Opening the Book on ED Metrics

Conclusions Medical directors are generally under pressure to improve some aspect of the department’s performance. While we always have to keep the overall operation of the department in mind, we are also at the mercy of how individuals perform. We can’t control every aspect of the ED visit. But things that we can control and things we can measure, we need to take advantage of. Start with awareness of the key metrics and then add in transparency. Be sure to establish goals and work with your under-performers on improvement strategies. As I’ve heard ACEP President Jay Kaplan say many times, “If you want to improve performance, publish your data. If you want to improve it faster, be transparent and publish names with the data.” Dr. Silverman is chairman of emergency medicine at the Virginia Hospital Center and is a partner at Emergency Medicine Associates. He is also the author of the book Director’s Corner, available on Amazon. Tweetable: If you’re not already looking at CT utilization, I can assure you this is coming. The post Opening the Book on ED Metrics appeared first on Emergency Physicians Monthly.
Source: EPMonthly.com - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

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Headache is a very common condition that affects up to 60% of the world’s population. In general, headache can be classified into two main categories: primary and secondary headaches. A primary headache is related to increased sensitivities, but not structural alterations of brain tissues. Common primary headaches are migraine with and without aura, tension-type headache, and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (headaches, such as cluster headache, that also involve facial pain and autonomic symptoms such as tear production and nasal congestion). Secondary headaches have various underlying causes including structural v...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Headache Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
Abstract SYNOPSIS: Whiplash and concussion may have similar presenting symptoms, biomechanical mechanisms, and neurophysiological sequelae, but neither enjoys a gold standard diagnostic test. Guidelines for whiplash and concussion are developed and implemented separately. This disparate process may contribute to misdiagnosis, delay appropriate primary care management, and impair patient outcomes. In our clinical commentary, we present 3 cases where signs and symptoms consistent with whiplash were identified in primary care. Symptoms in all cases included neck pain, headache, dizziness, and concentration deficits, ...
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther Source Type: research
​BY ALI OZCAN, MD; AYUSH GUPTA, MD; ISABEL NEACATO, MD; DAVID DONALDSON, DO; &SHANNA JONES, MDA 17-year-old boy presented to the pediatric emergency department complaining of a right shoulder injury and right clavicular pain for two hours. The pain started after he checked another player into the boards while playing hockey. He had no head injury, loss of consciousness, or other trauma. He took 600 mg of ibuprofen with no relief, so he came to the ED.He had no past medical or surgical problems, and reported his pain as 4/10 over the clavicle region. His review of system was otherwise negative. The patient's vitals we...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
Discussion Protective helmets are used for multiple occupational and recreational activities. They are designed to protect the head from the common problems associated with the activity. For example, hard hats for construction workers are meant to protect against superior and lateral objects contacting the head as something can fall from above or a worker may contact an object as they are moving. The helmet had a plastic suspension ring that sits on the head providing space between the plastic helmet and the head allowing for the striking force to be dissipated over that distance before the helmet contacts the head. Helmet...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Discussion Oropharyngeal trauma is common and ranges from minor contusions to severe trauma of the head and neck. Sudden movement while having a foreign object in the mouth is a very common scenario with falls or collisions being common mechanisms. Common objects include toys, sticks, pens/pencils, chopsticks, toothbrushes, and popsicle sticks. Many of these injuries cause minimal problems such as a contusion to lips (i.e. “fat lip”). In general, the more anterior the location the more common the injury and the less likely to have a severe injury (i.e. lips). Whereas posterior structures are more protected, bu...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Authors: Ichinose D, Tochigi S, Tanaka T, Suzuki T, Takei J, Hatano K, Kajiwara I, Maruyama F, Sakamoto H, Hasegawa Y, Tani S, Murayama Y Abstract A 40-year-old man presented with a severe headache, lower back pain, and lower abdominal pain 1 month after a head injury caused by falling. Computed tomography (CT) of the head demonstrated bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with a significant amount in the left frontoparietal region. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine also revealed CSDH from L2 to S1 level. A simple drainage for the intracranial CSDH on the left side was perf...
Source: Neurologia Medico-Chirurgica - Category: Neurosurgery Tags: Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo) Source Type: research
Depression is the leading cause of disability in the United States among people ages 15 to 44. While there are many effective treatments for depression, first-line approaches such as antidepressants and psychotherapy do not work for everyone. In fact, approximately two-thirds of people with depression don’t get adequate relief from the first antidepressant they try. After 2 months of treatment, at least some symptoms will remain for these individuals, and each subsequent medication tried is actually less likely to help than the one prior. What can people with depression do when they do not respond to first-line treat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Mental Health Source Type: blogs
Psychosocial factors, such as trauma in childhood, have been often associated with chronic pain in adulthood. The purpose of this study is to further explore the relationship between childhood trauma and chronic pain by examining the relationship between experiences of bullying in secondary school and doctors' visits. Participants were 328 college students attending a southwestern university. Participants were asked if they had ever experienced a minor head injury, injury to back or neck and, if so, participants then indicated if they had seen a doctor for said injury, and how often.
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
The US health care system is plagued by the use of services that provide little clinical benefit. Estimates of expenditures on overuse of medical services range from 10–30 percent of total health care spending. These estimates are typically based on analyses of the geographic variation in patterns of care. For example, researchers at the Dartmouth Institute focused on differences in care use between high-spending and low-spending regions with no corresponding reductions in quality or outcomes. An analysis by the Network for Excellence in Health Innovation (formerly known as the New England Healthcare Institute) ident...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Costs and Spending Quality Choosing Wisely inefficiency overuse of medical services Source Type: blogs
MedTech Strategist working together with The Medical Alley Association for the very first time brought their premier innovation summit to Minnesota, a place now considered by many to be the global epicenter of health innovation and care. Over the two...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
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