Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Reminder: Suicides Don't Actually Increase Around The Holidays

Suicide rates are usually at their lowest during the month of December. But you wouldn’t know it based on stories in the media that link this time of year to self-harm. Nearly half of stories about holidays and suicide published during last year’s holiday season perpetuated the myth that they increase, according to a new analysis conducted by the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania. “This information is simply not correct,” Dan Romer, research director of the APPC, told The Huffington Post. “This has been a hard myth to debunk.” The APPC has been tracking media reporting on the suicide and holidays misconception since 1999, using the Nexis database. In that time frame, there were only two holiday seasons where the majority of related coverage discredited the myth. Typically, there’s an even split between quashing and affirming the idea, according to the APPC data. There’s no definitive insight into the roots of how this myth began, but Romer has a few theories. Pop culture, for starters, tends to highlight the idea that the colder months are associated with more desperate or lonely thoughts. Take the classic holiday film “It’s A Wonderful Life,” in which the main character contemplates his life and impact, for example.  The winter blues may also be a factor. Seasonal affective disorder, a behavioral health condition often coupled with depression and associated with a ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Our society tends to dismiss seasonal affective disorder (SAD). We minimize it. We misunderstand it. Oh, you just don’t like winter. And who could blame you? Winter is tough on everyone. Oh, SAD is like the winter blues, right? You get grumpy or moody because you hate the freezing cold. You’re just in a funk. It happens to a lot of people. It’s totally normal. How can you feel depressed when the air is so crisp and it’s a winter wonderland out there? We incorporate SAD into our vocabulary, flippantly using it in conversation. “Similar to someone saying “I can’t make up my mind, it...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Depression Disorders General Seasonal Affective Disorder Stigma Light therapy Mental Health Stigma phototherapy SAD summer depression summertime depression winter depression wintertime depression Source Type: news
Gray and cloudy skies are not unusual in the Pacific Northwest. But, as the days become shorter and the dark starts setting in about mid-afternoon, it is easy to be less energized and feel more like hibernating. This is not unusual. However, for those who experience Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), other more intense symptoms may appear such as: sadness    gloomy outlook sadness gloomy outlook feeling hopeless, worthless, or irritable loss of interest or pleasure in activities low energy difficulty sleeping or oversleeping carbohydrate cravings and weight gain thoughts of death or even suicide The causes of S...
Source: Dragonfly - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Health Literacy/Consumer Health Source Type: news
This article on SAD describes it as follows: Seasonal affective disorder is characterized by feelings of sadness and depression that occur in the fall or winter months when the temperatures begin to drop and the days grow shorter. The depressive episode is often associated with excessive eating, sleeping, and weight gain. Depressive symptoms begin in the fall or winter and persist until the spring. Women are twice to three times more likely to suffer from the winter blues than men. Seasonal affective disorder can also impact people during the summer months (“the summer blues”), too, but it is less common. Peopl...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression OCD Research Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Sad Seasonal Affective Disorder Source Type: blogs
By Christian Jarrett The clocks have gone back and there’s a chill in the air. It’s well known that during these darker months, a significant minority of us experience unwelcome negative changes to our mood (at least if you believe in the notion of Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD, which not all experts do). Now an intriguing study in Psychiatry Research has explored the link this condition may have with another psychiatric diagnosis, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The results suggest that people with OCD are more likely than average to experience seasonal effects on their mood, and that for these ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental health Source Type: blogs
Contrary to what some people may believe, depression and sadness are not the same thing. Sadness can come and go and affects your mood, while depression is a lingering cloud that affects your overall ability to function. Sometimes it can be tricky to distinguish between what is normal for going through a rough patch of life and actual clinical depression. Read the signs below to determine if your Eeyore mood could be something more. Feeling sad about everything. Sadness is generally related to a specific situation. We are down in the dumps because we lost a job, experienced a breakup, are having financial struggles, etc. ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Depression Happiness Inspiration & Hope Self-Help Bipolar Disorder grief Mood Disorder Sadness Seasonal Affective Disorder Suicide Source Type: blogs
Is your mood influenced by weather? I am clearly affected by rain — especially when it rains consistently for weeks as it has lately. And I know other people who are, too, so I thought I’d study why the extra precipitation alters the limbic system (emotional center) of the brain and review the research regarding mood and weather. Studies that Link Mood and Weather John Grohol, PsyD, founder and CEO of Psych Central, offers a great overview of the studies that exist on weather and mood. There is research that says weather has little to do with mood, he notes, but “the overall preponderance of evi...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Depression Research Atmospheric pressure Bipolar Disorder Highly Sensitive Person Melancholy Sadness seasonal depressive disorder Spring summer Weather Source Type: blogs
If your teen is experiencing depression, it is likely the first time they have dealt with the overwhelming sensations that come with both situational and clinical depression. One of the ways you can help your child is by helping them recognize the difference between situational depression and clinical depression and understand their form of depression, as the treatment for these two types of depression vary. Recognizing Situational Depression Unlike clinical depression, doctors and psychologists have identified that situational depression is generally linked to large changes in a person’s life. Also sometimes called ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Children and Teens Depression Family Parenting Stress Students Adjustment Disorder Adolescence Bipolar Disorder Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Major Depressive Disorder Seasonal Affective Disorder Suicidal Ideation Suicide Teenag Source Type: blogs
“Sorrow comes to all… Perfect reality is not possible, except with time. You cannot now realize that you will ever feel better and yet you are sure to be happy again.” – Abraham Lincoln Sorrow is the opposite of happiness, yet both are part of human existence. Like life and death and the changing of seasons, it should be familiar enough to recognize that things have a sequence. Sometimes that sequence is a time of birth or rebirth, a creative force that erases failure and negativity. Other times, however, there’s a clearly defined sense of decay, lack of progress, mistakes and endings. The ke...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Family Grief and Loss Happiness Inspiration & Hope Marriage and Divorce Self-Help Breakups Broken Heart grieving Sadness Seasonal Affective Disorder Source Type: blogs
Following my post on my recent depression setback, I heard from many readers who were comforted to know that they were not alone. As I said in that piece, if you suffer from chronic depression, you know all too well that setbacks happen — even to those of us who think we’re doing everything right to protect our limbic systems from intense sadness and anxiety. I thought I would follow up, then, by listing some nuggets and things to remember that help me when I’m in a bad place. I hope they might help you, too. 1. Watch the Panic When my son was about 9 months old, loving to climb on everything but not yet ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Depression Inspiration & Hope Personal Self-Help Depressive Episode Major Depressive Disorder Mood Disorder Seasonal Affective Disorder Suicidal Thoughts Suicide Risk Source Type: blogs
Although the winter season begins with a bit of holiday cheer, many people feel a little “off” as the cold weather drags on. I’ve already seen a few patients who are puzzled by how easily they become irritated. “Is there something wrong with me?” “Why am I so unhappy?”  Often, their bodies are just responding to the darker and colder days. We are governed by circadian rhythms, our body’s natural clock that helps regulate important functions including sleep/wake cycles and mood. These rhythms can be thrown off by the winter season.1 The sky gets bright later in the mornin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Brain and cognitive health Mental Health SAD seasonal depression Source Type: blogs
More News: Databases & Libraries | Depression | International Medicine & Public Health | Men | Seasonal Affective Disorder | Suicide | University of Pennsylvania | Websites