Researchers develop nanodiscs to deliver personalized cancer therapy

Researchers from the University of Michigan have developed nanodiscs that deliver a customized therapeutic vaccine to treat colon and melanoma cancer in mice. The team’s work was published in Nature Materials. “We are basically educating the immune system with these nanodiscs so that immune cells can attack cancer cells in a personalized manner,” senior author James Moon said in prepared remarks. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Researchers develop nanodiscs to deliver personalized cancer therapy appeared first on MassDevice.
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Oncology Pharmaceuticals Research & Development University of Michigan Source Type: news

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AbstractBackgroundRetrospective studies indicate that the use of regional anaesthesia causes a reduction in cancer recurrence after oncological surgery, which could be due to anaesthetic ’s negating effect on immunosuppression related to the surgical stress response. Local anaesthetics may also exert direct suppressive effects on malignant cells, an area where further investigation is urgently needed.MethodsHuman colon cancer cells and human melanoma cells were cultured and then treated with 1  mM bupivacaine or levobupivacaine for up to 24 or 48 h. Their migratory ability was measured by scratch assay, pro...
Source: Journal of Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The important role of the CT in the preoperative diagnosis of intussusception and characterizing its causes cannot be overemphasized. All transient cases had a short segment of intussusception. PMID: 30350523 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Acta Gastroenterol Belg Source Type: research
(York University) Researchers at York University have found a new role for a well-known protein in the body that may explain, in part, what goes wrong in certain cancers, as well as vascular and neurological disorders.Beta-catenin, a wide-ranging and important protein for the regulation of cell function from the embryonic stage to adulthood, has already been implicated in the development of certain cancers, including colon, breast, leukemia and melanoma.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: news
Increased glucose consumption distinguishes cancer cells from normal cells and is known as the “Warburg effect” because of increased glycolysis. Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) is a key glycolytic enzyme, a hallmark of aggressive cancers, and believed to be the major enzyme responsible for pyruvate-to-lactate conversion. To elucidate its role in tumor growth, we disrupted both the LDHA and LDHB genes in two cancer cell lines (human colon adenocarcinoma and murine melanoma cells). Surprisingly, neither LDHA nor LDHB knockout strongly reduced lactate secretion. In contrast, double knockout (LDHA/B-DKO) fully suppr...
Source: Journal of Biological Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Cell Biology Source Type: research
Publication date: 5 February 2019Source: Journal of Molecular Structure, Volume 1177Author(s): Kazem Karami, Mahzad Rahimi, Mostafa Zakariazadeh, Orhan Buyukgungor, Amir Abbas Momtazi-Borojeni, Seyed-Alireza EsmaeiliAbstract{[Ag(FBPY)2]+(FBPYH)+}(OTF)2, FBPY=FPhC(O)C(H)PPh3, FBPYH =FC6H4COCH2PPh3, OTF=CF3SO3, a ylidic complex, was prepared through the reaction of silver trifluoromethanesulfonate (AgOTf) and ylide [FBPY] in 1:2 M ratio and characterized using various techniques. X-ray crystallography was used to determine the crystal structure. CT-DNA binding interaction of the synthesis compound was tested by fluore...
Source: Journal of Molecular Structure - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
This study was set out from recent evidence that extracellular acidity may increase the exosome release by cancer cells. However, this preliminary evidence did not provide solid information on whether the pH-dependent exosome over-release represents a common feature of all cancers. To the purpose of demonstrating that cancer acidity is a major determinant in inducing an increased exosome release by human cancer cells, we evaluated human tumor cell lines deriving from either colon, breast, prostate cancers, melanoma, or osteosarcoma. All cell lines were cultured in either the current 7.4 pH or the typical pH of cancer that ...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
As a pharmacist, Kathy James considers herself well educated about the importance of getting regular cancer screenings. Even though the 55-year-old had no history of cancer in her family, she never skipped her regular mammograms, and she gave herself regular breast exams. So she was dumbfounded when, during one of those self-exams in May 2017, she felt a marble-size lump in her left breast. A visit to the doctor confirmed it. “The radiologist came in with his hands in his pockets and looked down and said, ‘It doesn’t look good,'” James says. After a biopsy, James and her husband learned she had meta...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Frontiers of Medicine Source Type: news
Authors: Kang SH, Cho J, Jeong H, Kwon SY Abstract Purpose: Expression of RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) is induced by hypoxia and hypothermia. Recently, high expression of RBM3 was reported to be associated with a good prognosis in colon cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and malignant melanoma. Studies on RBM3 in invasive breast carcinoma (IBC), however, are limited. Methods: RBM3 expression was examined using a tissue microarray from 361 patients with IBC. Immunohistochemistry was performed for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and ...
Source: Journal of Breast Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: J Breast Cancer Source Type: research
It wasn’t the Nobel Committee that reached James Allison first on Monday to inform him that he had won the coveted annual prize in Physiology or Medicine. It was his son who broke the news with a 5:30 am phone call. Minutes later, a Swedish reporter reached him before the committee could. “I was like, ‘Oh my God, it happened,’” Allison says to TIME. “I’m just in shock, I guess.” Allison, chair of immunology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, was awarded the Nobel for his discovery in 1994 in mice that led to an entirely new class of anti-cancer drugs called...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news
It wasn’t the Nobel Committee that reached James Allison first on Monday to inform him that he had won the coveted annual prize in Physiology or Medicine. It was his son who broke the news with a 5:30 am phone call. Minutes later, a Swedish reporter reached him before the committee could. “I was like, ‘Oh my God, it happened,’” Allison says to TIME. “I’m just in shock, I guess.” Allison, chair of immunology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, was awarded the Nobel for his discovery in 1994 in mice that led to an entirely new class of anti-cancer drugs called...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news
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