Researchers successfully thaw cryopreserved tissue with no damage

A group of US scientists have successfully thawed cryopreserved tissue without damage to the sample, a huge step towards being able to use frozen or preserved tissues in transplantation, according to a new study. Researchers out of the University of Minnesota have developed a new heating method, using iron oxide nanoparticles which surround frozen tissues, to uniformly warm frozen animal heart valves without causing harm to the tissue. While cryopreservation of tissue and organs has been possible for some time, thawing the organs and tissue without cracks and fissures forming has been a more difficult task. “This paper takes the first practical step towards making tissue banking a reality,” Science Translational Medicine editor Caitlin Czajka said. Results from the study were published in Science Translational Medicine this month. More than 60% of donated hearts and lungs are thrown out each year due to their short lifespan, only viable for up to 4 hours before they begin to deteriorate. Previous studies have successfully thawed very small amount of tissue – about 1 milliliter – but in the most recent study, researchers were able to reheat arteries and heart valves in 50 milliliter vials. None of the thawed tissues showed any signs of damage, and the iron nanoparticles used to warm the tissue were able to be washed away, according to the study. “What we found is we could bring these tissues back at very rapid rates and we were able to mainta...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Tags: Clinical Trials Regenerative Medicine Transplants Source Type: news

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In conclusion, results from this study do not support a role for platelet activation in early phases of clinical I/R injury. PMID: 29636871 [PubMed]
Source: American Journal of Translational Research - Category: Research Tags: Am J Transl Res Source Type: research
Making human tissue in a lab has always been more sci-fi than sci-fact, but powerful genetic technologies may change that soon. For the most part, the only way to replace diseased or failing hearts, lungs, kidneys and livers is with donor organs. Even then, many people struggle to find a good biological match with a donor, and 8,000 die each year in the U.S. while waiting for an organ. In one promising solution to the shortage, researchers have been putting a new DNA editing tool called CRISPR through rigorous tests in organ regeneration. Last August, a group of scientists led by George Church, professor of genetics at Har...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity organ transplants Source Type: news
Abstract Suttonella indologenes is a Gram-negative, aerobic coccobacillus of Cardiobacteriaceae family and its natural habitat is the mucous membranes of the upper respiratory system. The literature includes limited number of case reports concerning fatal endocarditis due to infection in the prosthetic heart valves caused by the aforementioned microorganism. However, there is no information on extracardiac involvement due to this microorganism. Here, we present a peritonitis case caused by Suttonella indologenes in a patient receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. PMID: 29456228 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl Source Type: research
ANISH KOKA MD In an age where big data is king and doctors are urged to treat populations, the journey of one man still has much to tell us. This is a tale of a man named Joe. Joseph Carrigan was a bear of a man – though his wife would say he was more teddy than bear.  He loved guitar playing,  and camp horror movies.  Those who knew him well said he had a kind heart, a quick wit and loved cats. I knew none of these things when I met Joe in the Emergency Department on a Sunday afternoon.  I had been called because of an abnormal electrocardiogram – the ER team was worried he could be having ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
ANISH KOKA MD In an age where big data is king and doctors are urged to treat populations, the journey of one man still has much to tell us. This is a tale of a man named Joe. Joseph Carrigan was a bear of a man – though his wife would say he was more teddy than bear.  He loved guitar playing,  and camp horror movies.  Those who knew him well said he had a kind heart, a quick wit and loved cats. I knew none of these things when I met Joe in the Emergency Department on a Sunday afternoon.  I had been called because of an abnormal electrocardiogram – the ER team was worried he could be having ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cardiac surgery High-risk Quality Reporting Source Type: blogs
Conclusion This promising research shows that it can be possible to use gene editing techniques to eliminate retroviruses from pigs, removing one of the potential barriers to using genetically modified pigs as organ donors for humans. There are a few points to note. As the researchers say, though they have shown that pig retroviruses can be passed onto human cells in the laboratory, we don't know what the effects would be in real life. We don't know whether pig retroviruses would be transferred to humans and whether they could cause cancers or immunodeficiency illnesses, for example. The research is at an early stage. The ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news
In this study, researchers analysed data of millions of British patients between 1995 and 2015 to see if this claim held true. They tracked people who were obese at the start of the study, defined as people with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, who had no evidence of heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes at this point. They found these people who were obese but "metabolically healthy" were at higher risk of developing heart disease, strokes and heart failure than people of normal weight. No such thing as 'fat but fit', major study finds Several studies in the pas...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
3D printing has demonstrated huge potential for the future of medicine in the previous years, and its development is unstoppable. Just look at the impressive list of 3D printed healthcare materials and medical equipment below! How does 3D printing work? 3D printing is part of the innovative process called additive manufacturing, which means the production of three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. The printer uses a kind of layering process, by which one layer is added after the other until you have a fully formed object. It allows designers and engineers to create complex parts for cars, machines or air...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: 3D Printing in Medicine Future of Medicine 3d printed biomaterial bioprinting GC1 Health Healthcare Innovation medical technology tissue engineering Video Source Type: blogs
3D printing has demonstrated huge potential for the future of medicine in the previous years, and its development is unstoppable. Just look at the impressive list of 3D printed healthcare materials and medical equipment below! How does 3D printing work? 3D printing is part of the innovative process called additive manufacturing, which means the production of three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. The printer uses a kind of layering process, by which one layer is added after the other until you have a fully formed object. It allows designers and engineers to create complex parts for cars, machines or air...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: 3D Printing in Medicine Future of Medicine 3d printed biomaterial bioprinting GC1 Health Healthcare Innovation medical technology tissue engineering Video Source Type: blogs
This study scales up to 50 milliliters, which means there is a strong possibility they could scale up to even larger systems, like organs. Currently, more than 60 percent of the hearts and lungs donated for transplantation must be discarded each year because these tissues cannot be kept on ice for longer than four hours. Long-term preservation methods, like vitrification, that cool biological samples to an ice-free glassy state using very low temperatures between -160 and -196 degrees Celsius have been around for decades. However, the biggest problem has been with the rewarming. Tissues often suffer major damage during the...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
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