Meet The Doctor Behind The Most Extreme Face Transplant Ever

Last August, Dr. Eduardo Rodriguez performed the most extensive face transplant operation ever.  In the 26-hour operation, which took place at New York University Langone Medical Center, the dentist-turned-plastic-surgeon and his team removed the face and scalp of a young victim of a fatal accident and successfully grafted the tissue onto the head of Patrick Hardison, a firefighter who had been horribly burned in a 2001 fire.  The operation showed in dramatic fashion just how far organ transplantation has come since its start in 1954, when surgeons at Brigham Hospital in Boston took a kidney from one man and gave it to his twin. In the six decades since then, doctors learned how to transplant not just kidneys but also hearts, lungs, livers and other “solid” organs. Now they’re transplanting faces, hands, arms, uteruses, penises and other body parts that ― unlike solid organs ― are made up of multiple tissues, including blood vessels, muscle and bone. “It is an exciting time, and the future of organ transplantation continues to evolve,” Rodriguez told The Huffington Post in an email. Rodriguez wants face transplantation to become the “standard of care for individuals in need.” But this will happen only if some major obstacles are overcome. The high cost of these procedures is one: Who will pay for operations like face transplants, which in the case of the injured firefighter cost an estimated $1 million? Then th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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By ANISH KOKA MD  The message comes in over the office slack line at 1:05 pm. There are four patients in rooms, one new, 3 patients in the waiting room. Really, not an ideal time to deal with this particular message. “Kathy the home care nurse for Mrs. C called and said her weight yesterday was 185, today it is 194, she has +4 pitting edema, heart rate 120, BP 140/70 standing, 120/64 sitting” I know Mrs. C well. She has severe COPD from smoking for 45 of the last 55 years. Every breath looks like an effort because it is. The worst part of it all is that Mrs. C just returned home from the hospital just days...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Hospitals Medicare Anish Koka hospital readmissions HRRP MedPAC Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, there are many anti-aging strategies in development, some of which have shown considerable promise for slowing down aging or delaying the onset of age-related diseases. From multiple pre-clinical studies, it appears that upregulation of autophagy through autophagy enhancers, elimination of senescent cells using senolytics, transfusion of plasma from young blood, neurogenesis and BDNF enhancement through specific drugs are promising approaches to sustain normal health during aging and also to postpone age-related diseases. However, these approaches will require critical assessment in clinical trials to determ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Acute renal cortical necrosis is a rare cause of intrinsic acute kidney injury (AKI) which is commonly associated with obstetric complications such as placental abruption and some serious systemic disorders such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome, sepsis, severe burns, and snake bite. Acute pancreatitis is an extremely rare cause of renal cortical necrosis, and only less than 10 cases are reported in the literature. Here, we present a 24-year-old male presented with features of acute pancreatitis and oliguric AKI. His pancreatic enzymes were above 1000 IU/mL at admission. He was initiated on hemodialysis. Percu...
Source: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018Source: The SurgeonAuthor(s): Branislav Kollar, Bohdan PomahacAbstractHundred years ago, Sir Harold Gillies laid a foundation to the modern plastic surgery trying to reconstruct facial defects of severely disfigured soldiers of World War I. Some years later, Joseph Murray experimented with rejection of skin grafts aimed for treatment of burned patients who sustained their injuries on battlefields of World War II. In 1954, the acquired expertise and intensive research allowed him to perform the first successful kidney transplantation in the world at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital ...
Source: The Surgeon - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Abstract IgA nephropathy (IgAN) remains one of the most common glomerular lesions, which has a striking geographic distribution and is the most common form of primary glomerular disease in Asia. However, the exact prevalence or clinicopathological spectrum of IgAN in India is not well documented. This retrospective study analyzed the presentation in 126 patients of primary IgAN out of 298 native kidney biopsies (42.28%) performed over a period of three years (2013-2015). The patients were followed up for three months. This is the second highest prevalence recorded in the world after Japan. Among the clinical featu...
Source: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl Source Type: research
The week of April 23-27 has been designated as National Pediatric Transplant Week.  This week is to bring attention to the great need for organ donations and to honor  donors and their families whose incredibly selfless gift has given someone the gift of life.While most of us will never experience the need for a transplant, there are many of us who know someone who has a debilitating condition such as kidney dialysis that are in need of a transplant.Right now there are almost 2,000 children on the national transplant list.  Those needing hearts, lungs, eyes, tissue, liver, kidney, or some other body part are...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Volunteer Opportunities Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018 Source:The Surgeon Author(s): Branislav Kollar, Bohdan Pomahac Hundred years ago, Sir Harold Gillies laid a foundation to the modern plastic surgery trying to reconstruct facial defects of severely disfigured soldiers of World War I. Some years later, Joseph Murray experimented with rejection of skin grafts aimed for treatment of burned patients who sustained their injuries on battlefields of World War II. In 1954, the acquired expertise and intensive research allowed him to perform the first successful kidney transplantation in the world at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Bo...
Source: The Surgeon - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Making human tissue in a lab has always been more sci-fi than sci-fact, but powerful genetic technologies may change that soon. For the most part, the only way to replace diseased or failing hearts, lungs, kidneys and livers is with donor organs. Even then, many people struggle to find a good biological match with a donor, and 8,000 die each year in the U.S. while waiting for an organ. In one promising solution to the shortage, researchers have been putting a new DNA editing tool called CRISPR through rigorous tests in organ regeneration. Last August, a group of scientists led by George Church, professor of genetics at Har...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity organ transplants Source Type: news
Rationale: Povidone-iodine is a broad-spectrum antiseptic applied topically to treat wounds and prevent their infection. There have been several case reports of acute kidney injury (AKI) in burn patients after povidone-iodine irrigation and in patients receiving the substance as a sclerotherapy agent for management of lymphocele after renal transplantation. However, biopsy-confirmed AKI after ingestion of povidone-iodine has not previously been described. Patient concerns: A 47-year-old man who had apparently ingested povidone-iodine solution and presented with nausea, vomiting, and reduced urine output. Laboratory da...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
ConclusionA viable and reproducible NMP system was established and tested in porcine kidneys, which was able to simulate graft function extra‐corporeally. Further work is required to identify the most optimal perfusion conditions. Prior to its utilization in clinical transplantation, the system should be tested in non‐transplanted human kidneys.
Source: ANZ Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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