Bagged salads 'pose salmonella risk,' say researchers

Conclusion This laboratory study principally demonstrates that salad leaf juice – released from salad leaves when they are damaged or broken – supports the growth of salmonella bacteria, even at fridge temperature. If leaves are contaminated with salmonella, this isn't removed by washing in water. The results don't show that all packaged salad leaves are contaminated with gut bacteria like salmonella. What they do show is that if the bags have been contaminated with gut bacteria, these bacteria will replicate, even in the fridge, and there's little you can do to remove them. The best thing to do is to throw the bag out, although there's no way of knowing whether a particular bag is contaminated or not.   The study also cannot tell us whether we may be safer buying packaged salads unwashed, washed in spring water, or washed in chlorinated water. And neither can it tell us whether we may be safer buying non-packaged lettuce – it's still possible that an unpacked lettuce may have been contaminated at some point along the line. But any risk of food poisoning is far outweighed by the health benefits of eating fresh veg, such as reducing the risk of heart disease, stroke and some cancers. You should be reassured that the contamination levels in the food chain are in reality very low, with only 0-3% of raw food products found to be contaminated. Commonsense precautions will also reduce the risk: Hands should be thoroughly washed with soap and water,...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

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Gastric cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer deaths worldwide. The best current option for reducing gastric cancer deaths is Helicobacter pylori eradication combined with risk assessment and surveillance programs for those deemed to be at high risk for gastric cancer so as to identify lesions at a stage amenable to curative therapy. In this issue, Nam et  al1 report a retrospective study of Helicobacter pylori eradication on gastric cancer incidence among 10,328 Korean adults undergoing health checkups including an H pylori test-and-treat program.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
We read with great interest the comment by Dr Li and colleagues1 referring to our study on endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) for early colorectal cancer.2 We would like to thank the editors for the opportunity to reply.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Gastric cancer remains one of the most common cancers worldwide and is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality, trailing only lung and colon cancer.1 Given its historically low survival rates, early detection and resection is the most effective strategy to improve prognosis. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), a technique developed in Japan, enables en bloc resection of early gastric cancer (EGC) and can be curative for selected lesions, depending on the histologic features, size, and tumor depth.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
We read with interest the article by Kuellmer et  al1 evaluating endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) for early colorectal cancer. The authors found that EFTR for early colorectal cancer was feasible and safe. Because their findings are important to current practice, several questions deserve attention.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
We have read with great interest the study by Januszewicz et  al1 describing the concept of endoscopist biopsy rate (EBR) as a potential quality indicator for routine diagnostic outpatient EGD. The authors found a significant variability in EBR among 26 endoscopists and an association between higher EBR, a higher detection of gastric precancerous conditions, and a lower risk of missed gastric cancers.1
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeFatigue is a common and distressing symptom in cancer patients which negatively affects patients ’ daily functioning and health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess multidimensional fatigue in patients with brain metastases (BM) before, and after Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS).MethodsPatients with BM, an expected survival  >  3 months, and a Karnofsky Performance Status ≥ 70 and 104 Dutch non-cancer controls were recruited. The Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI), measuring general fatigue, physical fatigue, mental fatigue, reduced ac...
Source: Journal of Neuro-Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur results suggest a role of decreased MPC1 copy number segments in reducing overall survival in glioblastoma. MPC1 deletion is associated with poor response to TMZ chemotherapy in GBM.
Source: Journal of Neuro-Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Source: Karmanos Cancer Institute - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
The USPSTF has upheld its'do not screen'recommendation for pancreatic cancer in the general population, but experts argue for screening for high-risk individuals.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news
ConclusionTogether these results emphasize an anti-tumorigenic role with a potential therapeutic value for PRL in HER-2 and luminal B breast cancer subtypes targeting the cancer stem-like cells.
Source: Stem Cell Research - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
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