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Music Training May Facilitate Memory Function in Alzheimer ’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has long been considered a detrimental form of dementia. With over 35 million individuals globally living with dementia and this number predicted to triple in the next thirty years (World Health Organization, 2012); it is now vital that effective pharmacological treatments help modify the disease and improve individual’s quality of life — as current pharmacological treatments have only been effective in relation to relieving the severity of symptoms. As a result researchers have looked to investigate whether other non-pharmacological treatments can supplement pharmacological treatments to aid AD sufferers in their battle with the disease. There is growing amounts of evidence demonstrating that music interventions are effective in treating dementia such as relieving symptoms and eliciting positive physiological effects — whether it be listening, music therapy or musical activities. Impaired memory is the most common symptom of AD individuals and most research has focused on the effect visual and verbal stimuli has on AD. However researchers such as Cuddy have investigated the possibility of memory for music which may be accessed differently than visual and verbal stimuli. For example there are cases of musicians with AD continuing to play their instrument and learning new pieces of music despite their impaired memory due to their disease (Cowles et al, 2003). This is backed up by evidence that suggests lyrics in a song aid verb...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Caregivers Disabilities Memory and Perception Alzheimer's disease Cognition Dementia Music Therapy Source Type: news

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Abstract Neurodegenerative diseases are hereditary or sporadic conditions that result in the progressive loss of the structure and function of neurons as well as neuronal death. Although a range of diseases lie under this umbrella term, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the most common neurodegenerative diseases that affect a large population around the globe. Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid-β plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles in brain regions and manifests as a type of dementia in aged individuals that results ...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
In conclusion, a debate exists on whether aging is a disease in itself. Some authors suggest that physiological aging (or senescence) is not really distinguishable from pathology, while others argue that aging is different from age-related diseases and other pathologies. It is interesting to stress that the answer to this question has important theoretical and practical consequences, taking into account that various strategies capable of setting back the aging clock are emerging. The most relevant consequence is that, if we agree that aging is equal to disease, all human beings have to be considered as patients to be treat...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
A study of nearly 2.8 million adults spanning 36 years suggests that people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are more likely to develop dementia than those with no history of TBI. Thefindings, which were published this week inLancet Psychiatry, demonstrate the heightened risk of dementia years following a TBI.TBI affects 47 million people globally and is a major cause of mortality and disability, yet large-scale studies with long follow-up have been sparse, wrote lead author Jesse Fann, M.D., M.P.H., a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and colleagues. The r...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Danish Civil Registration System dementia fracture Jesse Fann Lancet Psychiatry TBI traumatic brain injury Source Type: research
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and a leading cause of disability in late life (Prince  et al., 2013). Despite cognitive symptoms being the hallmark of the disease, depression is common affecting around half of patients at some point during the illness (Di Iulio et al., 2010). Systematic review data (Chi et al., 2015) indicate that estimates of prevalence of major depression in Alzheimer's disease vary by diagnostic approaches, with estimates of 12.7% using DSM-IV criteria (American Psychiatric Association, 1994), versus rates of over 40% in studies emplo...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
This studycounters that notion, and the findings may suggest that many senior citizens remain more cognitively and emotionally intact than commonly believed. "We found that older people have similar ability to make thousands of hippocampal new neurons from progenitor cells as younger people do. We also found equivalent volumes of the hippocampus (a brain structure used for emotion and cognition) across ages. Nevertheless, older individuals had less vascularization and maybe less ability of new neurons to make connections. It is possible that ongoing hippocampal neurogenesis sustains human-specific cognitive fun...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: It is still premature to conclude that DBS can be used in the treatment of AD, and the field will wait for the results of ongoing and future clinical trials. PMID: 29576909 [PubMed]
Source: Surgical Neurology International - Category: Neurosurgery Tags: Surg Neurol Int Source Type: research
In conclusion, senescence of vascular cells promotes the development of age-related disorders, including heart failure, diabetes, and atherosclerotic diseases, while suppression of vascular cell senescence ameliorates phenotypic features of aging in various models. Recent findings have indicated that specific depletion of senescent cells reverses age-related changes. Although the biological networks contributing to maintenance of homeostasis are extremely complex, it seems reasonable to explore senolytic agents that can act on specific cellular components or tissues. Several clinical trials of senolytic agents are currentl...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
According to the Alzheimer’s Association, approximately 5.5 million Americans are now living with the disease, and it is estimated that 16 million people will be living with Alzheimer’s by the year 2050. While deaths from heart disease have decreased by 14% since 2000, deaths from Alzheimer’s disease have increased by 89%. It is also interesting to note that 35% of caregivers (family and friends) of Alzheimer’s or other dementia patients report that their own health has declined compared to 19% of caregivers of older people with no dementia. Clearly, we have a crisis on our hands — not just fo...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Disabilities Memory and Perception Neuroscience Alzheimer's disease Dementia Memory Loss Source Type: news
In this study, we did not observe significant age-dependent upregulation of the prominent SASP cytokine Il6 in any tissue, although an upward trend was observed that was consistent in magnitude with previous observations in the heart and kidney. This modest age-related upward trend could be explained by a previous report which demonstrated that senescent cell-secreted IL-6 acts in an autocrine manner, reinforcing the senescent state, rather than inducing senescence or promoting dysfunction in neighboring cells. The decreased expression of Il6 with age we observed in the hypothalamus could be indicative of a lack or ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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