Government document confirms vaccine link to microcephaly

(NaturalNews) The adverse event-deniers who insist that vaccines are 100 percent safe and never cause any problems in children clearly missed a little-known 1991 study published by the United States Government. This paper reveals a clear link between the popular Tdap vaccine for tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough), and microcephaly, a neurological birth defect...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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[The Conversation Africa] Over the years vaccines have prevented countless cases of disease and saved millions of lives. Infectious diseases like polio, measles, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough), rubella (German measles), smallpox, mumps, tetanus and rotavirus used to be common around the world. Today vaccines can prevent them.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, got her granddaughter immunized using a mix of private and public clinics. Credit: Veronique Magnin – Habari Kibra VolunteerBy Joyce NgangaNAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 25 2018 (IPS)Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, is certain that her grand-daughter needs to get all her vaccines for her to grow up healthy and strong. She uses a mix of private and public clinics in Kibera, one of the largest informal settlement in Nairobi, to get the 15-month-old the shots she needs. Mary Awour, mother to two-year-old Vilance Amondi, also believes immunization is important to protect her ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
22 April 2018, Cairo – This year’s World Immunization Week campaign, celebrated from 24 to 30 April, aims to highlight that protecting entire communities with vaccines protects everyone and so the theme of this year’s campaign is “Protected Together, #VaccinesWork”.  Immunization is one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions. Studies show that every US$ 1 spent on childhood immunization returns US$ 44 in economic and social benefits.  Immunization protects everyone – from infants to senior citizens – against disabling illnesses, disability a...
Source: WHO EMRO News - Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news
Despite recommendations from the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice and ACOG, tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination rates during pregnancy remain very low at about 10%. Vaccinating pregnant women confers passive immunity to infants against pertussis, who experience significantly higher mortality from whooping cough. We sought to highlight the importance of this recommendation by assessing the cost-effectiveness of the Tdap vaccine in pregnant women for preventing pertussis infection in infants.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session V Source Type: research
Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) 2016 National Immunization Survey-Teen was recently released and, once again, adolescent immunization rates for some vaccines recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices are disappointingly low [1]. The CDC recommends adolescents receive four immunizations —two of which are administered as multidose series—to help protect against meningococcal meningitis; human papillomavirus; tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough); and influenza.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Timely vaccination can prevent three-quarters of cases in newborns Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Infections and Pregnancy, Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis Vaccines, Whooping Cough
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion Because the mainstream media has financial interest in promoting vaccines, informed parents must seek information elsewhere about back to school vaccine mandates and exemptions. Parents, as you prepare to send your child back to school, do your homework and determine which exemptions are available in your area. A list of vaccine exemptions for all fifty states is published online by the National Vaccine Information Center. Sharing this article with other parents will also help them make informed decisions about vaccines. References: http://www.nvic.org/vaccine-laws/state-vaccine-requirements.aspx http://www.oma...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Top Stories truth about vaccines Vaccine Exemptions Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Differences traced by MLVA in relation to the MLST and PFGE profiling confirmed that the B. pertussis strain types currently observed elsewhere in Europe, even if appearing in Poland, were not able to successfully disseminate within a human population in Poland that has been vaccinated with a whole-cell pertussis vaccine not used in other countries. PMID: 28598302 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
Just three years ago, Michigan had the fourth-highest rate of unvaccinated kindergartners in the nation. But when a charter school in northwestern Traverse City reported nearly two dozen cases of whooping cough and several cases of measles that November, state officials were jolted to action. Without much fanfare — or time for opponents to respond — they abandoned the state’s relatively loose rules for getting an exemption and issued a regulation requiring families to consult personally with local public health departments before obtaining an immunization waiver. The new rule sidestepped potential ideolog...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(Reuters Health) - Too many U.S. adults are not getting vaccinated, putting themselves and others at risk, immunization experts say. According to the latest available data, about 44 percent of adults over age 19 had a flu shot; 20 percent had a TDAP vaccine, which protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis; and 20 percent of 19-to-64-year-olds at risk of pneumonia had that vaccine (compared to 60 percent of those over 65). Just 27 percent of those over age 60 were vaccinated against herpes zoster, which cuts the risk of shingles in half, according to new guidelines from the Advisory Committee on Immunization P...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
More News: Children | Cough | Diphtheria | Government | Neurology | Study | Tetanus | Tetanus Diptheria Pertussis Vaccine Tdap,Dtap,Dpt | Tetanus Vaccine | Vaccines | Whooping Cough | Whooping Cough (Pertussis) Vaccine