Preparing to Show Up: Nature Practices that Serve

This article offers some very basic nature-based practices that we can use on a regular —if not frequent—basis with little preparation in moments in which we find ourselves: depleted, enervated, or in need of clarity. I have been a hospice volunteer for more than sixteen years, while also serving the deep needs of people in transition through my private professional practice. What I’ve learned from both of these endeavors is that showing up to “the other” in an engaged, dynamic manner is not only essential for them; I must show up to myself in such a way, too. We need to maintain a daily connection to fluidity in our lives.The series of articles I offer to readers of the Pallimed blog addresses precisely this; the piece you ’re reading now focuses on ways in which we can remain vibrant via the natural world. They are not intended as a panacea, but rather as touchstones of nature as balm. Each can be done quickly, at the center of our busy workday. These practices can also be used, with modifications, directly in our daily interactions with those we serve. They are totally malleable: adaptable to specific needs and desires, flexible per the conditions in which you work and live. I recommend opening up a pause in your schedule and routine. These practices don’t have to take a long time or detract from our respo nsibilities. I have done many of these within moments of my next client appointment, or around the corner from the next hospice...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: hospice intervention Jennifer Wilhoit nature reflect self care Self reflection volunteer Source Type: blogs

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CONCLUSIONS: Since the introduction of SAE the authors have avoided emergency radiotherapy, surgery, and repeat vaginal packing in patients with intractable vaginal bleeding due to gynaecological cancer. Patients were discharged to their appropriate treatment pathways in a timely manner. The authors recommend the application of SAE. PMID: 29787023 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Journal of Gynaecological Oncology - Category: OBGYN Tags: Eur J Gynaecol Oncol Source Type: research
This study shows the importance of differential diagnosis during the oncologic monitoring of cervical cancer patients to avoid unnecessary treatments at the expense of better therapeutic options. PMID: 29787017 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Journal of Gynaecological Oncology - Category: OBGYN Tags: Eur J Gynaecol Oncol Source Type: research
Conclusion The Perroca scale is a tool to identify patients with greater need for care and the possible prognosis for hospitalized patients.
Source: Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP - Category: Nursing Source Type: research
Abstract Ionizing radiation affects the metabolism of key proteins of extracellular matrix including type III collagen, an important component of human skin. The aim of the work is an analysis of the impact of radical and palliative radiotherapy on collagen type III synthesis in patients with head and neck cancer. The test group consisted of 56 males with histopathologically confirmed head and neck cancer, for whom radiotherapy was applied as a form of radical or palliative treatment. The level of procollagen III aminoterminal propeptide (PIIINP), which is a marker of collagen type III synthesis, was determined in...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
The tragic case of Alfie Evans has roiled Great Britain and the world. Alfie was a two-year-old child in the United Kingdom with an unknown degenerative brain disease who eventually deteriorated to the point that he required life support. His brain had become mostly liquid, and he could not see, speak, or hear. Alder Hey Hospital decided his condition was terminal and irreversible and wanted to stop further treatment. His parents disagreed and wanted to transfer care to another hospital in Italy that was willing to accept him. Alder Hey went to court arguing that it was better that the child be allowed to die because keepi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Policy Hospital-Based Medicine Palliative Care Source Type: blogs
Authors: Cochofel A, Cardoso A, Tapley M PMID: 29790464 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Acta Medica Portuguesa - Category: General Medicine Tags: Acta Med Port Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Department: TRANSITIONS: Issues in palliative and end-of-life care Source Type: research
Authors: Swarm RA, Dans M Abstract The NCCN Framework aims to provide adapted guidelines for low- and middle-resource countries to improve the experience of patients with cancer. In particular, the NCCN Frameworks for Adult Cancer Pain and Palliative Care and were designed to help expand access to pain management and palliative care for patients in low-resource countries. The NCCN Framework is one of several tools that can improve cancer care in the developing world. The NCCN Harmonized Guidelines for Sub-Saharan Africa, a collaborative effort between NCCN, American Cancer Society, Clinton Health Access Initiative,...
Source: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: J Natl Compr Canc Netw Source Type: research
Authors: Smith MA, Cho K, Rodgers P Abstract Topical analgesics are effective and alternative means to systemic therapy, often minimizing the adverse drug effects and complications of systemic analgesic use. Despite the number of available topical analgesics, there is little direction provided in practice guidelines on their appropriate use and little is known about patterns of their prescribing. To begin understanding these knowledge gaps, we sought provider perspectives on topical analgesic use at a large academic medical center. This electronic survey seeks to explore the perceptions and prescription patterns of...
Source: Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy - Category: Palliative Care Tags: J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother Source Type: research
Palliative care is a proven approach to enhance quality of life and care both for people with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) [1] and those with lung cancer [2], and it is encouraged to start palliative care early in the disease trajectory [3, 4]. Similar symptoms occur in both diseases, such as pain, insomnia, fatigue, low mood and dyspnoea [5], with a study reporting even worse physical and emotional functioning for COPD than for lung cancer [6]. These symptoms signal palliative care needs [6], and require treatment focused on symptom management and psychosocial support for more than just the terminal...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Articles: Research letters Source Type: research
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