The Technological Future of Surgery

The future of surgery offers an amazing cooperation between humans and technology, which could elevate the level of precision and efficiency of surgeries so high we have never seen before. Will we have Matrix-like small surgical robots? Will they pull in and out organs from patients’ bodies? The scene is not impossible. It looks like we have come a long way from ancient Egypt, where doctors performed invasive surgeries as far back as 3,500 years ago. Only two years ago, Nasa teamed up with American medical company Virtual Incision to develop a robot that can be placed inside a patient’s body and then controlled remotely by a surgeon. That’s the reason why I strongly believe surgeons have to reconsider their stance towards technology and the future of their profession. Surgeons have to rethink their profession Surgeons are at the top of the medical food chain. At least that’s the impression the general audience gets from popular medical drama series and their own experiences. No surprise there. Surgeons bear huge responsibilities: they might cause irreparable damages and medical miracles with one incision on the patient’s body. No wonder that with the rise of digital technologies, the Operating Rooms and surgeons are inundated with new devices aiming at making the least cuts possible. We need to deal with these new surgical technologies in order to make everyone understood that they extend the capabilities of surgeons instead of replacing them. ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Medical Augmented Reality Medical Robotics Virtual Reality in Medicine 3d printing AI artificial intelligence diagnostics gc4 Surgery surgical robot technology Source Type: blogs

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Publication date: Available online 14 October 2019Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology &TherapeuticsAuthor(s): Huda Badri, Jaclyn A. SmithAbstractCough is mediated by vagal afferent fibres innervating the larynx and proximal airways. Pre-clinical studies suggest that vagal C fibres produce Substance P, one of the tachykinin family of neuropeptides, which has been shown to enhance cough via the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and studies in animal models have also shown that NK-1 antagonists are effective at blocking induced cough. In the past, tachykinin receptor antagonists have yielded disappointing results in treating asthma...
Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Objectives The goals of this study were to compare the efficacy of the new manganese-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent Mn-PyC3A to the commercial gadolinium-based agents Gd-DOTA and to Gd-EOB-DTPA to detect tumors in murine models of breast cancer and metastatic liver disease, respectively, and to quantify the fractional excretion and elimination of Mn-PyC3A in rats. Methods T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI with 0.1 mmol/kg Mn-PyC3A was compared with 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DOTA in a breast cancer mouse model (n = 8) and to 0.025 mmol/kg Gd-EOB-DTPA in a liver metastasis mouse model (n = 6). The fractional...
Source: Investigative Radiology - Category: Radiology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
This study aims at prospectively evaluating an adapted DWI sequence ex vivo and in vivo in oncologic patients undergoing abdominal MRI. Methods This institutional review board–approved, prospective study included phantom measurements, volunteer examinations, and oncologic patient examinations of the abdomen. Fifty-seven MRI examinations in 54 patients (mean age, 58 years; range, 21–90 years) were included into the analysis. The MRI examination were performed at a 1.5 T MRI scanner (MAGNETOM Aera; Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) and included both a standard EPI-DWI (s-DWI; b = 50, 900 s/mm2) and an ada...
Source: Investigative Radiology - Category: Radiology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
ConclusionOur clinical outcomes are comparable overall to the three main published articles on this topic. The risk of infection and benefits of preventative fixation were apparent in our cohort.Level of evidenceIV, retrospective study.
Source: Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
ConclusionPresented technique seems to be a safe and effective alternative to other POP treatment methods. It is associated with a negligible complications rate. Laparoscopic approach with it's superiority to laparotomy in some patients and a short learning curve, makes it even safer. Increasing the number of treated patients and continuing follow-up 3 and 5 years after the surgery is planned.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionMore surgical complications were seen in abdominal cases versus minimally invasive cases. Out of all the major and minor complications seen in gyn surgery the more common complication were GU complications. Currently in the process of analyzing complications based on surgeon experience and training with the hypothesis that surgeons who operate more and have gynecological training after residency will have fewer complications
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionThere was no difference in the risk of repeat surgery within 2 years whether endometriosis was excised or ablated. Excision using robot-assisted technique showed a non-significant trend toward a decrease in reoperation rate. In this clinical center, endometriosis ablation and excision are equally effective to prevent repeat surgery. The method should be selected based on surgeon experience.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionSub-cutaneous and/ or intra-peritoneal anesthesia were not effective in reducing post-operative pain.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionNeoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by laparoscopic and open radical hysterectomy seems to be a safe treatment option for locally advanced cervical cancer, in terms of similar survival outcomes and morbidity of treatment with CCRT. However, the present study is too limited to permit conclusions due to its small sample size and retrospective design despite statistical methods for adjusting confounding factors.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionOverall hyperplasia incidence is increasing. While BMI is elevated, there was no upward trend observed. Does the insidious decline in age demographic suggest that hyperplasia is occurring in younger women? Our review did not demonstrate a continuous increase in atypia, however there was a higher incidence in the 2013 group, who were also the most obese. Adherence to best practice surveillance in our hospitals was falling short.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
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