Fatal Progressive Membranous Obliterative Bronchitis: A Sequela of Influenza?

Occlusion of the bronchial orifices by tissue-like structures is an uncommonly reported finding: it has been referred to as bronchial webs, bronchial synechiae, vanishing bronchus syndrome, or membranous obliterative bronchitis. It differs from bronchiolitis obliterans, a well-described clinical entity that involves smaller airways not visualized on bronchoscopy. Although initially only recognized as a congenital condition, later reports have described it in situations where chronic inflammation results in the irritation of the airways. Here we report a case of a woman with postinfectious bronchiectasis who developed membranous occlusion of multiple subsegmental bronchi, resulting in progressive airflow obstruction and postobstructive collapse of involved lung parenchyma. This process eventually caused her demise. It the first report of membranous occlusion of the bronchi in an adult who does not have cystic fibrosis or a history of lung transplantation. Clinicians should be aware of this entity, and further research could help illuminate its pathogenesis and management.
Source: Journal of Bronchology and Interventional Pulmonology - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

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In conclusion, children younger than 5 years, especially boys, were vulnerable groups for pandemic influenza, presenting as a mild disease with low mortality and few complications. Most of the affected children with influenza did not have important risk factors such as asthma and obesity, highlighted by other authors as significant risk factors. PMID: 31969753 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Acta Clinica Croatica - Category: General Medicine Tags: Acta Clin Croat Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Use of the CFTR modulator lumacaftor/ivacaftor was associated with significantly lower hepatic steatosis. No association between CFRD and hepatic steatosis was found in this cohort. PMID: 31966908 [PubMed]
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of PIGCH remains clinically challenging and requires a high index of suspicion as well as a thorough history, physical examination, serological workup and liver biopsy. Treatment of the underlying cause can result in clinical stability in a large number of cases. PMID: 31966907 [PubMed]
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Darcy K. Weidemann, Alison G. Abraham, Jennifer L. Roem, Susan L. Furth, Bradley A. WaradyRationale &ObjectiveSoluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a novel biomarker associated with incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) and has been identified as an independent risk factor for CKD progression in children, although these findings remain preliminary, limited to a single point in time, and unreplicated in pediatric cohorts.Study DesignProspective longitudinal cohort study.Setting &Participants5...
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Jennifer Y. So, Karen M. Warburton, Ilene M. RosenDaytime sleepiness, also known as hypersomnolence, is common among patients receiving maintenance dialysis and following successful kidney transplantation. Sleepiness may be secondary to medical comorbid conditions, medication side effect, insufficient sleep syndrome, and sleep-disordered breathing or the result of a primary central disorder of hypersomnolence, such as narcolepsy. Unrecognized and untreated sleep disorders are associated with substantial morbidity and mor...
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
What is a coronavirus? Coronaviruses are a group of viruses that cause diseases in mammals, including humans, and birds. Why are they called coronaviruses? The name derives from the fact that the viral capsule has a “halo” or “crown” surrounding it. What do coronaviruses do? In humans, the virus infects the airways giving rise to flu-like symptoms, a runny nose, cough, sore throat and fever, these are usually mild, but in rare cases can be lethal. Is there a vaccine against coronaviruses? No. Are there any drugs to block or treat infection? No. When were coronaviruses first discovered? In the 1960s ...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
Publication date: 25–31 January 2020Source: The Lancet, Volume 395, Issue 10220Author(s): Jessica R Allegretti, Benjamin H Mullish
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
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Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
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Source: Microbial Pathogenesis - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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Source: Current Otorhinolaryngology Reports - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
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