Enzyme Revealed as Promising Target to Treat Asthma and Cancer - 4/10/14

In experiments with mice, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have identified an enzyme involved in the regulation of immune system T cells that could be a useful target in treating asthma and boosting the effects of certain cancer therapies.
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - Category: Research Source Type: news

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Disclosed are A3 adenosine receptor antagonists and/or partial agonists of formula (I): wherein R1 to R5 are as described herein, as well as pharmaceutical compositions thereof and methods of use thereof. The antagonists or partial agonists find use in treating a number of diseases including cancer, glaucoma, inflammatory diseases, asthma, stroke, myocardial infarction, allergic reactions, rhinitis, poison ivy induced responses, urticaria, scleroderma, arthritis, brain arteriole diameter constriction, bronchoconstriction, and myocardial ischemia, as well as in preventing cardiac ischemia. Also disclosed are radiolabeled co...
Source: NIDDK Research Resources - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
(Natural News) Outdoor air pollution is detrimental to a person’s health – this much is certain. Various studies link it to major health conditions such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Now, researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs (VA) St. Louis Health Care...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study analyzed associations between a variety of human diseases and trace metals, PCBs, and PAHs in soil, groundwater, sediment, and fish. Contaminant spatial data at the county level from Virginia were used in ArcGIS to identify these associations among socially vulnerable populations. The neurologic and psychiatric disorders and cognitive markers were associated with numerous metals in groundwater/soil and/or aquatic system contaminants. Cancer death rates, fetal deaths, and infant deaths were also related to multiple environmental exposures from both categories of exposure. In contrast, many of the chronic diseases...
Source: Environmental Geochemistry and Health - Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research
(CNN) — Parents may want to take a second look at their children’s school supplies this season. The results of lab tests detailed in a report released Tuesday found traces of asbestos, lead and other dangerous chemicals in a number of popular school supplies. The US Public Interest Research Group Education Fund tested dozens of typical classroom materials for toxins. While most were nontoxic, some crayons, markers and binders received a failing grade. Here are some of the products that tested positive for toxic substances: Playskool crayons (36 count) This box set, purchased at Dollar Tree, has traces of asbes...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Asbestos Local TV Source Type: news
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) University of Colorado Cancer Center and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center study shows KRAS-driven lung cancers are also marked by high levels of 'gel-forming mucins,' as seen in some forms of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. The study, published Aug. 9 in the journal JCI Insight, also pinpoints a cause of increased mucin production, namely the gene MUC5AC.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
August is National Breastfeeding Month. According to the Office on Women’s Health, breastfed babies have lower risks during their childhood of obesity, ear infections, asthma and other conditions. Breast milk is rich in nutrients and easier for babies to digest than formula. Breastfeeding can help a mother’s health and healing following childbirth and leads to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, certain types of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, African American mothers have the lowest rates of starting and continuing to breastfeed their infant. See the Guide to Breastfeeding from the Office of...
Source: BHIC - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Children and Teens Minority Health Concerns Source Type: blogs
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Do you have pre-existing health conditions? Approximately 23 percent of Americans do. According to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, a pre-existing condition is “a medical condition that occurred before a program of health benefits went into effect.” Healthcare.gov defines it as “A health problem, like asthma, diabetes, or cancer, you had before the date that new health coverage starts. Insurance companies can’t refuse to cover treatment for your pre-existing condition or charge you more.” That means if an adult had a childhood disease, that’s a pre-exi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Featured Posts Health Disparities Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law ACA Affordable Care Act pre-existing conditions Source Type: blogs
The role of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in type I hypersensitivity reactions and protection against helminthic parasites is well known.1 However, clinical observations and several epidemiological studies have also suggested a potential association between a history of atopy, total serum IgE level and risk of developing malignancy. 2-5 There are also studies that suggest a role of IgE in cancer immune surveillance, although the exact mechanisms are not completely understood. For instance, IgE  antibodies have been found to be involved in antibody-dependent cytotoxicity against tumor antigens in pancreatic6 and ovarian7 cancers.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 2 August 2018Source: The Lancet Respiratory MedicineAuthor(s): Carolyn S Calfee, Kevin L Delucchi, Pratik Sinha, Michael A Matthay, Jonathan Hackett, Manu Shankar-Hari, Cliona McDowell, John G Laffey, Cecilia M O'Kane, Daniel F McAuley, Andrew J Johnston, Archana Paikray, Cat Yates, Petra Polgarova, Esther Price, Amy McInerney, Katarzyna Zamoscik, Ged Dempsey, Colette Seasman, Lynn GilfeatherSummaryBackgroundPrecision medicine approaches that target patients on the basis of disease subtype have transformed treatment approaches to cancer, asthma, and other heterogeneous syndromes. Two dist...
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This case shows the importance of patient compliance and timely treatment of SCC and surgical wounds in an immunosuppressed individual. PMID: 30059340 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Wounds - Category: General Medicine Tags: Wounds Source Type: research
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