HRT for Menopause?

Thisarticle I saw on Yahoo News is an example of why patients ought not to go scouring the Internet for all their medical information.  The title of the article "Doctors Clear Up Confusion Over Hormone Therapy" is rather misleading.  Hormone replacement therapy (i.e. supplement estrogen and progesterone pills) has long been known to be the best intervention for refractory menopausal symptoms.  Unfortunately, a Women's Health Initiative study from a decade ago demonstrated that subsets of post-menopausal of women who took hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) medication increased their risk of developing breast cancer by 25%.  Afterwards, enthusiasm for HRT sort of tapered off.  As you could imagine.  This new statement avers that:...while the therapy comes with risks, its benefits generally outweigh the harm for women under age 60, or those who've been in menopause for fewer than 10 years. The increased risk ofbreast cancer also appears to disappear a few years after treatment is stopped......doctors recommend low doses of HRT for women whosemenopausal symptoms are limited to vaginal dryness and pain during intercourse. HRT is not recommended for women who've had breast cancer So if you're under 60, have had symptoms less than 10 years, never had breast cancer, and your symptoms are limited to vaginal dryness and dyspareunia, then HRT is for you.  I'm a little wary myself.  Curiously absent from the ...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: blogs

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The women’s health technology or so-called femtech market has been on the rise for the last couple of years, but it has mainly revolved around fertility and pregnancy. We believe that female health topics reach far beyond such traditional issues and players should concentrate more on menopause, endometriosis, or mental health, just to name a few areas. Thus, we tried to collect companies which are on top of their game in the conventional fertility and/or pregnancy area, but also start-ups and ventures who are looking way beyond that. Here’s our guide to 10 outstanding companies in women’s health. The w...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Business Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Telemedicine & Smartphones companies company digital digital health digital health technologies femtech health technology Innovation market women women's health Source Type: blogs
In this study, we found that the activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and mineralized nodules in MC3T3-E1 cells were both significantly increased after treatment with AG (5, 10, and 20 μM). Meanwhile, the mRNA and protein levels of osteoblastic marker genes in MC3T3-E1 cells after AG treatment were markedly increased compared with a control group. In addition, the levels of BMP-2, p-Smad1/5/9, and Runx2 were significantly elevated in AG-treated MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, we found that the protein levels of Erk1/2, p-Erk1/2, p38, p-p38, and p-JNK were also significantly increased in AG-treated MC3T3-E1 cells compared ...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
2019 NINR Director's Lecture Dr. Eun-Ok Im will present " Midlife Women ’ s Health: Using Technology to Enhance Research and Eliminate Disparities " . In her presentation, Dr. Im will discuss her program of research, which uses computer and mobile technologies to eliminate gender and ethnic disparities. Eun-Ok Im, PhD, MPH, RN, CNS, FAAN is the Associate Dean for Research Development and Regulatory Affairs and Mary T. Champagne Professor at Duke University, School of Nursing. She has gained national and international recognition as a methodologist, researcher, and theorist in international, cross-cultural w...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Lilly Rocha was 37 years old in 2008 when she began having strange symptoms. When people asked her questions, she knew the answers but couldn’t articulate them. A tingling sensation on her left breast became painful. She thought she might have breast cancer, but her doctor assured her she was just experiencing stress from her demanding job. Her symptoms continued to get worse, and doctors continued to dismiss her. Three months later, at work, she became seriously ill. Luckily, her boss recognized the symptoms—chest and jaw pain and numbness in her left hand—and drove her to the nearest emergency room, whe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized heart health Source Type: news
Abstract With declining mortality rates, the number of breast cancer survivors is increasing. Ongoing care after breast cancer treatment is often provided by primary care physicians. This care includes surveillance for cancer recurrence with a history and physical examination every three to six months for the first three years after treatment, every six to 12 months for two more years, and annually thereafter. Mammography is performed annually. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast is not indicated unless patients are at high risk of recurrence, such as having a hereditary cancer syndrome. Many breast cancer su...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: These findings suggest the importance of (a) pain catastrophizing, (b) perceived breast cancer risk and, (c) worry that breast pain may indicate cancer, as potential targets for interventions aimed at reducing the negative psychological impact of PBP in post-surgery breast cancer survivors, as well as in unaffected women with PBP due to unknown reasons. PMID: 30747014 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Acta Oncologica - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Acta Oncol Source Type: research
This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and severity of menopausal symptoms and their associated risk factors among postmenopausal breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant endocrine therapy. METHODS: Postmenopausal breast cancer patients on endocrine therapy were recruited at three hospitals in Malaysia. Presence and severity of menopausal symptoms were determined using the Menopause Rating Scale. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected from medical records. RESULTS: A total of 192 patients participated in this study. Commonly reported symptoms were musculoskeletal pain (59.9%), physical a...
Source: Climacteric - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Climacteric Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 December 2018Source: Journal of Geriatric OncologyAuthor(s): Andrea Sitlinger, Rebecca A. Shelby, Alyssa N. Van Denburg, Heidi White, Sarah N. Edmond, Paul K. Marcom, Hayden B. Bosworth, Francis J. Keefe, Gretchen G. KimmickAbstractObjectiveTo explore the impact of symptoms on physical function in women on adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer.MethodsEligible women were postmenopausal, had hormone receptor positive, stage I-IIIA breast cancer, completed surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and on adjuvant endocrine therapy. At a routine follow-up visit, women (N = 107) complete...
Source: Journal of Geriatric Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
This article, however, is more of a commentary on high level strategy and the effects of regulation, coupled with a desire to forge ahead rather than hold back in the matter of treating aging, thus I concur with much more of what is said than is usually the case. For decades, one of the most debated questions in gerontology was whether aging is a disease or the norm. At present, excellent reasoning suggests aging should be defined as a disease - indeed, aging has been referred to as "normal disease." Aging is the sum of all age-related diseases and this sum is the best biomarker of aging. Aging and its d...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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