Handful of nuts 'cuts heart disease and cancer' risk

Conclusions This systematic review finds evidence that nut intake may be linked with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and death. The systematic review has several strengths. It identified a large number of studies with a large total sample size. It also included only prospective cohorts assessing nut consumption and then followed up later disease outcomes. It excluded cross sectional studies, which assess diet and disease at the same time, and so can't show the direction of effect. It also excluded cohorts that have retrospectively questioned diet when the person already has the disease, which could be subject to recall bias. However, there are still a number of inherent limitations which mean these studies cannot easily prove that nuts are the magic dietary ingredient that are solely and directly responsible for these outcomes. There were no randomised controlled trials of nut consumption. All studies were observational where people were choosing their own diet. The researchers took care to include studies that only looked at nut consumption as an independent factor and looked at results that had adjusted for any confounders. However, the factors that the studies adjusted for, and how well they were assessed, will have varied across studies. As such it's very difficult to prove that nuts alone are the causative factor and they are not just one component of a generally healthier lifestyle pattern, including balanced diet, regular physical activity, not smoking, ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Cancer Heart/lungs Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis with a variety of health conditions appears to prompt drinking cessation in older adults. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30758044 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news
(CNN) — People who eat diets that are high in fiber have lower risk of death and chronic diseases such as stroke or cancer compared with people with low fiber intake, a new analysis found. Dietary fiber includes plant-based carbohydrates such as whole-grain cereal, seeds and some legumes. Fiber’s health benefits have been recorded “by over 100 years of research,” Andrew Reynolds, a researcher at the University of Otago in New Zealand, wrote in an email. He is co-author of the new meta-analysis of existing research, which was published Thursday in the journal The Lancet. The research shows that high...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN fiber Local TV Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: The excess morbidity and mortality of older men with BD seems to be mediated by non-prudent lifestyle practices. If future studies can demonstrate that this association is causal, then lifestyle interventions will need to become an integral part of the management of older adults with BD. PMID: 30596455 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Aging and Mental Health - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Aging Ment Health Source Type: research
Each year, Americans’ most popular New Year’s resolutions are more or less the same: get healthy, get organized, save money. But doctors at the American Medical Association (AMA) have some more specific thoughts in mind for 2019. The AMA this week released a list of 10 wellness-focused resolutions that could “help Americans make the most impactful, long-lasting improvements to their health in 2019.” Here’s what they are — and how to make them happen. Learn your risk for type 2 diabetes Diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in the U.S., affecting an estimated 30 mil...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Holidays 2018 public health Source Type: news
Each year, Americans’ most popular New Year’s resolutions are more or less the same: get healthy, get organized, save money. But doctors at the American Medical Association (AMA) have some more specific thoughts in mind for 2019. The AMA this week released a list of 10 wellness-focused resolutions that could “help Americans make the most impactful, long-lasting improvements to their health in 2019.” Here’s what they are — and how to make them happen. Learn your risk for type 2 diabetes Diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in the U.S., affecting an estimated 30 mil...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Holidays 2018 public health Source Type: news
banes D Abstract RATIONALE: Although the health effects of beta carotene have been studied extensively, a systematic examination of serum concentrations and long-term mortality, including cardiovascular disease mortality, has not been reported. OBJECTIVE: Explore whether serum beta carotene is associated with overall and cause-specific mortality and to elucidate the strength and dose-response of the association. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a prospective serological analysis of 29 103 men in the ATBC study (Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention). During 31 years of follow-up, 23&t...
Source: Circulation Research - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circ Res Source Type: research
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Offbeat Local TV Meat Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Baby Boomer Health heart health Source Type: news
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