Cross-Cultural Translation, Adaptation and Reliability of the Danish M. D. Andeson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

The objectives were to translate and culturally adapt the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) into Danish and subsequently test the reliability of the Danish version. The MDADI was translated into Danish and cross culturally adapted through cognitive interviews. The final version was test –retest evaluated in a group of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients who responded to the questionnaire twice with a mean of eight days apart. Interclass correlation coefficient, Cronbach’s alpha, floor and ceiling effects, standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change were investig ated. Fourteen patients were interviewed on the comprehensibility of the Danish MDADI, and all found the questionnaire meaningful, easy to understand, non-offensive and to include relevant aspects of dysphagia related to HNC. Sixty-four patients were included in the test–retest study. Especially, one item in the emotional scale (E7) appeared to be often misinterpreted, and ceiling effects were found in all four subdomains (global, emotional, functional and physical). The four subdomains and the composite score showed acceptable test–retest reliability and internal consistency in a Danish p opulation of HNC patients. The Danish MDADI is reliable in terms of internal consistency and test–retest reproducibility and can be used in assessing the health-related quality of life in head and neck cancer patients with dysphagia.
Source: Dysphagia - Category: Speech Therapy Source Type: research

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ConclusionsHyoid ORN should remain in the differential during diagnostic workup of previously irradiated head and neck cancer patients. The presentation of a pharyngocutaneous fistula should prompt workup to rule out malignancy before assigning a diagnosis of ORN.
Source: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusion Chinese HNC survivors experienced a variety of unmet SCNs, particularly in the areas of symptom management and healthcare system and information provision. Implications for Practice The study provides insights that can (1) inform future service development, including regular symptom identification and management, improvements in communication, and counseling services and (2) identify the specific needs of these survivors as the basis for tailoring care to meet their needs.
Source: Cancer Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: ARTICLES Source Type: research
Conclusion The PAfitME protocol is ready for additional testing in a randomized clinical trial. Implications for Practice The PAfitME intervention is a nurse-led nonpharmacological intervention. It can be integrated into home care or telehealth care for HNC patients at the end of their cancer treatment once effectiveness is established.
Source: Cancer Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: ARTICLES: ONLINE ONLY Source Type: research
AbstractHigh dose of radiation to bone may cause necrosis. Osteoradionecrosis of the cervical vertebrae is a rare adverse event of radiotherapy in patients treated for head and neck cancer. The risk on osteoradionecrosis will increase with doses exceeding 60  Gy. Minimal trauma of the overlying mucosa of the heavily irradiated cervical spine causes subsequent infections or instability may cause neck pain and severe neurological disability. In four patients the cervical spine received up to 100 Gy due to reirradiation. Clinically the patients presented with neck pain. All patients had defects in the pharyngeal pos...
Source: Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis is the first study to describe HNC survivors ’ attempts to integrate self-management into their daily lives following primary treatment. The findings indicate that HNC survivors exhibit highly individualised approaches to self-management integration and abandon self-management strategies that fail to meet their own specific needs.Implications for Cancer SurvivorsSurvivors may benefit from skills training and structured support to assist their transition between in-patient care and having to self-manage after primary treatment, and/or ongoing support to deal with persistent and recurring challenges suc...
Source: Journal of Cancer Survivorship - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conditions:   Head and Neck Cancer;   Squamous Cell Carcinoma Intervention:   Drug: Cetuximab Sponsors:   University of Wisconsin, Madison;   National Cancer Institute (NCI);   National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Head and Neck Cancer Intervention:   Radiation: Temporally Feathered Radiation Therapy (TFRT) Sponsor:   Case Comprehensive Cancer Center Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conditions:   Head and Neck Cancer;   Squamous Cell Carcinoma Intervention:   Drug: Cetuximab Sponsors:   University of Wisconsin, Madison;   National Cancer Institute (NCI);   National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Head and Neck Cancer Intervention:   Radiation: Temporally Feathered Radiation Therapy (TFRT) Sponsor:   Case Comprehensive Cancer Center Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conclusion The spectrum of [18F]HX4 uptake in this small series of patients exemplifies the difference in oxygenation profiles between histologically similar tumours. Performing an additional PET scan with [18F]HX4 prior to chemoradiotherapy treatment was logistically challenging in a routine setting, and therefore validation of its clinical impact should be the focus of future studies [EudraCT number 2013-003563-58].
Source: Nuclear Medicine Communications - Category: Nuclear Medicine Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLES Source Type: research
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