birth to. This marked the second time she had been a surrogate. “He was perfect ― a screaming newborn mess, lifted off my stomach and put gently into his Mother’s loving arms,” she wrote. “Those arms were not mine. She’s next to me in this picture.” Holman, who has three kids of her own, wrote that while watching women experience problems with fertility and learning about their past miscarriages she also learned how tough these women who were once s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Recurrent pregnancy loss ( repeated miscarriages or habitual abortions) is one of the most frustrating problems in medicine. It is hard for patients , because getting pregnant , and then losing the baby again and again is traumatic. It's bad for doctors, because patients have so many questions , and we don't have any answers ! The truth is that our tests are not very good, and there is little we can do to make n accurate a diagnosis. This is why, in about 80% of patients with recurrent pregnancy loss , inspite of extensive testing, we will not be able to find an underlying cause.Based on experience over many years, the one...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: IVF miscarriage recurrent abortions recurrent miscarriage recurrent pregnancy loss Source Type: blogs
A powerful photo series is highlighting the anguish of infertility. Las Vegas photographer Abbie Fox captured stunning images of local optician Victoria Hamilton to illustrate the painful journeys they’ve followed in their personal lives. Both women have struggled with infertility. Fox had a miscarriage last March after two healthy pregnancies and births and was eventually diagnosed with PCOS, which dashed her dream of having four children.  “We have two amazing children and after this last year I have sort of given up the idea of having another child,” Fox told HuffPost. “It just wasn&rsq...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
By Katrina Mark, MD 1. Fertility naturally declines as we age That alone doesn’t mean you should start to worry. The general advice I give a woman is if she has been trying to become pregnant for a full year with no luck, she might consider a fertility evaluation. For a woman over age 35, she might consider it after six months. If a woman is younger and has irregular periods, it’s likely she isn’t regularly ovulating, so she might want to be evaluated sooner. 2. Sometimes there’s a reason for infertility – and sometimes, there’s not There are some things we know cause infertility. About...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Health Tips Women's Health fertility Katrina Mark obgyn UMMC Source Type: blogs
This study shows that lifespan-extending conditions can slow molecular changes associated with an epigenetic clock in mice livers. Diverse interventions that extend mouse lifespan suppress shared age-associated epigenetic changes at critical gene regulatory regions Age-associated epigenetic changes are implicated in aging. Notably, age-associated DNA methylation changes comprise a so-called aging "clock", a robust biomarker of aging. However, while genetic, dietary and drug interventions can extend lifespan, their impact on the epigenome is uncharacterised. To fill this knowledge gap, we defined...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Most women know that their fertility declines as they get older because they run out of eggs. It's true that life is unfair - while men continue producing sperm all their life,  women are born with whatever eggs they're ever going to have, which means they never produce any new eggs after birth.Sometimes women find this confusing, because don't they produce an egg every month? Isn't that called ovulation? The truth is that the egg which you ovulate every month was actually manufactured when you were a baby fetus in your mother's womb. This egg is  recruited after years of dormancy , and it matures and is released...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
It breaks my heart when I see how IVF clinics cheat their patients.  Patients do IVF treatment with a lot of expectations .  However, because patients are not well informed , it's very easy for unscrupulous IVF doctors to fool them.Many clinics paint a rosy picture to attract patients. At the time of the first consultation, the “brand name doctor” is very sweet and obliging. When they are trying to “sell” their services to the patient, they inflate their success rates,  and talk about pregnancy rates of “ between 40% to 50% “ . They have no actual proof of this – and...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
I never faced any major disappointments in my life, be it my family, friends, education or career, the first time i experienced one was in the form of miscarriage of an early pregnancy immediately after marriage and then never conceiving naturally  for several  years thereafter . It was emotionally very draining to accept that life can be so harsh on you. There is always an expectation that since i conceived  once, it may happen once again naturally. But all the efforts went without any positive results .I started thinking of medical options, initially i did not understand the significance of choice of docto...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
When Macy Rodeffer learned that she was pregnant, she decided to announce the news with a photo that acknowledged her long journey with IVF. The mom-to-be posted an Instagram photo of her IVF medication in the shape of a heart around an ultrasound photo and onesie that says "Worth the Wait and Wait and Wait." "I knew that my announcement would hurt women still waiting for their baby, because I've been there before myself," Rodeffer told The Huffington Post. "It was important to me that my announcement not only convey my joy, but also share my struggle and encourage women not to give up."...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
IVF Isn't About the Journey, It's About the Destination While some women may share their birth stories, I wanted to share our fertility story. Translating my mind's weavings into words on paper has helped me weather numerous storms, but throughout 2015 -- a year marred by a lot of heartbreak and too many hormonal injections -- when I've needed this kind of therapy the most, I maintained silence on a subject that hit me like a piece of fallen scaffolding. Instead, I relied heavily on the physical support of my husband, family and friends, all for whom I am extremely grateful. With each setback along this grueling and at ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Lee Rubin Collins had her first baby in the mid 1990s, and the whole experience was such a joy, she says, she and her husband immediately said, "Let's keep doing this!" They got pregnant easily the first time around, so she was surprised when they tried and tried... and nothing happened. Ultimately, it took two years of fertility treatment, five cycles of in vitro fertilization, and one miscarriage before Collins was able to have another child, making her one of the millions of women in the United States who face secondary infertility -- a condition that is seemingly as misunderstood as it is common. In honor of ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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