Self-Induced Diagnosis

Over the summer, I noticed (I thought) that there were a couple of moles on my face that were getting a little crusty from time to time. I resolved not to make a big deal out of them but to make sure I asked my dermatologist about them at my annual skin check. In the meantime, I should forget about them.Of course I totally forgot about them because I have no brain these days. Then a few days ago I noticed they were a little crusty and reminded myself to ask my dermatologist. In the meantime, I self diagnosed myself with skin cancer, probably melanoma, Stage IV of course. I am so smart.You wonder about this. I am an educated person. I know how to be rational and sane and take a pragmatic approach to my life, and its medical disasters. I have my share of medical ailments and medical disasters. I am not due any more.But once that cancer crap gets in your brain, its hard to stop self diagnosing with more cancer crap.My dermatologist said they were nothing and I don't need to come back for another skin check for a couple of years. My poor brain.
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: brainless dermatologist over diagnosis scare Source Type: blogs

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The present review aimed to discuss contemporary scientific literature involving differences between the tumor microenvironment (TME) in melanoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer in their primary site and TME i...
Source: Journal of Translational Medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
AbstractLaser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is an emerging modality to treat benign and malignant brain lesions. LITT is a minimally invasive method to ablate tissue using laser‐induced tissue heating and serves as both a diagnostic and therapeutic modality for progressive brain lesions. We completed a single‐center retrospective analysis of all patients with progressive brain lesions treated with LITT since its introduction at our center in August of 2015. Twelve patients have been treated for a total of 13 procedures, of which 10 patients had brain metastases and 2 patients had primary malignant gliomas. Biopsi...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Lung Cancer, Melanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies, Neuro-Oncology, Breast Cancer Brief Communications Source Type: research
Authors: Han RH, Dunn GP, Chheda MG, Kim AH Abstract Metastases from melanoma, lung and breast cancer are among the most common causes of intracranial malignancy. Standard of care for brain metastases include a combination of surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery, and whole-brain radiation. However, evidence continues to accumulate regarding the efficacy of molecularly-targeted systemic treatments and immunotherapy. For non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), numerous clinical trials have demonstrated intracranial activity for inhibitors of EGFR and ALK. Patients with melanoma brain metastases may benefit from ...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe goal of our review is to describe the rationale for immunotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM), the current landscape of clinical trials for this disease process, and possible future directions based on anticipated results.Recent FindingsImmune checkpoint inhibition has shown efficacy in the treatment of several solid tumor brain metastases (i.e., melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer), but data specific to BCBM is relatively sparse. Preclinical studies in BCBM have illustrated a lower immune content in the brain microenvironment measured by tumor-infiltrating lym...
Source: Current Breast Cancer Reports - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of reviewAs the treatment of many malignancies has improved, brain metastases (BM) have been observed as a site of the first recurrence in patients with controlled systemic cancers. This suggests that while the administered chemotherapy is effective against systemic cancer, drug concentrations in the central nervous system (CNS) are likely too low to be effective. These findings are in accord with data suggesting that more than 98% of FDA-approved drugs on the market today are unable to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB).Recent findingsThis retrospective literature review was conducted to estimate the prop...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionAlthough LM arising from gynecological cancers is considered rare, identification of LM may be important to predict prognosis and develop new therapeutic strategies.
Source: International Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThere was limited intracranial clinical activity for abemaciclib monotherapy in NSCLC and MEL pts in this study; OIRR and short median PFS suggest that no further studies for abemaciclib monotherapy are warranted in this pt population.Clinical trial identificationNCT02308020.Editorial acknowledgementMedical writing assistance was provided by Kristi Gruver, employee of Eli Lilly and Company.Legal entity responsible for the studyEli Lilly and Company.FundingEli Lilly and Company.DisclosureE. Le Rhun: Advisory / Consultancy, Research grant / Funding (institution), Oscar Lambert Center, Lille, FR: Mundipharma; Resea...
Source: Annals of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundImmune therapies targeting the programmed cell death receptor (ligand) 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) axis have shown remarkable activity in a variety of solid tumors. While substantial responses were observed in asymptomatic patients with brain metastases (BM), their clinical activity in primary brain tumors remains limited. In a cohort of adult brain tumor patients, we aimed to analyze soluble PD-L1 (sPD-L1) levels in patient plasma as a systemic marker of tumor - immune system interactions.MethodsWe obtained EDTA plasma from 55 glioblastoma, 26 lower-grade (WHO grade II - III) glioma (LGG), 17 meningioma and 43 BM pat...
Source: Annals of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
SummaryThere has been a shift in the management of brain metastasis (BM), with increasing use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and delaying/avoiding whole ‐brain radiotherapy (WBRT), given the concern regarding the long‐term neurocognitive effect and quality of life impact of WBRT. It is, however, unclear as to the contemporary practice pattern and outcomes of SRS in Australia. We conducted a literature search in PubMed and MEDLINE using a series of keywords: ‘stereotactic’, ‘radiosurgery’ and ‘brain metastases’, limiting to Australian studies, which report on clinical outcomes fol...
Source: Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Radiation Oncology —Review Article Source Type: research
FINDINGSCancer that has spread to the central nervous system is notoriously difficult to treat. Now, UCLA researchers have developed a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier in order to reach and treat cancer that has spread to the central nervous system.In research conducted in mice, a single dose of cancer drugs in a nanoscale capsule developed by the scientists eliminated all B-cell lymphoma that had metastasized to the animals ’ central nervous system.BACKGROUNDAbout 15% to 40% of all cancers spread to the nervous system, but there are few treatment options and they only work in a small ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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