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Queen's University expert leading € 4m bid to reduce impact of chemicals on long-term health

(Queen's University Belfast) A Queen's University Belfast expert is leading a € 4m international initiative to investigate whether natural toxins and manmade chemicals are creating potentially dangerous mixtures that affect our natural hormones and cause major illnesses such as cancer, obesity, diabetes or infertility.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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Men and women follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and can undergo important and sometime startling hormonal changes. Though results vary with stage of life—young adults, middle-aged, older—there are a variety of hormonal changes that women and men typically experience, some in concert, others independently. Such hormonal shifts can be powerful and part of the health-restoring menu of changes that develop with this lifestyle. They can even improve a relationship in a number of ways, both physically and emotionally, especially if we weave in some of the newer Wheat Belly/Undoctored concepts and practices such as oxy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle estradiol estrogen hormonal hormones Inflammation low-carb oxytocin testosterone Thyroid Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) You might want to skip the receipt the next time you buy something. According to a recent study, over “90 percent of receipts contain chemicals linked to infertility, autism and type-2 diabetes.” Dubbed the “gender-bending” chemical, Bisphenol A (BPA) and the “healthier alternative” called Bisphenol S (BPS) are used on 93 percent of...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Huixiao Hong Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can mimic natural hormone to interact with receptors in the endocrine system and thus disrupt the functions of the endocrine system, raising concerns on the public health. In addition to disruption of the endocrine system, some EDCs have been found associated with many diseases such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, infertility, asthma, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. EDCs that binding androgen receptor have been reported associated with diabetes mellitus in in vitro, animal, and clinical studies. In this review, we summarize the st...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Funding Opportunity PA-18-049 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to support exploratory/developmental research that explores the premise that fertility status can be a marker for overall health. It is clear that chronic conditions such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity can impair fertility, however less is known about the extent to which fertility status can impact or act as a marker for overall health. Data suggest that infertility is not necessarily a unique disease of the reproductive axis, but is often physiologically or genetically linked with oth...
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most frequent endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age, affecting 4%-10% of the population. It is a complex disorder classically characterized by chronic oligo- or anovulation, polycystic ovaries, and hyperandrogenism. It is also associated with a number of comorbid conditions, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, obesity, infertility, and breast and endometrial cancer [1,2]. In addition, psychiatric disorders are observed more often in PCOS patients than in the general population, particularly depressive, anxiety, and eating disorders [3 –6].
Source: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Neuroradiology / Neuroradiologie Source Type: research
Conclusion: To address the many challenges posed by EDCs, we argue that Africans should take the lead in prioritization and evaluation of environmental hazards, including EDCs. We recommend the institution of education and training programs for chemical users, adoption of the precautionary principle, establishment of biomonitoring programs, and funding of community-based epidemiology and wildlife research programs led and funded by African institutes and private companies. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1774 Received: 16 February 2017 Revised: 22 May 2017 Accepted: 24 May 2017 Published: 22 August 2017 Address correspond...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
This study has been limited for interpretation due to its small sample size and not being the primary focus of the original study.Coronal view showing bilateral polycystic ovaries.A more recent study compared separately the risk of PCOS and its relations to endometrial, ovarian, and breast cancers, which originally showed on analysis that ovarian cancer was not significant (OR 1.41;95% CI,0.93-2.15 p
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
Everyone understands that healthy eggs and sperm are required to conceive, right? So, it shouldn’t be a surprise when couples have trouble starting a family that male fertility plays a role – more often than most people realize. In fact, male factor infertility is the primary medical issue in about 25% of infertility cases and a contributing factor another 25% of the time. For years, it has often been assumed that problems getting pregnant were all about the female half of the couple. Thanks to extensive media coverage of research, sperm issues and the role of male infertility are now mainstream topics. Still,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
By Katrina Mark, MD 1. Fertility naturally declines as we age That alone doesn’t mean you should start to worry. The general advice I give a woman is if she has been trying to become pregnant for a full year with no luck, she might consider a fertility evaluation. For a woman over age 35, she might consider it after six months. If a woman is younger and has irregular periods, it’s likely she isn’t regularly ovulating, so she might want to be evaluated sooner. 2. Sometimes there’s a reason for infertility – and sometimes, there’s not There are some things we know cause infertility. About...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Health Tips Women's Health fertility Katrina Mark obgyn UMMC Source Type: blogs
This study shows that lifespan-extending conditions can slow molecular changes associated with an epigenetic clock in mice livers. Diverse interventions that extend mouse lifespan suppress shared age-associated epigenetic changes at critical gene regulatory regions Age-associated epigenetic changes are implicated in aging. Notably, age-associated DNA methylation changes comprise a so-called aging "clock", a robust biomarker of aging. However, while genetic, dietary and drug interventions can extend lifespan, their impact on the epigenome is uncharacterised. To fill this knowledge gap, we defined...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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