This Group Helps Fight Devastating Diseases The World Ignores

This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. This group is developing drugs to treat diseases that are too often left behind. The Drugs For Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi) develops treatments for neglected tropical diseases ― a group of at least 18 diseases, such as elephantiasis and river blindness, which affect more than 1 billion people but are largely unknown and under-resourced since they mainly impact poor communities.  “They’re diseases that nobody has ever heard of, that are difficult to pronounce, that do not make headlines,” DNDi’s Rachel Cohen says in the video above. “Because they affect poor, marginalized and vulnerable people all over the world.”  While some experts criticize pharmaceutical companies for not developing drugs to fight these diseases, others say more effort is needed from governments to prioritize research and development in health policies, reports The Guardian. “These diseases affect very poor patients who do not have the economic power to buy the treatment,” DNDi’s Dr. Natalie Strub-Wourgaft says in the video. “Therefore there is no return on investment from the pharmaceutical industry.”  DNDi uses a non-traditional, nonprofit model to develop new treatments for neglected diseases: By partnering with a variety of research institutes,...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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In this study, AT1-AAs were detected in the sera of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and the positive rate was 44.44% vs. 17.46% in non-PAD volunteers. In addition, analysis showed that AT1-AAs level was positively correlated with PAD. To reveal the causal relationship between AT1-AAs and vascular aging, an AT1-AAs-positive rat model was established by active immunization. The carotid pulse wave velocity was higher, and the aortic endothelium-dependent vasodilatation was attenuated significantly in the immunized rats. Morphological staining showed thickening of the aortic wall. Histological examination showe...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 18 October 2019Source: NeuroImage: ClinicalAuthor(s): Caiyun Zhang, Tatia M C Lee, Yunwei Fu, Chaoran Ren, Chetwyn C H Chan, Qian TaoAbstractCross-modal occipital responses appear to be essential for nonvisual processing in individuals with early blindness. However, it is not clear whether the recruitment of occipital regions depends on functional domain or sensory modality. The current study utilized a coordinate-based meta-analysis to identify the distinct brain regions involved in the functional domains of object, spatial/motion, and language processing and the common brain regions inv...
Source: NeuroImage: Clinical - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: In 2019 the German Commission for the Prevention of Blindness (DKVB) held an eye camp in the Tanzanian town of Sumbawanga. For patients with mature cataracts and the ability to see light cateracts were treated by manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS). For the first time in this camp the quality of the results of the cataract operations was measured. OBJECTIVE: The quality of the cataract operations is presented and the results were assessed in the context of the guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO). METHODS: Those patients who had a cataract operation in th...
Source: Der Ophthalmologe - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Ophthalmologe Source Type: research
Conclusions: Two novel G22S mutations of Cx46 and Cx50 were identified, and preliminary functional analysis revealed a potential deleterious effect of these mutations due to the malfunction of connexins. Abbreviations: ADCC: autosomal dominant congenital cataract; Cx26: connexin26; Cx32: connexin32; Cx46: connexin46; Cx46WT: wild-type connexin46; Cx50: Connexin50; Cx50WT: wild-type connexin50; DAPI: 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole; EGFP: enhanced green fluorescent protein; FBS: fetal bovine serum; GJA-:gap junction alpha-; PCR: polymerase chain reaction; PolyPhen: polymorphism phenotyping; PSIC: position-specific independent...
Source: Ophthalmic Genetics - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Ophthalmic Genet Source Type: research
El p árpado hinchado puede ir desde la irritación leve hasta afectar la visión. La mayoría de los casos son inofensivos. Lee sobre las causas más comunes, incluyendo orzuelos, cosméticos, alergias, herpes ocular y blefaritis, y cuándo ver al médico.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eye Health / Blindness Source Type: news
Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) due to insufficient aqueous humor outflow through the trabecular meshwork and Schlemm's canal (SC) is the most important risk factor for glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. We previously reported loss of function mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase TEK or its ligand ANGPT1 cause primary congenital glaucoma in humans and mice due to failure of SC development. Here, we describe a novel approach to enhance canal formation in these animals by deleting a single allele of the gene encoding the phosphatase PTPRB during development. Compared toTek haploinsufficient mice, whic...
Source: eLife - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Developmental Biology Human Biology and Medicine Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeImproved therapies for pediatric central nervous system (CNS) tumors have increased survival rates; however, many survivors experience significant long-term functional limitations. Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors can experience deficits in social attainment. The aim of this review was to systematically amalgamate findings pertaining to social attainment (i.e., educational attainment, marriage, employment outcomes) in survivors of pediatric CNS tumors.MethodsPubMed (web-based), PsycINFO (EBSCO), EMBASE (Ovid), and Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) were used to identify articles published between January 2011...
Source: Journal of Cancer Survivorship - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
[Citizen] Geneva -Here in Geneva, a child is depicted in a statue leading a blind man, who is affected by river blindness--one of Tanzania's five most common neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Other NTDs being trachoma, lymphatic filariasis, sleeping sickness, soil-transmitted worms and leprosy.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Conclusions Our calculations show that meeting the targets will lead to about 600 million averted DALYs in the period 2011–2030, nearly equally distributed between PCT and IDM-NTDs, with the health gain amongst PCT-NTDs mostly (96%) due to averted disability and amongst IDM-NTDs largely (95%) from averted mortality. These health gains include about 150 million averted irreversible disease manifestations (e.g. blindness) and 5 million averted deaths. Control of soil-transmitted helminths accounts for one third of all averted DALYs. We conclude that the projected health impact of the London Declaration justifies the required efforts.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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