Could Common Heartburn Drugs Up Stroke Risk?

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 -- A popular category of heartburn medications -- including Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix -- may increase your risk of stroke, a new study suggests. Known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), these drugs increased...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

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As I note here from time to time, health care -- which for various reasons I prefer to call medical services -- costs a helluva lot of money. Enough to make you sick. Health care spending grew from about 7% of the economy in 1970 to almost 18% today, about $11,600 per person. That ’s more than any other country. In fact it’s about twice the average of the wealthy countries. But we get less for it. We don’t live as long, and by most indicators we aren’t as healthy, as people in those other countries that spend far less on health care.  There are a few reasons for this that I've talked about...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
While most people are familiar with the hallmark symptoms of COVID-19 by now—cough, fever, muscle aches, headaches and difficulty breathing—a new crop of medical conditions are emerging from the more than 4 million confirmed cases of the disease around the world. These include skin rashes, diarrhea, kidney abnormalities and potentially life-threatening blood clots. It’s not unusual for viruses to directly infect and affect different tissues and organs in the body, but it is a bit unusual for a primarily respiratory virus like SARS-CoV-2, which is responsible for COVID-19, to have such a wide-ranging reach...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Most people know about the damaging effects that binge drinking can bring to someone’s life. Loss of enjoyment of life, losing family relationships, financial and career struggles, homelessness, and legal consequences are just the tip of the iceberg. However, it can be more difficult to realize the long-term effect of binge drinking on the body, because you cannot always see it. Frequent binge drinking poses many dangerous health risks, and many of them can lead to death. Facts on Long-Term Effect of Binge Drinking on the Body For men, binge drinking is defined as consuming five or more drinks within about two hour...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center binge binge drinking Source Type: blogs
If you’re like most people, you’ve seen a ton of direct-to-consumer (DTC) drug ads in recent years. They’re all over television, in magazines, online, on billboards, and slapped on the sides of buses, promoting treatments for arthritis, cancer, heartburn, psoriasis, flagging memory — and more. The deluge of drug ads can be overwhelming. Worse, the information is often incomplete, biased, or confusing. That’s why we’re launching the Harvard Health Ad Watch series to highlight some benefits and problems with health product advertisements. We’ll focus on the evidence behind the ads an...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Drugs and Supplements Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — When heartburn or ulcer pain strikes, drugs can target stomach acid to calm bellies and offer relief. But a new study suggests the medications may come with a hive-inducing side effect: allergies. After analyzing health insurance data from more than 8 million people in Austria, researchers found that prescriptions of anti-allergy medications surged in those who were prescribed stomach acid inhibitors, a class of drugs that includes proton-pump inhibitors and H2 blockers. The findings, published Tuesday in the medical journal Nature Communications, suggest that disrupting the stomach’s delicate balance o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Allergies CNN Heartburn Source Type: news
You're reading 5 Surprising Things Stress Can Do to Your Body, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. You just got off a terrible meeting, your boss gave you an impossible deadline for the next project, your team is pushing you to make extra hours, and you still need to pick up the kids at school. Your body is in a “fight or flight response.” Your stress levels are high, you feel your breath get quicker and even feel your heart beating faster than usual. Although this is all a natural response from y...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement stress Source Type: blogs
A previously healthy, well-appearing 42-year-old female living in a modern, high-rise apartment in downtown Los Angeles calls 9-1-1 at 5:30 am complaining of worsening of a burning, epigastric pain she had been experiencing for the last three days. She reports associated nausea and non-bloody, non-bilious vomiting, and that she couldn’t manage to get comfortable in bed until she finally decided to call for help at daybreak. During her 9-1-1 call, she reports “pain, like heartburn, that just woke me up again and I had to throw up, … and then I was sweating so much.” Using the Los Angeles Tiered Disp...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Exclusive Articles Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news
Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra and then suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath. At night, the ice weasels come. ~ Matt Groening Social psychologist Daniel Gilbert of Harvard University said, “In many ways, navigating the social world is more complicated than a voyage to the moon. But it’s a journey we have to take, because whether we like it or not, our happiness is in each other’s hands.” Our sadness is also in each other’s hands, and is most easily induced by those we most love. Rejection from a loved one can feel like the end of the world and can elicit profound ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books Creativity Grief and Loss Marriage and Divorce Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Relationships Self-Help Heartbreak Sense Of Humor Source Type: blogs
At the end of a long day, it’s tempting to dive into your social feeds or Netflix queue the minute you’ve finished eating. But back before screens bogarted all our free time, an after-dinner stroll was a popular activity and one associated with improved health and digestion. “Italians have been walking after meals for centuries,” says Loretta DiPietro, a professor of exercise science at George Washington University’s Milken Institute School of Public Health, “so it must be good.” Research backs this up. One small study co-authored by DiPietro found that when older adults at risk fo...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Source Type: news
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling You might call them pain relievers. You might take them for back pain, headache, or arthritis. Your doctor calls them “NSAIDs,” which stands for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Whatever you call them and for whatever reason you take them, NSAIDs are among the most popular medications worldwide. In fact, estimates suggest that about 15% of the US population takes an NSAID regularly (including those that are over the counter and prescription strength). Along with sporadic users, more than 30 billion doses are taken each year. Some of the most common NSAIDs include ibuprofe...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Arthritis Back Pain Drugs and Supplements Headache Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs
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