Study: Hormone replacement therapy may help improve women's heart health, overall survival

(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center) Hormone replacement therapy has long been controversial as studies have associated it with health benefits and risks. While some studies suggest that it lowers the risk of osteoporosis and improves some aspects of heart health, others link it to higher risk of cancer and stroke. Now, a new imaging study suggests that women using hormone replacement therapy to relieve menopause symptoms face a lower risk of death and show lower levels of atherosclerosis compared to women who do not use hormone therapy.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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Conclusions World population is aging and the increase in life expectancy is often unhealthy. In particular, musculoskeletal aging, which leads to sarcopenia and osteoporosis, has several causes such as changes in body composition, inflammation, and hormonal imbalance. Sarcopenia, osteoporosis, and more frequently, sarcopenic obesity are commonly associated with aging and frequently closely linked each other, often leading to the development of a frailty syndrome. Frailty syndrome favors an increased risk of loss function in daily activities, for cardiovascular diseases, cancers, falls, and mortality. As the number of eld...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Our panel this morning discussed the issues surrounding how the WHI results were interpreted and communicated to women and their health care providers. We recognize that hormones are not appropriate for all women, and look forward to hosting a future panel that highlights alternatives. The speakers have a variety of backgrounds and experiences (and genders), and we aim to promote diversity of voices. This was not normal breakfast conversation. Today was a jolting – and disruptive – talk about what happens to women’s bodies when they age. (Who knew that if you’re menopausal and you don’t take y...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs
An excerpt from my new book Undoctored. This one little tale about hormonal health of human females, pregnant horses, and drug patents paints a microcosm of the bigger healthcare picture. It is an example of how when money becomes the primary goal, health may not be served. For years, physicians prescribed estrogen hormone replacement for women experiencing menopause, believing that drugs like Premarin, manufactured by harvesting estrogens from the urine of pregnant horses, prevented osteoporosis, improved cholesterol values, and reduced cardiovascular risk, since preliminary epidemiological studies, not real clinical stud...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Drugs Undoctored Source Type: blogs
About Early Menopause The average age a woman goes into menopause is 51. Menopause is considered abnormal when it begins before the age of 40 and is called “premature ovarian failure.” Common symptoms that come with menopause include hot flashes, night sweats, sleep problems, sexual issues, vaginal dryness, pain during sex, pelvic floor disorders (urine, bowel leakage, pelvic organ prolapse), losing bone mass, and mood swings. Menopause is mostly genetically predetermined, which means you generally can’t do much to delay it from happening. What we can do is work to counter-balance or prevent the symptoms ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Health Tips Women's Health diet and exercise early menopause tatiana sanses Source Type: blogs
Authors: Parish SJ, Gillespie JA Abstract This review describes the evolving role of oral hormone therapy (HT) for treating menopausal symptoms and preventing osteoporosis, focusing on conjugated estrogens/bazedoxifene (CE/BZA). Estrogens alleviate hot flushes and prevent bone loss associated with menopause. In nonhysterectomized women, a progestin should be added to estrogens to reduce the risk of endometrial cancer. Use of HT declined since the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) studies showed that HT does not prevent coronary heart disease (CHD) and that conjugated estrogens/medroxyprogesterone acetate increased th...
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Women with intolerable menopausal symptoms may wish to weigh the benefits of symptom relief against the small absolute risk of harm arising from short-term use of low-dose HT, provided they do not have specific contraindications. HT may be unsuitable for some women, including those at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, increased risk of thromboembolic disease (such as those with obesity or a history of venous thrombosis) or increased risk of some types of cancer (such as breast cancer, in women with a uterus). The risk of endometrial cancer among women with a uterus taking oestrogen-only HT is well docu...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
By now, most people have been to a holiday party or two. Lots of food, lots of eggnog and other carb laden alcoholic beverages, and lots of grazing all day long on all the boxes of candy friends and business acquaintances sent to us. It's easy to gain the five pounds most people gain during the holidays, and in the process, raise your blood sugar or glucose levels too high. That's your body letting you know you have prediabetes (higher than normal but still below diabetes levels) or diabetes, and unless you take action soon, your body won't like it. Diabetes silently sneaks up on you and if untreated, slowly weakens your ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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