Vaccine Hesitancy: In Search of the Risk Communication Comfort Zone

Conclusions There are some limitations to this study worth noting. First, although the online panel used for our survey is constructed to be representative of the Canadian population in terms of age, region of residence, income and education, selection bias and non-response bias cannot be ruled out. However, the sociodemographic characteristics of our respondents are not significantly different from those of the Canadian population of parents with children aged 5 and younger. Second, the MMR vaccination decision for the child was self-reported by parents which could lead to recall bias, and there was no other measure within the study to assess parental vaccine hesitancy attitudes along a broader spectrum. Hence, as most respondents reported that their child was vaccinated, their reflections on the standard communication messages used by public health to persuade parents about the benefits of vaccination, as well as those suggestions provided by parents that could be persuasive in encouraging parents to vaccinate their children, cannot be expected as being effective specifically for vaccine hesitant parents. Relatedly, messaging deemed to be more acceptable by anti-vaccination parents – namely, public health messaging that both strongly recommends childhood vaccinations while equally expressing empathy and compassion for parental choice – needs further empirical testing, either in an experimental design or through intensive qualitative research. Despite these limi...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research

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In conclusion, aluminium phosphate nanoparticles were stabilised by particular amino acids and induced an adjuvant effect comparable to that of aluminium phosphate microparticles.Graphical abstract
Source: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Abstract The underlying molecular basis for neurodevelopmental or neuropsychiatric disorders is not known. In contrast, mechanistic understanding of other brain disorders including neurodegeneration has advanced considerably. Yet, these do not approach the knowledge accrued for many cancers with precision therapeutics acting on well-characterized targets. Although the identification of genes responsible for neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders remains a major obstacle, the few causally associated genes are ripe for discovery by focusing efforts to dissect their mechanisms. Here, we make a case for del...
Source: CNS Neuroscience and Therapeutics - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: CNS Neurosci Ther Source Type: research
This study is a report of the prevalence of influenza infection in the population of children up to the age of 14 years and of the type of influenza virus involved during the 2017/18 epidemic season in Poland. We found that influenza A and B viruses co-dominated in the season. Among the influenza A viruses, A/H1N1/ pdm09 subtype was a more frequent source of infection than A/H3N2/ subtype. In addition, the prevalence of infection was re-analyzed in children stratified into the age groups of 0-4, 5-9, and 10-14 years old. We found a relation between the age of a child and the type of influenza virus causing infect...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
I'm contemplating moving my Day 2 about 2 weeks after my Day 1. Mainly because I'm struggling to find time outside of work to do UW questions and at my current rate of studying, I won't be able to work through the CCS cases and familiarize myself with the software. I know people say it only takes a few days to review CCS and the software, but my anxiety right now is not going to allow all that cramming. Also I get extreme post-test fatigue, need several days to recuperate, and cannot even... Step 3 day 1 vs day 2... take it separately? biostats?
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Step III Source Type: forums
Publication date: Available online 15 June 2019Source: Respiratory Medicine Case ReportsAuthor(s): Andrew R. Deitchman, Or Kalchiem-Dekel, Nevins Todd, Robert M. ReedAbstractThe association between inflammatory myopathies anti-synthetase syndrome and interstitial lung disease has been recognized since the 1950s. Patients generally present with gradual onset of symptoms and slow progression of fibrosis over months to years. Herein, we describe a previously well 51-year-old man who presented with three months of progressive small joint arthritis, cough, dyspnea, and eventually hypoxemic respiratory failure following a viral ...
Source: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 June 2019Source: Journal of Environmental PsychologyAuthor(s): Amber KaleAbstractImportant people-place relationships are often severed during forced displacement, leading many refugees to feel a sense of loss, grief, and disorientation which can negatively impact upon their wellbeing and hinder their resettlement in a new country. Whilst there is an extensive body of literature concerning the negative impact that displacement can have on the lives of individuals and diasporic communities, there has been much less focus on how former refugees might cope with their loss and enhance thei...
Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
[Daily News] The government has warned members of the public to be on the alert following an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and recently reported in neighbouring Uganda, stressing that it has intensified measures against the deadly viral disease.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
A simple shift in body language can change how we are perceived. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Body Language subscribers-only Source Type: blogs
MEDICAL experts are calling for booster MMR jabs for young adults after figures show a big rise in cases of mumps.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
These traits are all linked to having higher intelligence.  → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Intelligence Personality Source Type: blogs
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