Novel, Immune Therapies Promising in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

Treatment of keratinocyte carcinomas such as basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors and targeted agents warrant further investigation, according to recently published studies.
Source: CancerNetwork - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: News Skin Cancer (Nonmelanoma) Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: Dermatological follow-up is important in OTRs, due to the higher risk of tumors and mainly NMSC. Clinical and environmental factors, including cigarette smoking, are useful in characterizing OTR with higher risk of NMSC. PMID: 30251802 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia - Category: Dermatology Tags: G Ital Dermatol Venereol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated the increased risk of skin cancer in transplant patients during the first 7 years of follow-up and made the dermatologists aware about the need of a regular cutaneous follow up for this subset of patients. PMID: 30229636 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia - Category: Dermatology Tags: G Ital Dermatol Venereol Source Type: research
Opinion statementDermatoscopy (dermoscopy) improves the diagnosis of benign and malignant cutaneous neoplasms in comparison with examination with the unaided eye and should be used routinely for all pigmented and non-pigmented cutaneous neoplasms. It is especially useful for the early stage of melanoma when melanoma-specific criteria are invisible to the unaided eye. Preselection by the unaided eye is therefore not recommended. The increased availability of polarized dermatoscopes, and the extended use of dermatoscopy in non-pigmented lesions led to the discovery of new criteria, and we recommend that lesions should be exa...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Cutaneous Squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is after basal cell carcinoma the second most common non-melanoma skin cancer and accounts for 20% of all cutaneous malignancies [1]. Particularly effected are organ transplant recipients (OTRs) with a 65 to 250 higher risk than the general population due to their immunosuppression as major risk factor [2]. Moreover, cSCC in OTRs are often quite aggressive with high recurrence rates, metastasis and death [3]. The most widely used agents to prevent graft rejection in solid OTRs are calcineurin-inhibitors in combination with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and corticosteroids as the stand...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the two most common skin cancers found in humans. These cancers can acquire drug resistance and pose considerable medical burdens to clinics and patients if left untreated. Two recent studies show that active Hippo signaling plays a critical role in initiating BCC and SCC tumorigenesis, providing new opportunities to develop therapies against these skin malignancies.
Source: EMBO Journal - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Cancer, Signal Transduction News [amp ] Views Source Type: research
In conclusion, dermoscopy is valuable for the diagnosis of CNH as a first screening tool because of a consistent global dermoscopic configuration (daisy pattern), consisting of radially arranged white thick lines surroun ding a central rounded yellow/brown clod.
Source: Archives of Dermatological Research - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in the white population worldwide. It is divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common subtypes of NMSC and it is estimated that 2-3 million new cases occur globally each year. Malignant melanoma is the least common skin cancer; however, it is the most fatal one its incidence is alarmingly increasing. According to worldwide trends, skin cancer is the most prevalent malignancy in Colombia, by 2010 reached up to 20.2% of all cancer cases attended.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Perineural invasion (PNI) is a mechanism of neoplastic growth and spread that occurs in and around nerves as a means of minimal resistance. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are among the most common cutaneous tumors known to take advantage of this phenomenon. Moreover, tumors that exhibit PNI are at higher risk for distant metastases, and are associated with an increased rate of recurrence, morbidity, and mortality. The link between PNI and invasive techniques such as cryosurgery has been proposed, but studies are limited.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Introduction: Approximately 3 million Americans are diagnosed and treated annually with nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Traditionally these cancers are diagnosed by shave biopsy or punch biopsy. Although shave biopsy is often used in diagnosis of NMSC, limited data exists regarding the persistence of residual tumor at the time of definitive treatment, such as excision. Literature suggests that 15%-40% of the time residual NMSC is not found at the time of excision following shave biopsy.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Nonmelanoma skin cancer represents the most common malignancy in the United States, and the incidence is increasing. In the United States alone, average annual treatment costs are in the billions. Although basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is considered the most common skin cancer, recent studies suggest the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has increased creating a SCC:BCC ratio of 1.0. Many treatment modalities are used for SCC including Mohs micrographic surgery, but there are currently no FDA-approved topical therapies for SCCs.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
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