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Examining music as a therapy for complex needs and offending behaviour

This study utilised the rapid evidence assessment (REA) approach to collect and assess the current data pertaining to music as a therapy for complex needs and offending behaviour. Within the REA this study used a thematic analysis as the analytical framework to manage and explore the wealth of data collected during the REA. Findings The results of this study are presented in two parts – first, the application of music as a therapy for complex needs and second, music as a therapy for offending behaviour. These two sections explore music therapy as an effective intervention method for offending behaviour and/or complex needs. Psychopathy as a complex need is a subsidiary theme th at is also investigated within this section. Research limitations/implications To present music as a therapy as an effective method of therapy and intervention for those with offending behaviour and/or complex needs, thus, leading to further research in the field. Practical implications To incor porate music therapy into working with offending behaviour; to incorporate music therapy into interventions for those with complex needs, such as psychopaths; to recognise a need for developing innovative approaches/methods to address gaps in treatment; and to recognise music therapy’s potential a s a programme utilised alongside cognitive-behavioural therapy. Originality/value There has been a significant amount of academic attention given to researching music as an effective therapy for select gro...
Source: Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice - Category: Criminology Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 26 October 2017 Source:Epilepsy & Behavior Author(s): Andres M. Kanner, Helen Scharfman, Nathalie Jette, Evdokia Anagnostou, Christophe Bernard, Carol Camfield, Peter Camfield, Karen Legg, Ilan Dinstein, Peter Giacobe, Alon Friedman, Bernd Pohlmann-Eden Epilepsy is a neurologic condition which often occurs with other neurologic and psychiatric disorders. The relation between epilepsy and these conditions is complex. Some population-based studies have identified a bidirectional relation, whereby not only patients with epilepsy are at increased risk of suffering from some of these neur...
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 July 2017 Source:Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of Disease Author(s): Stefanie Hardt, Juliana Heidler, Boris Albuquerque, Lucie Valek, Christine Altmann, Annett Wilken-Schmitz, Michael K.E. Schäfer, Ilka Wittig, Irmgard Tegeder Affective and cognitive processing of nociception contributes to the development of chronic pain and vice versa, pain may precipitate psychopathologic symptoms. We hypothesized a higher risk for the latter with immanent neurologic diseases and studied this potential interrelationship in progranulin-deficient mice, which are a model f...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Molecular Basis of Disease - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
— Hundreds of companies around the globe, now including Elon Musk’s Neuralink and even Facebook,  are researching and developing new ways to help brain owners be smarter, sharper, and healthier. What explains this flurry of activity? Where may it be headed? To help you understand what’s going on, let me highlight five key facts that emerged from the recent SharpBrains Virtual Summit, where 200+ participants in 16 countries shared and discussed the latest about neurotech­nolo­gy, brain health and digital health.   Fact 1. There are 7.5 billion human brains out there, a...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology Akili Baycrest Brain-health BrainHQ Claritas Mindsciences Click Therapeutics cogmed Cogniciti cognifit digital health Educational Testing Service Elon Musk Facebook Headsp Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: FDA labeling plays an important but imperfect role in influencing how providers select medications. Prescribing increases for medications with new indications. Conversely, black box warnings of potentially dangerous side effects result in decreased prescribing. However, labeled indications often lag the science, and prescribing patterns should be tracked to inform the need for more education, research, and labeling changes. PMID: 28093058 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Psychiatric Services - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatr Serv Source Type: research
In 2016, Behind the Headlines covered more than 300 health stories that made it into the mainstream media. If you've been paying attention you should find this quiz easy and fun. Answers are at the foot of the page (no peeking!).   In January 2016's health news... In a controversial study, monkeys were genetically engineered to develop what condition? Sex addiction Bipolar disorder Autism In a similarly controversial study, what psychological condition was dismissed as a "myth"? Seasonal affective disorder Agoraphobia Social anxiety disorder In February 2016's health news... Brain scans...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Special reports QA articles Source Type: news
Conclusion The baby boomer generation represents the first generation of babies to have grown up with the NHS (founded in 1948). Thankfully, health issues such as death during childbirth, high levels of child mortality and high rates of fatal infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis, are largely a thing of a past. But new challenges have arisen. So-called "lifestyle diseases" such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease, are now a leading cause of death in England (as well as other developed countries). Also, age-related conditions such as dementia are far more common than in previous decades. Everyone can improve...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Older people Source Type: news
The dietary supplement has already been linked to lower depression, treating autism and reducing social anxiety. PSYBLOG READER OFFER: Get both of Dr Jeremy Dean's ebooks for $20 with the code "GLVDXH4P" (saving of 25%): The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything To get the offer add both books to the basket, then use the code at the checkout.
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Dementia Source Type: blogs
When disability rights advocate Anastasia Somoza, a young woman with cerebral palsy, gave her rousing speech at the Democratic National Convention in July she did more to bring disability into the mainstream’s view than anyone else in recent memory. She also reminded the world that there is a gender dimension to disability, one too long overlooked, misunderstood or left unaddressed. One in five American women – about 27 million of them – have a disability. That number, which is growing, includes women veterans. But women with disabilities often have to fight against two forms of discrimination, one relate...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Disabilities Women Source Type: blogs
At the very dawn of modern medicine, 2500 years ago, Hippocrates made its most important and robust finding: 1/3 of patients get better without treatment; 1/3 don't get better even with treatment; and only 1/3 actually benefit from treatment. The ratios do vary depending on the type of disease, it's severity and chronicity, and the power and specificity of the available treatments. Whenever a disease is chronic and/or severe, spontaneous recovery is less likely, treatment will more likely be needed, and full response to treatment is less likely. But on average, Hippocrates' "rule of thirds" stands up remark...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
(Stitching by Alisa Burke) His shoes are almost always brown. Sometimes, like last week, his socks match his bright green jacket, which I think is worn on days with rain. But I can't be sure; my evidence is sketchy, inconsistent, and random. I sit across from him, on a nubby burnt orange sofa that feels sturdy and new-ish and is so dark it is almost red; it is long enough for a family of four, depending on the capacity of that family for closeness. Which, perhaps, is the point in his line of work. In May of last year, I started seeing a psychiatrist; it is time for us to shed the stigma that rides alongside mental health ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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