Lab-grown vaginas successfully implanted

Conclusion This small case series reports the apparent success of using tissue engineering techniques to develop a vagina for reconstruction in four teenage girls who had an absent vagina from birth. All of these girls had the rare condition Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKHS), where the vagina and uterus do not develop properly. The technique used tissue samples biopsied from the girls' own vulva, which were then developed in the laboratory to make a 3D structure for reconstruction. It was hoped that by using this approach they might avoid some of the problems seen with the various types of graft tissue previously used, including abnormal muscle function. Over up to eight years' follow-up, the reconstructed vaginas did seem to have a similar structure to normal vaginal tissue. The girls and women reported normal sexual function without unexpected adverse effects or complications. This study only reports on a very small sample of four girls with this condition. Further use of this technique is needed to see if the same successful results are replicated. With that limitation in mind, this study – as well as the related study about nostril reconstruction – suggests that tissue engineering is an avenue of research with a great deal of potential. Analysis by Bazian. Edited by NHS Choices. Follow Behind the Headlines on Twitter. Join the Healthy Evidence forum. Links To The Headlines Doctors implant lab-grown vagina. BBC News, April 11 2014...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Source Type: news

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AbstractSTUDY QUESTIONDo sexual functioning, sexual esteem, genital self-image and psychological and relational functioning in women with Mayer –Rokitansky–Küster–Hauser (MRKH) syndrome differ from a comparison group of women without the condition?SUMMARY ANSWERIn comparison to controls, women with MRKH with a non-surgically or surgically created neovagina did not differ in psychological and relational functioning but reported lower sexual esteem and more negative genital self-image, intercourse-related pain, clinically relevant sexual distress and sexual dysfunction, with sexual esteem levels strong...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
The objective was to provide a minimally invasive neovaginoplasty technique to construct a nearly physiological vagina to facilitate sexual functioning and appropriate vaginal length in patients with congenital vaginal agenesis. This is a retrospective study at a tertiary care hospital. 52 patients with congenital vaginal agenesis owing to Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome or androgen insensitivity syndrome presented for vaginal reconstruction. Modified McIndoe vaginoplasty was done in all patients between 2010 and 2018using a vaginal mold created with glove, nonadherent petroleum gauze, and Interceed absorbable...
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
​BY DHIMITRI A. NIKOLLA, DO; BRENDAN A. MICCIO; MELODY L. MILLIRON; &BRETT FOREHAND, MD, PHDA 49-year-old woman with a past medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented to the emergency department with epigastric pain. She said the pain radiated to her chest and had been intermittent for six months, but it had been progressively worsening over the previous three weeks. Her pain was exacerbated by eating, and was associated with early satiety and nausea. She complained of a 30-pound weight loss over the preceding three months.Her vital signs included a blood pressure of 116/80 mm Hg, a heart rate...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
This spring, 31-year-old Heather Bankos donated her uterus through a research program at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, becoming about the 70th woman to do so worldwide. Bankos does not know the identity of her recipient, but most women in Baylor’s program have Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome, a congenital condition that occurs in females, leading to an underdeveloped or absent uterus. Bankos, who lives in Pennsylvania and has three kids of her own (ages 8, 6 and 3), explains why she wanted to donate her uterus, and what she hopes it brings to its recipient. —Jamie Ducharme, TIME staff...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news
CONCLUSION(S)In the past, the uterus with a rudimentary cavity of the MRKH patients was always excised. And the patients lost the chance of menstrual onset and fertility. Combined laparoscopic and Wharton-Sheares-George cervicovaginal reconstruction using SIS graft provided a minimally invasive, safe, and effective surgical option for the young patient with MRKH syndrome with a rudimentary cavity. The technique is not complex and easy to learn and perform. And it provided a result with functional and anatomical satisfaction. No special surgical apparatus is needed.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
CONCLUSION(S) In the past, the uterus with a rudimentary cavity of the MRKH patients was always excised. And the patients lost the chance of menstrual onset and fertility. Combined laparoscopic and Wharton-Sheares-George cervicovaginal reconstruction using SIS graft provided a minimally invasive, safe, and effective surgical option for the young patient with MRKH syndrome with a rudimentary cavity. The technique is not complex and easy to learn and perform. And it provided a result with functional and anatomical satisfaction. No special surgical apparatus is needed.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
MRKH patients may report cyclical abdominal pain, which has most frequently been attributed to ovulation pain, on the presumption that there is no functional uterine tissue present. MRI is increasingly used as an investigative imaging modality and has become standard practice, and detail of the uterine anlage can now be defined. Our hypothesis is that the cyclical abdominal pain may more often be due to functional anlage than had previously been believed.
Source: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionIncidence of abnormally located ovary was significantly increased in patients with MRKH syndrome. Such knowledge is important for infertility treatment, evaluation of pelvic pain, and surgical planning for MRKH patients.
Source: Abdominal Imaging - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
MRKH patients may report cyclical abdominal pain, which has most frequently been attributed to ovulation pain, on the presumption that there is no functional uterine tissue present. MRI is increasingly used as an investigative imaging modality and has become standard practice, and detail of the uterine anlage can now be defined. Our hypothesis is that the cyclical abdominal pain may more often be due to functional anlage than had previously been believed.
Source: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first case of MRKH presenting with a bicuspid aortic valve and radial dysplasia. A review of the literature reveals no other cases of MRKH with these unique anomalies. PMID: 29415121 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
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