Why Do We Worry?

Conclusion Worry is a normal phenomenon that affects us all. Worry can be adaptive in situations where there is a real possibility of injury or death, but in the majority of instances, is not a successful strategy to deal with the vicissitudes of life.  Research shows that when worry becomes severe and excessive, individuals are at risk of developing generalized anxiety disorder; a condition involving chronic worry, muscles tension, and irritability. Individuals with this disorder may worry for a variety of reasons, such as to avoid mental imagery of disastrous outcomes, to tolerate ambiguity and uncertainty, to avoid worry itself, and to avoid sudden changes in the emotional status quo. Cognitive-behavior therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy have been proven as successful therapies in the treatment of chronic worry.   References Behar, E., DiMarco, I. D., Hekler, E. B., Mohlman, J., & Staples, A. M. (2009). Current theoretical models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): Conceptual review and treatment implications. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 23(8), 1011-1023. Dugas, M. J., Gagnon, F., Ladouceur, R., & Freeston, M. H. (1998). Generalized anxiety disorder: A preliminary test of a conceptual model. Behaviour research and therapy, 36(2), 215-226. Mennin, D. S., Heimberg, R. G., Turk, C. L., & Fresco, D. M. (2005). Preliminary evidence for an emotion dysregulation model of generalized anxiety disorder. Behaviour research and therapy, 43(10), 1281...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Neuroscience Stress chronic worry Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Generalized Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder Psychology Rumination Social Anxiety Disorder Source Type: news