Red Wine Chemical Enhances Mesothelioma Chemotherapy

A new experimental treatment combining a chemical found in red wine and a popular chemotherapy drug showed a powerful synergistic effect in targeting pleural mesothelioma cells. Researchers at Soon Chun Hyang University Hospital Cheonan in South Korea combined the platinum-based chemotherapy drug cisplatin with resveratrol, a natural antioxidant found in wine and red grapes. The result successfully induced apoptosis, or the process of natural cell death, in malignant mesothelioma cells. Cisplatin has long been one of the most popular drugs to treat mesothelioma and a variety of other cancers. But like many chemotherapy drugs, cisplatin’s efficacy remains limited. Resistance can develop following prolonged cycles or can be present innately in patients. The resveratrol made mesothelioma cells much more vulnerable to cisplatin, an effect Soon Chun Hyang researchers hope will translate into future treatment options. Furthermore, the data showed the increased resistance of the cells is related to the activation of self-defensive autophagy, or the destructive mechanism of the cell that disassembles unnecessary or dysfunctional components. “The molecular basis of the synergistic anti-cancer activities of [cisplatin] and [resveratrol] is not yet understood in detail,” lead investigator Yoon-Jin Lee wrote in the study. “However, emerging studies have revealed that [resveratrol] acts as an excellent candidate for potentiation of platinum treatment in vitro ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: chemotherapy for mesothelioma cisplatin for mesothelioma mesothelioma treatment with red wine red wine for cancer resveratrol and cisplatin for cancer resveratrol in red wine Soon Chun Hyang University Hospital Cheonan Source Type: news

Related Links:

Conclusions: Most cancer outcomes are consistent with background risk in refinery workers. This work has clarified an excess mesothelioma risk, conditional on study quality stratification. Continued surveillance is warranted for melanoma and ALL.
Source: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Standard mesothelioma treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and multimodal therapy. These standard therapies do not offer a cure for people with mesothelioma, and that’s why scientists continue searching for better ways to treat the disease. Researchers at the Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, Florida, have created a precision medicine approach that targets a protein on the surface of cancer cells to kill tumors. Although the drug was not specifically designed for mesothelioma patients, it may offer a more effective way to manage the disease in the future. The treatment is a type of...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Authors: Maxim LD, Utell MJ Abstract This literature review on refractory ceramic fibers (RCF) summarizes relevant information on manufacturing, processing, applications, occupational exposure, toxicology and epidemiology studies. Rodent toxicology studies conducted in the 1980s showed that RCF caused fibrosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma. Interpretation of these studies was difficult for various reasons (e.g. overload in chronic inhalation bioassays), but spurred the development of a comprehensive product stewardship program under EPA and later OSHA oversight. Epidemiology studies (both morbidity and mortality) w...
Source: Inhalation Toxicology - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Inhal Toxicol Source Type: research
For newly diagnosed mesothelioma patients, standard treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and multimodal therapy, which combines these options in various ways. However, more physicians are adding precision medicine to the mix, including targeted therapies such as immunotherapy or drugs aimed at a specific genetic mutation in a tumor. Clinical trials have shown a new drug called AZD5363 attacks a gene that is mutated in some mesothelioma tumors. The drug was not designed for mesothelioma patients, but it may offer another mesothelioma treatment avenue in the future. Limited Options Inspire New T...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
We describe a 57-year-old female patient diagnosed with sporadic MTC. The patient had a history of other neoplasias, such as acute myeloid leukemia, for which she had received chemotherapy, and two other solid tumors, peritoneal mesothelioma and meningioma. Genetic analyses were carried out including whole exome and Sanger sequencing (WES and SS) and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) testing for the respective loci. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used for the detection of proteins of interest. WES showed two germline variants in the APC and RASAL1 genes confirmed by SS. In MTC tissue only there was a RETvariant identified by SS...
Source: Hormones - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Hormones (Athens) Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Increases in leukemia and urinary cancer but not lung cancer mortality were found. One death attributed to mesothelioma was observed in a worker with self-reported asbestos exposure and a work history where occupational asbestos exposure may have occurred, rendering uncertainties in assigning causation. Radiographic analyses indicated RCF exposure alone is associated with increased pleural but not interstitial changes. Reductions in RCF exposure should continue. The mortality study is ongoing. PMID: 29124996 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Inhalation Toxicology - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Inhal Toxicol Source Type: research
Treatment options for malignant mesothelioma may soon include customized gene therapy, according to thoracic surgeon and scientist Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Gene therapy involves a laboratory reprogramming of a patient’s own T cells, which are a type of white blood cell, to recognize and destroy the cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the first gene therapy specifically for pediatric leukemia, signaling the start of a new approach to cancer treatment in this country. The newly approved treatment is also known as chimeric antigen rece...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: CAR T cell therapy checkpoint blockade chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy Dr. Andy Haas Dr. Prasad Adusumilli Dr. Scott Gottlieb FDA Commissioner gene therapy cancer gene therapy for mesothelioma immunotherapy clinical trial mali Source Type: news
Albelda Cancer immunotherapy has now become a recognized approach to treating cancers. In addition to checkpoint blockade, adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) using chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown impressive clinical outcomes in leukemias and is now being explored in solid tumors. CARs are engineered receptors, stably or transiently transduced into T cells, that aim to enhance T cell effector function by recognizing and binding to a specific tumor-associated antigen. In this review, we provide a summary of CAR T cell preclinical studies and clinical trials for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare, locall...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
AbstractAttaching a cytotoxic “payload” to an antibody to form an antibody–drug conjugate (ADC) provides a mechanism for selective delivery of the cytotoxic agent to cancer cells via the specific binding of the antibody to cancer-selective cell surface molecules. The first ADC to receive marketing authorization was gemtuzu mab ozogamicin, which comprises an anti-CD33 antibody conjugated to a highly potent DNA-targeting antibiotic, calicheamicin, approved in 2000 for treating acute myeloid leukemia. It was withdrawn from the US market in 2010 following an unsuccessful confirmatory trial. The development of...
Source: Advances in Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Emergency diagnosis of cancer is common and aetiologically complex. The proportion of emergency presenters who have consulted previously with relevant symptoms is uncertain. AIM: To examine how many patients with cancer, who were diagnosed as emergencies, have had previous primary care consultations with relevant symptoms; and among those, to examine how many had multiple consultations. DESIGN AND SETTING: Secondary analysis of patient survey data from the 2010 English Cancer Patient Experience Survey (CPES), previously linked to population-based data on diagnostic route. METHOD...
Source: The British Journal of General Practice - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Br J Gen Pract Source Type: research
More News: Asbestosis | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cancer Therapy | Chemistry | Chemotherapy | Clinical Trials | Environmental Health | Grapes | Hospitals | Leukemia | Mesothelioma | Molecular Biology | Study | Toxicology