Lung Transplant Receipients: Increased Skin Cancer Risk Lung Transplant Receipients: Increased Skin Cancer Risk

The first U.S. population-based study of skin cancer in organ transplant recipients found the highest risk in patients who are older, male, white and had pre-transplant skin cancer or received a heart or lung transplant, researchers report.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

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Lung transplant recipients are at very high risk of skin cancer. Omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) are anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating and potentially could reduce this risk. We assessed the feasibility of omega-3 FA supplementation to reduce skin cancer among these patients.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Clinical Science Source Type: research
The objectives of the present study are to assess the practice of lung transplant centers regarding the selection of transplant candidates with skin cancer, and a single center outcome of lung transplantation of patients with skin cancer after implementation of ITSCC guideline.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In January, 2018, Academic Press published my bookPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease. This book has an excellent " look inside " at itsGoogle book site, which includes the Table of Contents. In addition, I thought it might be helpful to see the topics listed in the Book's index. Note that page numbers followed by f indicate figures, t indicate tables, and ge indicate glossary terms.AAbandonware, 270, 310geAb initio, 34, 48ge, 108geABL (abelson leukemia) gene, 28, 58ge, 95 –97Absidia corymbifera, 218Acanthameoba, 213Acanthosis nigricans, 144geAchondroplasia, 74, 143ge, 354geAcne, 54ge, 1...
Source: Specified Life - Category: Information Technology Tags: index jules berman jules j berman precision medicine Source Type: blogs
Increased risk of malignancy is a major complication of lung transplantation. Keratinocyte cancers (KC), namely cutaneous squamous cell cancers (SCCs) and basal cell cancers (BCCs), are a particular risk, and cause high morbidity and some mortality among lung transplant recipients (LTRs).1 Actinic keratoses (AKs) are potentially premalignant skin lesions strongly associated with SCC although the AK burden in LTR has not been specifically measured. The heightened risks of skin cancer and AKs are due to two main factors, high-dose immunosuppression and sun exposure, but their relative contributions are unknown.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Summary The risk of melanoma in organ transplant recipients (OTR) is increased compared with the general population. This retrospective study registered all cases of post‐transplant melanoma in kidney, heart, lung, and liver transplant recipients followed in our specialized post‐transplant Dermatology Clinic since 1991. The yearly prevalence of melanoma and skin carcinoma between 2000 and 2015 was computed and compared in this population. Based on another cohort of kidney transplant recipients grafted since 2005, adjusted age‐ and sex‐standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was calculated using a renal transplantation r...
Source: Transplant International - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
This study aimed to estimate associations between combined measurements of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with mortality and incident coronary artery disease (CAD). This study followed 130,473 UK Biobank participants aged 60-69 years (baseline 2006-2010) for 8.3 years (n = 2974 deaths). Current smokers and individuals with recent or disease-associated (e.g., from dementia, heart failure, or cancer) weight loss were excluded, yielding a "healthier agers" group. Ignoring WHR, the risk of mortality for overweight subjects was similar to that for normal-weight subjects. However, among normal-weight subjects...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we focused on two pathways of cardiomyocytes or heart cells: the Hippo pathway, which is involved in stopping renewal of adult cardiomyocytes, and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC) pathway, essential for cardiomyocyte normal functions." Previous work had hinted that components of the DGC pathway may somehow interact with members of the Hippo pathway. The researchers genetically engineered mice to lack genes involved in one or both pathways, and then determined the ability of the heart to repair an injury. These studies showed for the first time that dystroglycan 1, a component of the DGC ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionOur data suggest that, contrasting with non‐melanoma skin cancer, the risk of post‐transplant melanoma has considerably increased over the last decade.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Transplant International - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Objectives: 1. Use UNOS/OPTN to establish a cohort of HFHS patients who received heart, lung, liver, pancreas or kidney organ transplants between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 2011 2. Explore racial differences in histologically-confirmed skin cancer for OTRs: calculate the incidence of skin cancer by race; calculate the cumulative incidence of skin cancer in the cohort using person-years at risk; compare, by race, the rates of skin cancer for OTRs in our cohort to that of the general population to determine if the difference in rates observed by race in the general population is similar to the difference in rates by race among OTRs.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
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