IV contrast for CT is not associated with increased risk of acute kidney injury

Intravenous contrast media (typically iohexol or iodixanol) used in computed tomography (CT) does not appear to be associated with chronic kidney disease, dialysis, kidney transplant or acute kidney injury, despite long-held fears to the contrary. The results of the largest controlled study of acute kidney injury following contrast media administration in the emergency department were just published.
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Abstract Vascular calcification (VC) is a well-known complication in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Keeping in mind, the end goal to assess the genuine effect of mineral bone disease in the pathogenesis of blood vessel calcification during the pre-dialysis course of CKD, we assessed the prevalence and extent of abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) in nondiabetic CKD patients recently starting hemodialysis (HD). Eighty-one patients with end-stage renal disease beginning HD over a one-month period were selected. They underwent a detailed clinical examination and laboratory evaluation, including serum ca...
Source: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl Source Type: research
ConclusionPAC was better than AAC in predicting mortality in CKD, HD and KT patients.
Source: International Urology and Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Conclusion In the largest well-controlled study of acute kidney injury following contrast administration in the ED to date, intravenous contrast was not associated with an increased frequency of acute kidney injury.
Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
Background The natural course of native kidneys after renal transplantation (RT) or dialysis in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) remains poorly understood. Methods We measured the total volumes of native kidneys and liver in 78 and 68 ADPKD patients, respectively, who had pre-transplant (within 2 years) and at least one post-transplant computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); in 40 patients with at least two post-transplant but no pre-transplant CT/MRIs; in 9 patients on chronic hemodialysis with at least one CT/MRI before and after beginning dialysis; and in 5 patients ...
Source: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease Source Type: research
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) frequently require radiographic examinations. We investigated the impact of repeated contrast administrations on short‐ and long‐term kidney function and mortality in kidney transplantation candidates. In a prospective study, 81 predialysis transplantation candidates underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA) as part of a pretransplant cardiovascular evaluation. Postcontrast plasma creatinine (P‐creatinine) changes were compared with a precontrast control period. We identified postcontrast acute kidney injury (AKI) in 10 patients ...
Source: American Journal of Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Abstract Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 3 % of adult solid tumors, with the highest incidence between 50 and 70 years of age. Nephron-sparing surgery was initially reserved to patients with small renal masses detected in anatomically or functionally solitary kidney or in the presence of multiple bilateral tumors or hereditary forms of RCC, which posed a high risk of developing a tumor in the contralateral kidney. Nowadays, partial nephrectomy (PN) has grown up to an established approach for the treatment of small renal masses. In patients with T1a-staged RCCs, PN has proven to be associated ...
Source: International Urology and Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Background Osteoprotegerin (OPG), sclerostin and DKK1 constitute opposite bone turnover inhibitors, OPG inhibiting osteoclastogenesis while sclerostin and DKK1 exerting their inhibitory effects on osteoblastogenesis. Both proteins have been recognized as strong risk factors of vascular calcifications in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between these inhibitors and coronary artery calcifications (CAC) in this population. Methods A total of 241 ND-CKD patients [143 males; 69.0 (25.0–95.0) years; median estimated glomerular filtration rate...
Source: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease Source Type: research
Source: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: DIALYSIS. CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS - 1 Source Type: research
Source: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE. BONE DISEASE Source Type: research
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