Long, Intense Exercise Linked To Lower Libido In Men

(Reuters Health) ― Men who routinely do unusually intense or long workouts may be less likely to have a normal libido than their peers who don’t work out so hard, a recent study suggests.Even though being overweight and sedentary has long been tied to low sex drive, or libido, some previous research has also linked endurance workouts like marathon training or long distance cycling to reduced levels of the male sex hormone testosterone and lower libido.For the current study, researchers examined survey data on exercise habits and libido for 1,077 healthy men. Compared to men with the most intense exercise regimens, men with the lowest intensity workouts were almost 7 times more likely to have a normal or high libido, the study found.Similarly, men who spent the least time on exercise were about four times more likely to have a high or normal libido as men who devoted the most time to training.”Our study is the first to examine the influence of large volumes of exercise training over a period of years,” said lead study author Dr. Anthony Hackney, a researcher in exercise physiology and nutrition at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.The study isn’t a controlled experiment designed to prove that intense exercise lowers libido or why this might occur. But low testosterone after years of hard-core training is a likely culprit, Hackney said by email.”Our goal and research question was not to examine how to boost men’s libido, but to ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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by Iyad H. Manaserh, Lakshmikanth Chikkamenahalli, Samyuktha Ravi, Prabhatchandra R. Dube, Joshua J. Park, Jennifer W. Hill Insulin resistance and obesity are associated with reduced gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release and infertility. Mice that lack insulin receptors (IRs) throughout development in both neuronal and non-neuronal brain cells are known to exhibit subfertility due to hypogonadotropic hypogonadi sm. However, attempts to recapitulate this phenotype by targeting specific neurons have failed. To determine whether astrocytic insulin sensing plays a role in the regulation of fertility, we generated mice...
Source: PLoS Biology: Archived Table of Contents - Category: Biology Authors: Source Type: research
Klinefelter syndrome (KS), in which subjects have additional copies of X chromosomes, is the most common male sex chromosome abnormality, with a prevalence of 1 in 660 and an incidence of about 1 in 500-700 newborns. Its sign and symptoms include infertility, generally low testosterone levels, and an increased prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Epicardial fat thickness (EFT) reflects visceral adiposity rather than general obesity.
Source: Metabolism - Clinical and Experimental - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Muffin tops, man boobs, and bagel bumps: These are among the varied and perverse ways that the hormonal distortions inflicted on unwitting humans who consume the seeds of grasses, i.e., grains, show themselves. In our modern world filled with thousands of processed foods, there are plenty of landmines for health. Gummy bears and gumdrops will rot teeth, for instance. Indulge in a handful of dried prunes and you’ll have to schedule a substantial portion of your day on the toilet due to bowel irritants. But only wheat and grains are associated with a wide swath of health problems that range from autoimmune disease to m...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates grain-free gynecomastia man boobs man breasts testosterone undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Because it has become such a frequent item in everyday meals, suggesting that something so commonplace must be fine, people often ask: Is wheat really that bad? Let’s therefore catalog the health conditions that are associated with wheat consumption. Health conditions we know with 100% certainty are caused by consumption of wheat and related grains: Celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, cerebellar ataxia, “idiopathic” peripheral neuropathy, temporal lobe seizures, gluten encephalopathy, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, tooth decay Health conditions ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates autoimmune diabetes gluten-free grain-free grains wheat wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is of frequent occurrence in Saudi females and is often associated with obesity, insulin resistance, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and infertility. Since these features are ...
Source: BMC Women's Health - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Authors: Tsang SH, Aycinena ARP, Sharma T Abstract Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive disease with a prevalence of about 1/125,000. The syndrome involves mixed rod-cone dystrophy (which becomes obvious by 6 years of age). About two thirds of patients have postaxial polydactyly, and sometimes syndactyly, brachydactyly, and/or clinodactyly may be present. Hypogonadism and renal involvement occur in about 40%, mental retardation in about 50%, and truncal obesity in about 70%; it is present early, along with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Vision becomes ma...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
igi L Abstract It is universally accepted that lifestyle interventions are the first step towards a good overall, reproductive and sexual health. Cessation of unhealthy habits, such as tobacco, alcohol and drug use, poor nutrition and sedentary behavior, is suggested in order to preserve/improve fertility in humans. However, the possible risks of physical exercise per se or sports on male fertility are less known. Being "fit" does not only improve the sense of well-being, but also has beneficial effects on general health: in fact physical exercise is by all means a low-cost, high-efficacy method for prev...
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reprod Biol Endocrinol Source Type: research
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Source: Steroids - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Male infertility has multiple etiologies, many of which are treatable. Recent reports have demonstrated the deleterious impact of obesity on male fertility. Obese men often experience hypogonadism, typically secondary to hyperestrogenemia. This is presumably due to increased aromatase activity in body fat, resulting in impaired hormone and sperm production. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of anastrazole on semen profiles in infertile men with hyperestrogenemia.
Source: The Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Infertility: Therapy II Source Type: research
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