Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

These nanostraws can sample cells without damaging them

[Image by Royroydeb – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0]Stanford University researchers say they’ve developed nanostraws capable of sampling cell contents—all without disrupting natural processes. The innovation has the potential to provide non-destructive cell monitoring versus lysing, the cell sampling method presently used. Lysing ruptures the cell, while the sampling method developed at Stanford relies on tiny tubes that are 600 times smaller than a strand of hair. The nanostraws penetrate the cell’s outer membrane without damage, sampling proteins and genetic material inside the cell. The method is like a “blood draw for the cell,” says Nicholas Melosh, an associate professor of materials science and engineering and senior author of the paper describing the research. Melosh and his colleagues recently published the paper in the  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Melosh envisions the nanostraw sampling technique enabling long-term, non-destructive monitoring of cells, providing a much better understanding of cell development. Thanks to the nanostraws, researchers could hopefully gain a much better understanding of stem cell development or the effectiveness of cancer therapies. Get the full story on our sister site, Medical Design &Outsourcing. The post These nanostraws can sample cells without damaging them appeared first on MassDevice.
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Tags: Research & Development Stem Cells lysing MedTech nanostraws Stanford Source Type: news

Related Links:

AbstractPurpose of ReviewWith improvements in cancer treatment outcomes and an increase in cancer survivorship, understanding the importance of fertility preservation options prior to undergoing cancer treatment is essential. Therefore, we review herein the effect of cancer and its treatment on male fertility, the rationale for sperm cryopreservation, options for sperm retrieval, ART outcomes, and experimental options.Recent FindingsRecent data update fertility outcomes with newer cancer therapies and provide longitudinal insight into survivor paternity with and without fertility preservation. Likewise, updated ART outcome...
Source: Current Urology Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Abstract Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cell (CSC) theory represents an important mechanism underlying the observed failure of existing therapeutic modalities to fully eradicate cancers. In addition to their more established role in maintaining minimal residual disease after treatment and forming the new bulk of the tumor, CSCs might also critically contribute to tumor recurrence and metastasis. For this reason, specific elimination of CSCs may thus represent one of the most important treatment strategies. Emerging evidence has shown that CSCs have a different metabolic phenotype to that of differen...
Source: BMB Reports - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: BMB Rep Source Type: research
Authors: Tickner JA, Richard DJ, O'Byrne KJ Abstract The role of extracellular vesicles (EV) in carcinogenesis has become the focus of much research. These microscopic messengers have been found to regulate immune system function, particularly in tumorigenesis, as well as conditioning future metastatic sites for the attachment and growth of tumor tissue. Through an interaction with a range of host tissues, EVs are able to generate a pro-tumor environment that is essential for tumorigenesis. These small nanovesicles are an ideal candidate for a non-invasive indicator of pathogenesis and/or disease progression as the...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Authors: Liu X, Hu J, Li Y, Cao W, Wang Y, Ma Z, Li F Abstract Development of an improved breast cancer therapy has been an elusive goal of cancer gene therapy for a long period of time. Human mesenchymal stem cells derived from umbilical cord (hUMSCs) genetically modified with the interleukin (IL)-18 gene (hUMSCs/IL-18) were previously demonstrated to be able to suppress the proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, the effect of hUMSCs/IL-18 on breast cancer in a mouse model was investigated. A total of 128 mice were divided into 2 studies (the early-effect study...
Source: Oncology Letters - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncol Lett Source Type: research
Abstract PRDM14 belongs to PR domain-containing (PRDM) family. Although a precise understanding is focused on the function of PRDM14 maintains stemness and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells via epigenetic mechanisms, there are growing experimental evidences have been linked PRDM14 to human cancers. In adults, PRDM14 is low expression in human tissues. Aberrant PRDM14 expression is connected with various malignant histological types and solid cancers, where PRDM14 can act as a driver of oncogenic processes. Overexpression of RPDM14 enhanced cancer cells growth and reduced cancer cells sensitive to chemotherapeut...
Source: Current Cancer Drug Targets - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Curr Cancer Drug Targets Source Type: research
Abstract Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) describes an asymptomatic expansion of blood cells descended from a single hematopoietic stem cell. Recent studies have shown that CH increases in frequency with aging, and is often driven by somatic mutations in genes that are recurrently mutated in hematologic malignancies. When CH is associated with a mutation in a leukemia-associated gene at a variant allele frequency of 0.02 or greater, it is termed "clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential" (CHIP).  CHIP has a 0.5-1% risk per year of progression to hematological neoplasia, and increases both all-cause ...
Source: Clinical Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Cancer Res Source Type: research
Publication date: May–June 2018 Source:Reports of Practical Oncology & Radiotherapy, Volume 23, Issue 3 Author(s): Patrycja CzerwiƄska, Sylwia Mazurek, Maciej Wiznerowicz As soon as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) reprogramming of somatic cells were developed, the discovery attracted the attention of scientists, offering new perspectives for personalized medicine and providing a powerful platform for drug testing. The technology was almost immediately applied to cancer studies. As presented in this review, direct reprogramming of cancer cells with enforced expression of pluripotency factors have several ...
Source: Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Annals of the American Thoracic Society,Volume 15, Issue Supplement_2, Page S127-S128, April 2018.
Source: Annals of the American Thoracic Society - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
arner A growing body of evidence suggests that a subset of cells within tumors are resistant to conventional treatment modalities and may be responsible for disease recurrence. These cells are called cancer stem cells (CSC), which share properties with normal stem cells including self-renewal, pluripotency, drug resistance, and the ability to maintain quiescence. While most conventional therapies can efficiently destroy rapidly dividing cancer cells comprising the bulk of a tumor, they often fail to kill the less abundant and quiescent CSCs. Furthermore, killing of only differentiated cells in the tumor may actually al...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Scientists at the Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center (VIC) at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel, two-agent immunotherapy combination that worked surprisingly well in animal models with malignant mesothelioma. The discovery has sparked new optimism for immunotherapy, which has struggled to provide consistently positive results with aggressive cancers such as mesothelioma. “This is the beginning of a new story of hope, a new combination of immunotherapy,” Dr. Mark Poznansky, director of the VIC and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, told Asbestos.com. “It worked quite well in a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
More News: Academies | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cancer Therapy | Genetics | Materials Science | Nanotechnology | Science | Stem Cell Therapy | Stem Cells