ADHD Medications and Risk of Serious Cardiovascular Events in Young and Middle-aged Adults

Interview with Laurel A. Habel, PhD, author of ADHD Medications and Risk of Serious Cardiovascular Events in Young and Middle-aged Adults
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Source Type: podcasts

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Conditions:   ADHD;   Executive Dysfunction Intervention:   Device: ADHD-VR diagnosis tool Sponsors:   Tjhin Wiguna;   Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Indonesia;   Dr Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital;   Binus University International Enrolling by invitation
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Narcolepsy in childhood-adolescence is characterized by a high occurrence of psychiatric comorbidities. The most frequent psychiatric disorders reported in these patients are attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, depression, anxiety disorder, and schizophrenia. However, narcolepsy can be associated also with introversion, sorrowfulness, feelings of inferiority, impaired affectivity modulation, emotional lability, irritability, aggressiveness, and poor attention, that have been pooled by some authors under a definition of “narcoleptic personality.” Some aspects of this “narcoleptic personality,” ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Condition:   Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Intervention:   Other: Neuropsychological and attachment/parenting assessment Sponsors:   Queen Fabiola Children's University Hospital;   The Belgian Kids' Fund Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conditions:   Posttraumatic Stress Disorder;   Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Interventions:   Behavioral: RFPP;   Behavioral: TFCBT Sponsors:   University of California, Los Angeles;   Kern Medical;   American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry. Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
The hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis acts to release cortisol into the blood stream, as cortisol calls the body into action to combat stress. When high amounts of cortisol interact with the hypothalamus, the HPA axis will slow down its activity. The amygdala detects stress, while the prefrontal cortex regulates our reactions to stress. Source: Bezdek K and Telzer E (2017) Have No Fear, the Brain is Here! How Your Brain Responds to Stress. Front. Young Minds. 5:71. doi: 10.3389/frym.2017.00071 _______ [Editor’s note: Continued from yesterday’s Exploring the human brain and how it responds to...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness #WorldHealthDay brain burnout cognition Cortisol GAS General Adaptation Syndrome homeostasis memory neurobiology neurological exhaustion Stress Source Type: blogs
Conditions:   Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder;   Posttraumatic Stress Disorder;   Reminder Focused Positive Psychiatry;   Neuroinflammation Interventions:   Behavioral: RFPP;   Behavioral: TFCBT Sponsors:   University of California, Los Angeles;   Kern Medical;   American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry. Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Intervention:   Other: Neuropsychological and attachment/parenting assessment Sponsors:   Queen Fabiola Children's University Hospital;   The Belgian Kids' Fund Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Translational Psychiatry, Published online: 07 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41398-020-0781-2Machine learning classification of ADHD and HC by multimodal serotonergic data
Source: Translational Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
__ Worry is like a rocking chair. It gives you something to do, but it gets you nowhere. — Erma Bombeck The brain is the control center for all of our thoughts, actions, attitudes, and emotions. It’s the pilothouse on the riverboat of our lives. It’s Mission Control for all of our flights into space or time. It’s the air traffic controller that helps us navigate and reroute our paths based on incoming and outgoing information and how we’re feeling about it at the time. It’s the John Williams of our personal symphony. It’s the Mother Ship to our Starfleet; it’s … (Uh, s...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness human-brain neurological neuropsychologist Stress Stress Response Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 6 April 2020Source: Neuroscience ResearchAuthor(s): Elena I. Rodríguez-Martínez, Antonio Arjona Valladares, Jaime Gómez-González, José A. Diaz-Sanchez, Carlos M. Gómez
Source: Neuroscience Research - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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