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Long, Intense Exercise Linked To Lower Libido In Men

(Reuters Health) ― Men who routinely do unusually intense or long workouts may be less likely to have a normal libido than their peers who don’t work out so hard, a recent study suggests.Even though being overweight and sedentary has long been tied to low sex drive, or libido, some previous research has also linked endurance workouts like marathon training or long distance cycling to reduced levels of the male sex hormone testosterone and lower libido.For the current study, researchers examined survey data on exercise habits and libido for 1,077 healthy men. Compared to men with the most intense exercise regimens, men with the lowest intensity workouts were almost 7 times more likely to have a normal or high libido, the study found.Similarly, men who spent the least time on exercise were about four times more likely to have a high or normal libido as men who devoted the most time to training.”Our study is the first to examine the influence of large volumes of exercise training over a period of years,” said lead study author Dr. Anthony Hackney, a researcher in exercise physiology and nutrition at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.The study isn’t a controlled experiment designed to prove that intense exercise lowers libido or why this might occur. But low testosterone after years of hard-core training is a likely culprit, Hackney said by email.”Our goal and research question was not to examine how to boost men’s libido, but to ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Male infertility has multiple etiologies, many of which are treatable. Recent reports have demonstrated the deleterious impact of obesity on male fertility. Obese men often experience hypogonadism, typically secondary to hyperestrogenemia. This is presumably due to increased aromatase activity in body fat, resulting in impaired hormone and sperm production. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of anastrazole on semen profiles in infertile men with hyperestrogenemia.
Source: The Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Infertility: Therapy II Source Type: research
Men and women follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and can undergo important and sometime startling hormonal changes. Though results vary with stage of life—young adults, middle-aged, older—there are a variety of hormonal changes that women and men typically experience, some in concert, others independently. Such hormonal shifts can be powerful and part of the health-restoring menu of changes that develop with this lifestyle. They can even improve a relationship in a number of ways, both physically and emotionally, especially if we weave in some of the newer Wheat Belly/Undoctored concepts and practices such as oxy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle estradiol estrogen hormonal hormones Inflammation low-carb oxytocin testosterone Thyroid Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Abstract Congenital Leptin receptor (LEPR) deficiency is a rare genetic cause of early-onset morbid obesity characterised by severe early onset obesity, major hyperphagia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and immune and neuroendocrine/metabolic dysfunction. We identified a homozygous loss-of-function mutation, NM_002303.5:c.464 T > G; p.(Tyr155*), in the LEPR in an extended consanguineous family with multiple individuals affected by early-onset severe obesity and hyperphagia. Interestingly, the LEPR-deficient adult females have extremely high body mass index (BMI) with hypogonadal infertility, the B...
Source: European Journal of Medical Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Eur J Med Genet Source Type: research
Summary In a case‐controlled study, we assessed the expressed seminal NAD‐dependent protein deacetylase (SIRT1) expression in infertile oligoasthenoteratozoospermic (OAT) men associated with varicocoele. Our study involved 81 men, recruited from the University hospitals, after ethical approval and informed consent. They were allocated into fertile normozoospermic men (n = 23), infertile OAT men without varicocoele (n = 23) and infertile OAT men with varicocoele (n = 35). Inclusion criteria consisted of confirmation of abnormal semen parameters and normal female partners whereas exclusion c...
Source: Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: MetS shows an important association with common male urogenital disorders such as benign prostatic enlargement, lower urinary tract symptoms, erectile dysfunction, infertility and renal disease. MetS affects male urogenital system mainly through endocrine and vascular mechanisms. Obesity, hypogonadism, obesity-induced androgen deficiency, hyperinsulinemia and inflammation are the mechanisms commonly involved and may act as potential targets for MetS-male urogenital system interrelations. Future studies are needed to evaluate the therapeutic approaches for intervention in MetS-male urogenital disease relations. ...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
Conclusions: Concentrations of MnBP, MBzP and MEHP similar to those found in the urine of pregnant women consistently altered hCG and PPARγ expression in primary placental cells. These findings provide evidence for the molecular basis by which phthalates may alter placental function, and they provide a preliminary mechanistic hypothesis for opposite responses by sex. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1539 Received: 23 December 2016 Revised: 6 September 2017 Accepted: 18 September 2017 Published: 31 October 2017 Address correspondence to J.J. Adibi, 130 Desoto Street, Parran Hall 5132, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA. Telephone...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
This article reviews pathophysiological mechanisms, observational studies, and clinical implications of testosterone therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID: 28831925 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
Purpose of review: The prevalence of obesity has risen steadily for the past 35 years and presently affects more than a third of the US population. A concurrent decline in semen parameters has been described, and a growing body of literature suggests that obesity contributes to the male infertility. The purpose of this review is to examine the effects of obesity on male fertility, the mechanisms by which impaired reproductive health arise, and the outcomes of treatment. Recent findings: Obesity alters the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis both centrally and peripherally, resulting in hypogonadotropic, hypere...
Source: Current Opinion in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: OBESITY AND ITS IMPACT ON UROLOGICAL DISEASE: Edited by Richard K. Lee and Christian Seitz Source Type: research
This article systematically introduces the basic knowledge of aromatase and provides information of the current advances relating to aromatase in male reproductive function. Increasing our knowledge on the role of aromatase in male obesity could help in proposing new approaches to treat infertile men. [...] © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New YorkArticle in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text
Source: Hormone and Metabolic Research - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Summary Recently, the cohort of men from the European Male Ageing Study has been stratified into different categories distinguishing primary, secondary and compensated hypogonadism. A similar classification has not yet been applied to the infertile population. We performed a cross‐sectional study enrolling 786 consecutive Caucasian‐European infertile men segregated into eugonadal [normal serum total testosterone (≥3.03 ng/mL) and normal luteinizing hormone (≤9.4 mU/mL)], secondary (low total testosterone, low/normal luteinizing hormone), primary (low total testosterone, elevated luteinizing hormone) and...
Source: Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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