Nanodiscs deliver personalized cancer therapy to immune system

Researchers have had initial success in mice using nanodiscs to deliver a customized therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of colon and melanoma cancer tumors.
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 19 April 2019Source: Nitric OxideAuthor(s): Hugo P. Monteiro, Elaine G. Rodrigues, Adriana K.C. Amorim Reis, Luiz S. Longo, Fernando T. Ogata, Ana I.S. Moretti, Paulo E. da Costa, Ana C.S. Teodoro, Maytê S. Toledo, Arnold SternAbstractCancer development is closely related to chronic inflammation, which is associated with identifiable markers of tumor progression, such as uncontrolled cell proliferation, angiogenesis, genomic instability, chemotherapeutic resistance, and metastases. Redox processes mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) within the inflammator...
Source: Nitric Oxide - Category: Chemistry Source Type: research
ICD is a prerequisite for induction of patient-specific protective immunity against tumor antigens. We hypothesize that the efficacy of Extracorporeal photochemotherapy (ECP) in initiating anti-lymphoma tumor specific immunity is traceable to its efficient induction of ICD in cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) malignant cells following their lethal exposure to photoactivated 8-methoxysporalen (8-MOPA). We tested that premise in a standard animal ICD vaccination assay, in three murine solid tumor models (sB16-OVA melanoma, YUMMER melanoma and MC38 colon cancer).
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Photobiology Source Type: research
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 31002181 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Genitourinary Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol Source Type: research
This study was carried out in accordance with the recommendations of international guidelines and ethical standards with written informed consent from all subjects. All subjects gave written informed consent in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. The protocol was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of Kunming General Hospital, China. miRNAs, Plasmids, Transfection, and Irradiation To predict miRNAs with potential binding sites in the 3′UTR of PHLDA2, Targetscan (http://www.targetscan.org/), miRanda (http://www.microrna.org/), and Diana database (http://diana.cslab,ece.nura.gr/) algorithms were u...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions In this review, we analyzed mechanisms through which mitobolites, a distinct set of mitochondria-generated metabolites, can be released from mitochondria and then act as second messengers that contribute to cellular and organismal aging by regulating longevity-defining processes outside of mitochondria. Our analysis indicates that in eukaryotes across phyla, these second messengers of cellular aging exhibit the following common features: (1) they are produced in mitochondria in response to certain changes in the nutrient, stress, proliferation or age status of the cell; it remains unknown, however, what kind o...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusions MDSC are major players in the immunosuppressive scenario in cancer, thanks to their phenotype heterogeneity and critical interaction with several innate immune cells, thus representing a crucial target in oncology. Here we reviewed the interactions of MDSCs with NK cells. The contribution of key cytokines, chemokines and mediators active in this process have been discussed. We also described the contribution of MDSC on angiogenesis directly or indirectly through interactions with NK and immunosuppressive activities. A parallel of the cancer associated to the decidual counterpart of these cells is discussed, a...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In this study, the gut microbiota of 30 LC patients and 30 healthy controls were examined via next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA and analyzed for diversity and biomarkers. We found that there was no decrease in significant microbial diversity (alpha diversity) in LC patients compared to controls (P observed = 0.1422), while the composition (beta diversity) differed significantly between patients and controls (phylum [stress = 0.153], class [stress = 0.16], order [stress = 0.146], family [stress = 0.153]). Controls had a higher abundance of the bacterial phylum Actinobacteria and genus Bifidobacterium, while patients wi...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities of SNG in a panel of MM cell lines (U266, IM9, MM1S, and RPMI-8226). SNG treatment of MM cells resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability through mitochondrial membrane potential loss and activation of caspase 3, 9, and cleavage of PARP. Pre-treatment of MM cells with a universal caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, prevented SNG mediated loss of cell viability, apoptosis, and caspase activation, confirming that SNG-mediated apoptosis is caspase-dependent. The SNG-mediated apoptosis appears to be resulted from suppres...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Markus Hartl* and Rainer Schneider Center of Molecular Biosciences (CMBI), Institute of Biochemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria The neuronal proteins GAP43 (neuromodulin), MARCKS, and BASP1 are highly expressed in the growth cones of nerve cells where they are involved in signal transmission and cytoskeleton organization. Although their primary structures are unrelated, these signaling proteins share several structural properties like fatty acid modification, and the presence of cationic effector domains. GAP43, MARCKS, and BASP1 bind to cell membrane phospholipids, a process reversibly regulate...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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