HRT Improves Bone Health in Young Menopausal Women HRT Improves Bone Health in Young Menopausal Women

Postmenopausal women taking hormone-replacement therapy have gains in bone-mineral density, mass, and structure, which persist for up to 2 years after treatment stops.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

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Conclusions Supplementation with soy protein with isoflavones for 6 months significantly improved CVR markers and calculated CVR at 6 months during early menopause compared to soy protein without isoflavones. ISRCTN registry ISRCTN34051237.
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Taking hormone replacement therapy during menopause may improve the structure and function of women's hearts, potentially lowering their risk of heart disease, say UK investigators.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - Category: Cardiology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news
ConclusionMultifactorial mechanisms lead to UUI and vascular risk factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of bladder overactivity in addition to higher BMI. Severe UUI appears to be a distinct presentation with more specific contributory mechanisms than milder UUI.
Source: BJU International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Women who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to help alleviate symptoms of the menopause may have an increased risk of hearing loss, a study has found.WebMD Health News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news
Authors: Tanaka S, Hishiki M, Ogasawara J, Sorimachi E, Nakayama M Abstract Although most women with type 1 diabetes experience the normal transition to menopause, there is little information about the impact of hormone replacement therapy on their glycemic profiles. A 54-year-old postmenopausal woman with fulminant type 1 diabetes was admitted to our hospital due to diabetic ketoacidosis. She was treated with fluid replacement and a continuous insulin infusion. Thereafter, her glycemic profile was well maintained by daily multiple insulin injections. However, her glycemic profiles immediately deteriorated followin...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Conclusion This study shows a strong link between migraine and cardiovascular disease, extending the link already found between migraine and stroke. However, many questions remain. We don't know if the results are relevant to men who have migraines, as all the people in the study were women. We also don't know if the results apply to non-white populations, as most of the women in the study were white. Previous studies on stroke have shown that the group at highest risk is who get an "aura" before a migraine – sensation(s) that tells them the migraine is on its way. But this study did not ask people about ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Neurology Source Type: news
ConclusionThis double-blind RCT found that women taking HRT less than six years after the menopause had slower artery wall thickening than those taking a placebo. This represented the main measure of atherosclerosis progression tested; other measures showed no difference, so the results were not as conclusive as they could have been. Women taking HRT 10 or more years after menopause also showed no difference in atherosclerosis progression compared with a placebo, further complicating the picture.An important limitation of this study is the lack of a patient relevant endpoint, such as cardiovascular events or mortality. Pre...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news
Abstract Post‐menopausal women with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are at an increased risk of hepatic fibrosis when compared with premenopausal women. Whether duration of estrogen deficiency in postmenopausal state dictates individual's fibrosis risk remains uninvestigated. We aimed to assess the associations of age at menopause and time from menopause with fibrosis severity in postmenopausal women with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Data from 488 post‐menopausal women with 1) histologic diagnosis of NAFLD and 2) self‐reported information on age at menopause were analyzed. The associations of prematu...
Source: Hepatology - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Steatohepatitis and Metabolic Liver Disease Source Type: research
Conclusions Prolactin is not associated with a comprehensive panel of incident cardiovascular disease risk factors. Measurement of circulating prolactin levels in the community likely does not provide substantial insight into cardiometabolic risk.
Source: JAHA:Journal of the American Heart Association - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Epidemiology, Obesity Source Type: research
By John Swartzberg, M.D. It's been dubbed "manopause" or "andropause" -- a midlife change for men that some claim is just like menopause for women. But there's no such thing. "Male menopause" is a creation of the pharmaceutical and supplement industries, along with unscrupulous or uninformed practitioners who feel that some of their potency -- sexual and otherwise -- is declining. It sounds perfectly reasonable at first, but scientifically speaking, there's no evidence that men go through menopause in the same way that women do. That's not to say that men's testosterone levels don't decline ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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