Most Men Know Surprisingly Little About Their Own Fertility

Male fertility rates have been steadily declining, and a new study suggests that men’s ignorance of infertility risk factors may be a major reason.  While up to half of infertility in couples is due to male infertility, most men have a limited awareness of risk factors that contribute to the inability to conceive naturally, the study found.  The findings, published in the November issue of the journal Human Reproduction, showed that men could identify only about half of the potential risks and health conditions that could significantly affect their sperm count and fertility.  The researchers surveyed more than 700 Canadian men aged 18 to 50 (with an average age of 34), who represented a range of ethnic backgrounds, income and education, and asked them to identify factors associated with male infertility.  Most men were able to identify well-known risk factors such as cancer, smoking, and steroid use, the study found. However, significantly fewer were aware that things like obesity, frequent bicycling, and using portable computers on their lap also were risk factors. “Childbearing, and problems related to it, are often seen as ‘women’s issues,’ even though most men want to have children some day,” study co-author Dr. Phyllis Zelkowitz, a professor and researcher of psychiatry at McGill University and the Jewish General Hospital, told The Huffington Post. “Also, men tend to ask fewer questions about their health...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: Oncotype is a cost-effective intervention from a health system perspective since each QALY gained costs less than 25,000 euros. From a societal perspective, it is dominant since it provides greater health and is accompanied by cost savings. PMID: 30442434 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Gaceta Sanitaria - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Gac Sanit Source Type: research
Abstract Human liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini is a major public health problem in Mekong countries such as Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Myanmar with over 10 million infected through consumption of fish containing infective metacercariae. With no tissue migration phase and living entirely within the larger secondary (intrahepatic) bile ducts, liver flukes are only exposed to a biliary mucosal immune response, while their excretory and secretory products also stimulate chronic inflammation of biliary epithelium. Neither mucosal nor tissue immune responses appear to cause parasi...
Source: Advances in Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Adv Parasitol Source Type: research
Abstract The availability of genome and transcriptome data of the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini provides the foundation for exploration of gene function and its effect on host-parasite interactions and pathogenesis of O. viverrini-associated bile duct cancer. Functional genomics approaches address the function of DNA at levels of the gene, RNA transcript and protein product using informative manipulations of the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, microbiome and metabolome. Advances in functional genomics for O. viverrini have thus far focused on RNA interference. The flukes have been transfected with...
Source: Advances in Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Adv Parasitol Source Type: research
DiscussionPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 6-8% of reproductive-age women making it the most common endocrinopathy in this age group. There is no consensus on the specific diagnostic criteria for PCOS in adolescents as many of the characteristics overlap with normal adolescent physiology. However, patients should have evidence of hyperandrogenism, oligo- or amenorrhea, and potentially polycystic ovaries. PCOS has a genetic component although a specific gene has not been identified. Incidence of PCOS is 20-40% for a woman with a family history. Hyperandrogenism Androgen levels change during puberty therefore actual ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Male fertility rates have been steadily declining, and a new study suggests that men’s ignorance of infertility risk factors may be a major reason.  While up to half of infertility in couples is due to male infertility, most men have a limited awareness of risk factors that contribute to the inability to conceive naturally, the study found.  The findings, published in the November issue of the journal Human Reproduction, showed that men could identify only about half of the potential risks and health conditions that could significantly affect their sperm count and fertility.  The researchers surve...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Authors: Valenzuela FJ, Vera J, Venegas C, Muñoz S, Oyarce S, Muñoz K, Lagunas C Abstract The circadian system is a supraphysiological system that modulates different biological functions such as metabolism, sleep-wake, cellular proliferation, and body temperature. Different chronodisruptors have been identified, such as shift work, feeding time, long days, and stress. The environmental changes and our modern lifestyle can alter the circadian system and increase the risk of developing pathologies such as cancer, preeclampsia, diabetes, and mood disorder. This system is organized by transcriptional/tra...
Source: International Journal of Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Int J Endocrinol Source Type: research
Infertility is often viewed as a woman's problem but when a couple has trouble conceiving, there's a good chance it's related to male factors -- in fact, that's the case 40-50 percent of the time. That's why the male partner should be part of any couple's fertility assessment. Not only is male infertility more common than most people realize, male factors are the sole reason for a couple's inability to have a baby 15 percent to 25 percent of the time. While some reasons for male infertility are well understood, at least 50 percent of problems are due to unknown factors. Male infertility can occur when men have a less t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Spring is upon us, a perfect time of year for detoxification. As the seasons change, many of us are motivated to do 'spring cleaning' in our homes and gardens. The same need applies to our bodies. When the body is detoxified, it can function more efficiently and gain resilience. Physicians have been seeing increasing symptoms of toxicity in their patients over the last few decades. Hormone imbalances, obesity, mental fog, memory loss, fatigue, lack of vitality, metabolic syndrome, sleep disturbances are all manifestations of a toxic body. Conventional medicine does not acknowledge toxicity as an important health issue, but...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion: there is no increased risk of doing the lymph node dissection early on.   Dr. Eggener-CON   Basics Lymph node dissections rarely done, even for large tumors, because there is no proven therapeutic or staging benefit for low risk patients.  A Mayo study revealed no data showing therapeutic benefit in high risk patients.  For clinically node negative high risk patients, there is staging value but no proven therapeutic benefit. Rate of positive nodes is associated with stage and grade; the higher the stage and grade, the more likely there will be positive nod...
Source: Kidney Cancer Association - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news
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