This Warmer-Than-Average Weather Isn't Great News For Our Health

Spring is in the air a little earlier this year, but don’t go celebrating just yet. This year’s weather is shattering norms. Washington, D.C., for example, not only had the warmest February on record, but last month’s temps already surpassed the average records for March, too. The situation is similar for a lot of other spots across the country, and that could be bad news when it comes to public health. Experts theorize climate change may be part of the cause of this year’s early spring phenomenon, and warn the overall warming of the planet can have physical and mental health consequences. Below are just a few ways the rising temperatures can take a toll on our wellbeing.  An earlier spring could lead to an increase in illness. When the weather is colder, the chances of mosquito or other critter-borne illnesses is lower, since the insects don’t typically thrive in the cold. Experts are concerned that the early spring could impact the spread of illnesses like Zika and Lyme disease, Time reported earlier this week. Flooding from rains and premature snow melting could also contribute to this issue. “An overall warming trend opens up the chance for [ticks and mosquitoes] to live in new places and to stay alive for longer periods of time,” Aaron Bernstein, associate director of the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health Center for Health and the Global Environment, told the publication. Hotter temperature...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 16 October 2019Source: Journal of the American College of RadiologyAuthor(s): Cindy Yuan, Kirti Kulkarni, Brittany Z. DashevskyAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the impact of comorbid conditions and age on mammography use.MethodsWe used data from the 2011 to 2015 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, which contained records for 40,752 women over the age of 40. Use was defined as a mammogram within the previous 1 or 2 years, analyzed separately. A logit model was employed to evaluate associations between use and comorbidities and age. Statistical significance was defined by a P value
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 7 October 2019Source: Pathology - Research and PracticeAuthor(s): Dominik Gross, Christina LaursAbstractThe Jewish pathologist Carl Julius Rothberger (1871–1945) is undoubtedly one of the most important representatives of his field. His studies on atrial fibrillation, the bundle branch block and arrhythmia perpetua in particular secured him a place in medical history. Rothberger also gave the name to an agar used to prove the neutral red reduction of salmonella (Rothberger-Scheffler agar).While Rothberger’s name is well known in pathology, his biography and his experiences of ...
Source: Pathology Research and Practice - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
Authors: Pincus T, Schmukler J, Castrejon I Abstract A patient history generally provides the most important information in diagnosis and management of patients with most rheumatic diseases, including osteoarthritis (OA). Patient history components can be expressed as quantitative, structured, "scientific" data, rather than "subjective" narrative descriptions, using patient self-report questionnaires. The Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) questionnaire is used in all OA clinical trials, and the health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) in all rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials, as "diseas...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Authors: Hawker GA Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis, affecting 1 in 3 people over age 65 and women more so than men. The prevalence of OA is rising due, in part, to the increasing prevalence of OA risk factors, including obesity, physical inactivity, and joint injury. OA-related joint pain causes functional limitations, poor sleep, fatigue, depressed mood and loss of independence. Compared to age and sex-matched peers, OA patients incur higher out of pocket health-related expenditures and substantial costs due to lost productivity. Most people with OA (59-87%) have at least one othe...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Authors: Jeong MJ, Kwon H, Kim MJ, Han Y, Kwon TW, Cho YP Abstract Purpose: We aimed to compare clinical outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) between Korean patients with and without severe contralateral extracranial carotid stenosis or occlusion (SCSO). Methods: Between January 2004 and December 2014, a total of 661 patients who underwent 731 CEAs were stratified by SCSO (non-SCSO and SCSO groups) and analyzed retrospectively. The study outcomes included the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), defined as stroke or myocardial infarction, and all-cause mortality during the perioperat...
Source: Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research - Category: Surgery Tags: Ann Surg Treat Res Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 October 2019Source: Brain, Behavior, and ImmunityAuthor(s): Jing Wang, Simin Lai, Guodong Li, Ting Zhou, Biao Wang, Fang Cao, Teng Chen, Xia Zhang, Yanjiong ChenAbstractWe previously demonstrated that the dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) inhibitor, NGB2904, increases susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms, elevates pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, and alters brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in mesolimbic dopaminergic regions, including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and ventral tegmental area (VTA) in mice. The mechanisms by which D3R in...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
A new study suggests an increased risk for suicide associated with angiotensin receptor blockers compared with ACE inhibitors among older adults, but leading cardiovascular experts are sceptical.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news
Young adults with PTSD may be at increased risk for TIA or a major stroke by middle age, based on new research published in the journal Stroke.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
Spravato is for use with an oral antidepressant in adults with major depressive disorder who have failed at least two different antidepressants.International Approvals
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Alert Source Type: news
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