Memory loss: Five new things

Purpose of review: Memory loss can be due to a wide variety of causes. We provide new information about the biology of common genetic and acquired causes of memory loss in older adults. Recent findings: New data are available about the genetics of Alzheimer disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and frontotemporal dementia. Amyloid PET, FDG-PET, and MRI have improved our understanding of how mild cognitive impairment evolves to AD. Several studies have shown links between concussion and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Healthy eating and regular exercise have been demonstrated to slow cognitive decline in older adults. Randomized trials continue to show benefits for cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine in patients with AD and DLB. Summary: New causes of memory loss are still being identified. More sophisticated diagnostic tools have improved our ability to make earlier diagnoses in older adults with memory loss.
Source: Neurology Clinical Practice - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: All Cognitive Disorders/Dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Dementia with Lewy bodies, Frontotemporal dementia Review Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: Neuroscience &Biobehavioral ReviewsAuthor(s): Filip Kosel, Jessica M.S. Pelley, Tamara B. FranklinAbstractTransgenic mouse models have been used extensively to model the cognitive impairments arising from Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related pathology. However, less is known about the relationship between AD-related pathology and the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) commonly presented by patients. This review discusses the BPSD-like behaviours recapitulated by several mouse models of AD-related pathology, including the APP/PS1, Tg2576...
Source: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Photo credit Imon Godfrey Dear Carol:  My parents are in their 80s and have been fortunate with their health, but I worry about how they will do in the future. They still live in their home which we have made safer with some upgrades so that’s going fine for now. Any help they’ve needed has been provided by family members without too much disruption, so we consider ourselves fortunate. What worries me is that while I don’t see signs of actual dementia, at least from what I know about it, I do see them filling in for each other more often when it comes to words. Should we be worried about them and the...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Publication date: 15 February 2020Source: New Scientist, Volume 245, Issue 3269Author(s): Elizabeth SandelOur knowledge of brain injury and the long-term effects of concussion has changed dramatically in recent years, says Elizabeth Sandel, particularly when it comes to children's sports
Source: New Scientist - Category: Science Source Type: research
Authors: Rao GP, Sivakumar PT, Srivastava S, Sidana RC PMID: 32055061 [PubMed]
Source: Indian Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Indian J Psychiatry Source Type: research
ConclusionsThese preliminary results suggest that the newly developed FCSRT version B is equivalent to version A in the main variables tested. Further studies are necessary to ensure interchangeability between versions. We provide normative data for the new version.ResumenIntroducciónEl test Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT) es una prueba de uso extendido para evaluar la memoria episódica verbal, principalmente en el ámbito de la enfermedad de Alzheimer. Existe una versión española de la prueba con datos normativos proveniente del proyecto NEURONORMA.ES. Disponer de versiones...
Source: Neurologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Authors: Niznik JD, Zhao X, He M, Aspinall SL, Hanlon JT, Nace D, Thorpe JM, Thorpe CT Abstract INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the impact of deprescribing acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) on aggressive behaviors and incident antipsychotic use in nursing home (NH) residents with severe dementia. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of Medicare claims, Part D, Minimum Data Set for NH residents aged 65+ with severe dementia receiving AChEIs in 2016. Aggressive behaviors were measured using the aggressive behavior scale (ABS; n = 30,788). Incident antipsychotic prescriptions were evaluated among antipsyc...
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research
CNN) — After examining the brains of former professional football players, researchers might be a step closer to diagnosing the devastating brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy in the living, according to a study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers utilized PET imaging to find tau, an abnormal protein that’s a signature indicator of CTE, using a radioactive drug or tracer called flortaucipir. The researchers imaged the brains of 26 living former football players and compared them with the brains of 31 people with no history of traumatic brain injury. (WBZ-TV) Th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health CNN CTE Source Type: news
NINETY-TWO percent of retired National Football League players have decreased cognitive function, according to a new study:“In the NFL group, baseline neuropsychological assessments showed 92% of players had decreased general cognitive proficiency, 86% had decreased information processing speed, 83% had memory loss, 83% had attentional deficits, and 85% had executive function impairment.”The Truth?The study reported on a self-selected sample of 161 current and retired NFL players recruited via a blog (“The NFL concealed the danger of brain injuries!!”), the Los Angeles Chapter of the Retired NFL Pla...
Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: blogs
Adrian Robinson Jr., a professional football player who died by suicide earlier this year, had a brain disease, his autopsy recently revealed. The same disorder has also been found in others who have sustained repeated blows to the head. Robinson, who played for several football teams, including the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Pittsburgh Steelers, died on May 16. During his two years in the National Football League (NFL), he suffered several concussions. Now, an autopsy revealed that he had signs of a chronic brain disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).  "He went from being one of ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Is brain damage an inevitable consequence of American football, an avoidable risk of it, or neither? An editorial published yesterday in the medical journal BMJ poses those provocative questions. Chad Asplund, director of sports medicine at Georgia Regents University, and Thomas Best, professor and chair of sports medicine at Ohio State University, offer an overview of the unresolved connection between playing football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a type of gradually worsening brain damage caused by repeated mild brain injuries or concussions. This condition was first described in a football player in 2005, after ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Anxiety and Depression Medical Research Memory Men's Health Mental Health Safety brain damage brain health chronic traumatic encephalopathy concussion football National Football League Source Type: news
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